Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 12-06-2007, 09:34 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs

The local grocery had some interesting looking "country" ribs. I was
pretty sure what they were, but called the butcher to verify. Smith's
takes a pork butt and slices it through the bone to create what they
term "country" ribs. The stuff was $1.49 and I'd guess it was about 85%
meat, with marbling and what had been cap. I got a couple packs and am
going to try it like I do regular ribs. It should be fun.

I do a butt with a bacon fat rub, followed by my dry rub and then start
the hood at 225f with apple wood, dropping to 180f overnight. The last
butt was at 180f when I got up, and the bone lifted out. Cooking time
was 12-1/2 hours. The butt, when pulled, was probably the best we've
ever had. The Mr. Brown was incredible. Ribs, OTOH, I typically do at a
starting hood temp of 190f, dropping to 160-165f in 6 hours. Ribs are
marinated overnight in apple juice, mustard and rub, then sprinkled
before smoking.

The "country" ribs are about 1-1/2" on a side, so they're thicker than
real ribs, but sure not like a whole butt. I think I'll treat them like
some really big St. Louis ribs, and start the hood at 210f with apple
wood, dropping to a meat setpoint of 175f as a compromise. That'll
still break down the collagen, but in 6-7 hours, it shouldn't dry out
the meat too much.

Thoughts?
--
---Nonnymus---
You don’t stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.

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Old 12-06-2007, 11:55 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs

Nonnymus wrote:


The "country" ribs are about 1-1/2" on a side, so they're thicker than
real ribs, but sure not like a whole butt. I think I'll treat them
like some really big St. Louis ribs, and start the hood at 210f with
apple wood, dropping to a meat setpoint of 175f as a compromise.
That'll still break down the collagen, but in 6-7 hours, it shouldn't
dry out the meat too much.

Thoughts?


Treat 'em as grill fodder rather than smoker fodder. Even when I did smoke
them, I think 3 hours was the most I ever went. I could be wrong as I'm
gettin' a little long in the tooth.

I do like them smo-grilled opposite the coals in a Weber Kettle for a couple
hours. They'll have teeth to them but they will be tender enough to enjoy.
I eat 'em plain off the grill, but I can see where this one would be a good
dipper in a sauce.

BlueToe©


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Old 13-06-2007, 12:33 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs


On 12-Jun-2007, "Bluto" wrote:

Nonnymus wrote:


The "country" ribs are about 1-1/2" on a side, so they're thicker than
real ribs, but sure not like a whole butt. I think I'll treat them
like some really big St. Louis ribs, and start the hood at 210f with
apple wood, dropping to a meat setpoint of 175f as a compromise.
That'll still break down the collagen, but in 6-7 hours, it shouldn't
dry out the meat too much.

Thoughts?


Treat 'em as grill fodder rather than smoker fodder. Even when I did smoke
them, I think 3 hours was the most I ever went. I could be wrong as I'm
gettin' a little long in the tooth.

I do like them smo-grilled opposite the coals in a Weber Kettle for a couple
hours. They'll have teeth to them but they will be tender enough to enjoy.
I eat 'em plain off the grill, but I can see where this one would be a good
dipper in a sauce.

BlueToe©


My method is neither grilling nor 'Q'ing', but perhaps it will help your
idea generator a little bit. I rub them with my house run and then
roast them on a rack in a 350°F oven until they look done. I cook them
to the "well done" state and they are always good. Preferred food in
this household. (Thank you for reminding me, 'cause I'm currently out
of them). I serve them with one of my versions of BBQ or Chili beans
and usually homefries or oven fried potatoes. The beans provide the
gravy we like with such a plate.

I see no reason you couldn't smoke roast them at say 275° to 325°
and call them 'Q' when they come out of the pit.

--
Brick(Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 13-06-2007, 12:44 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs


"Nonnymus" wrote in message
...


The "country" ribs are about 1-1/2" on a side, so they're thicker than
real ribs, but sure not like a whole butt. I think I'll treat them like
some really big St. Louis ribs, and start the hood at 210f with apple
wood, dropping to a meat setpoint of 175f as a compromise. That'll still
break down the collagen, but in 6-7 hours, it shouldn't dry out the meat
too much.

Thoughts?


I do them all the time. Love them. I do about 5 hours at 250. Just use
your favorite rub. I do a couple of packs at a time and vary the rub on
some just to make them a bit different.


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Old 13-06-2007, 02:16 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs


"Nonnymus" wrote in message
...
The local grocery had some interesting looking "country" ribs. I was
pretty sure what they were, but called the butcher to verify. Smith's
takes a pork butt and slices it through the bone to create what they term
"country" ribs. The stuff was $1.49 and I'd guess it was about 85% meat,
with marbling and what had been cap. I got a couple packs and am going to
try it like I do regular ribs. It should be fun.

I do a butt with a bacon fat rub, followed by my dry rub and then start
the hood at 225f with apple wood, dropping to 180f overnight.

Nonnymus I am a firm believer in rubbing any meat with bacon fat, or salt
pork fat before you start out. However I always put on the rub and the salt
before the fat. I think it gets farther into the meat.
Just my thoughts,

Kent




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Old 13-06-2007, 04:14 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default "Country" pork ribs



Kent wrote:
"Nonnymus" wrote in message
...
The local grocery had some interesting looking "country" ribs. I was
pretty sure what they were, but called the butcher to verify. Smith's
takes a pork butt and slices it through the bone to create what they term
"country" ribs. The stuff was $1.49 and I'd guess it was about 85% meat,
with marbling and what had been cap. I got a couple packs and am going to
try it like I do regular ribs. It should be fun.

I do a butt with a bacon fat rub, followed by my dry rub and then start
the hood at 225f with apple wood, dropping to 180f overnight.

Nonnymus I am a firm believer in rubbing any meat with bacon fat, or salt
pork fat before you start out. However I always put on the rub and the salt
before the fat. I think it gets farther into the meat.
Just my thoughts,


I'll do that, next time. It makes good sense. I've always done it the
other way, but am open to any suggestions.

Thanks to all for the comments. From what I hear, you seem to cook them
like a butt, but flavor them up like ribs. I'll report back- win or
loose- about the outcome. Right now, they're marinating and Mrs. Nonny
has declared tomorrow to be a steak day. I'll be doing the cooking of
the "country ribs" on Thursday. Thanks, again.

Nonny
--
---Nonnymus---
You don’t stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.


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