Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 13-10-2007, 05:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find
it useful info.


ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season
with a couple friends and needed to vacuum seal individual
servings of chili, sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a
problem and solved it. I thought I'd pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered
up so they wouldn't seal properly with out wiping them off
prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably
flexible, around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to
the bottom. Approximately 1/2 way so that when you scoop the
food into the tube it falls out the tube into the bag
without messing up the outside bottom of the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides.
Works great.
--
Steve

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Old 13-10-2007, 07:10 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 383
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

Steve Calvin wrote:
* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find it useful info.


ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season with a
couple friends and needed to vacuum seal individual servings of chili,
sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a problem and solved it. I
thought I'd pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered up so they
wouldn't seal properly with out wiping them off prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably flexible,
around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to the bottom.
Approximately 1/2 way so that when you scoop the food into the tube it
falls out the tube into the bag without messing up the outside bottom of
the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides. Works great.


The Food saver sealer I use would still wick the moisture into the
sealed line and make a mess in the collection tray inside the sealer.
When doing something like you're recommending, I put the substance into
small Tupperware-type containers and freeze them first. The frozen
contents can then be removed by a swift 'bang' on the cutting board and
the frozen block of whatever inserted into the vac bag cleanly. Since
I'm gonna freeze whatever anyway, the only additional work is in washing
the Tupperware afterward- but then I have a dishwasher and that makes it
a snap anyway.

Nonny

--
---Nonnymus---
No matter how large your boat,
the person you are talking with will
have a close friend with a larger one.
---Observation by my son
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Old 13-10-2007, 07:52 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 933
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

Nonnymus wrote:

The Food saver sealer I use would still wick the moisture into the
sealed line and make a mess in the collection tray inside the sealer.


Mine has wet/dry and high/low settings, plus I can hold a
button to get the vac I want and then hit another button to
seal it when it gets to where I want it so that's not a
problem for me.

When doing something like you're recommending, I put the substance into
small Tupperware-type containers and freeze them first. The frozen
contents can then be removed by a swift 'bang' on the cutting board and
the frozen block of whatever inserted into the vac bag cleanly.


True, but I didn't have the time.

Actually someone else recommended just folding the top of
the bag back. Well, DUH... why didn't I think of that....

--
Steve
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Old 13-10-2007, 11:23 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 403
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 12:05:44 -0400, Steve Calvin
wrote:

* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find
it useful info.


ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season
with a couple friends and needed to vacuum seal individual
servings of chili, sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a
problem and solved it. I thought I'd pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered
up so they wouldn't seal properly with out wiping them off
prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably
flexible, around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to
the bottom. Approximately 1/2 way so that when you scoop the
food into the tube it falls out the tube into the bag
without messing up the outside bottom of the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides.
Works great.


Steve,

We've been doing that for years but, on the cheap.
We just cut the bottom out of a 750ml yogurt container and use that.
For the really wet stuff, push the seal button before the wet gets to
the sealing strip.
You're right, it works great.

Ross.
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Old 14-10-2007, 05:22 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 78
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find
it useful info.

ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season
with a couple friends and needed to vacuum seal individual
servings of chili, sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a
problem and solved it. I thought I'd pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered
up so they wouldn't seal properly with out wiping them off
prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably
flexible, around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to
the bottom. Approximately 1/2 way so that when you scoop the
food into the tube it falls out the tube into the bag
without messing up the outside bottom of the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides.
Works great.
--
Steve

I'm only half fast so I had to read your post two or three times
to figure out what you were talking about. I just use an ordinary
canning funnel which is designed to fit into mason jars and
provide a decent funnel to dump stuff into. It's a cheap piece
of hardware and lasts forever. Just insert the funnel into the
top of your bag and grasp it with one hand while you dump
your food into the funnel with the other. Voila!, filled bag with
no mess at the seal area.
--
Brick(Youth is wasted on young people)


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Old 14-10-2007, 05:28 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 78
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items


On 13-Oct-2007, Nonnymus wrote:

Steve Calvin wrote:
* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find it useful
info.


ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season with a
couple friends and needed to vacuum seal individual servings of chili,
sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a problem and solved it. I
thought I'd pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered up so they
wouldn't seal properly with out wiping them off prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably flexible,
around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to the bottom.
Approximately 1/2 way so that when you scoop the food into the tube it
falls out the tube into the bag without messing up the outside bottom of

the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides. Works great.


The Food saver sealer I use would still wick the moisture into the
sealed line and make a mess in the collection tray inside the sealer.
When doing something like you're recommending, I put the substance into
small Tupperware-type containers and freeze them first. The frozen
contents can then be removed by a swift 'bang' on the cutting board and
the frozen block of whatever inserted into the vac bag cleanly. Since
I'm gonna freeze whatever anyway, the only additional work is in washing
the Tupperware afterward- but then I have a dishwasher and that makes it
a snap anyway.

Nonny


My method is to fill the final vac-bag using a canning funnel and then fold
over the top and secure with a clothes pin while the package pre-freezes.
After it's hard frozen, I remove the clothes pin and evacuate/seal the bag.
I have the space to pre-freeze. YMMV.
--
Brick(Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 31-10-2007, 07:30 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 23
Default FoodSaver Tip - packaging and sealing wet items

I fold a piece of absorbent paper towel a couple of folds so it ends up being about 1" high by the width of
the bag opening,
insert it in to the vacuum bag across the top, below where the seal will be, and any moisture is absorbed
before being sucked into the vacuum chamber. Works good for me.

David.

"Steve Calvin" wrote in message ...
* Posted in alt.cooking-chat but thought some here may find it useful info.


ok, I'm getting ready to head up to our camp for deer season with a couple friends and needed to vacuum seal
individual servings of chili, sausage & peppers, and stew. And I hit a problem and solved it. I thought I'd
pass it on.

The problem: getting the inside top of the bags wet/goobered up so they wouldn't seal properly with out
wiping them off prior to sealing.

The solution: Find a food grade tube of plastic, preferably flexible, around 3 1/2" in diameter and 9" or
so inches long.

Use: Insert the tube into the bag but *not* all the way to the bottom. Approximately 1/2 way so that when
you scoop the food into the tube it falls out the tube into the bag without messing up the outside bottom of
the tube.

Pull the tube out and seal the bag with nice clean insides. Works great.
--
Steve





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