Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 09-04-2006, 07:40 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Jenn Ridley wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote:

Sometimes there *is* no choice, OK? Sometimes the only lemons in the
store are the green-y shrivelled up type, OK? (at which point *I*
make a different kind of pie, but not everybody will do that.)


I simply don't believe it. "Green-y shrivelled up" lemons have never
appeared in any store I've ever patronized, on several continents, over
6 decades, buying for both home and commercial uses.


I must be unlucky, I guess. Whenever I look at the lemons in the
local grocer, they don't look like anything I'd like to use for
anything. Maybe I just don't look often enough.

Have a nice day out there in the Hindu Kush or Siberia or wherever.


Try small-town Midwest US. You don't have to get snarky about it.


Jenn, I now live in a rural area that's not even incorporated. It's all
farms. The nearest town, miles away, has the vast population of 18,000
and has remained at that number for decades; never been higher. My wife
and I joke about going to town and picking up some calico and a barrel
of gunpowder and some slab-bacon because we live so far out...

There were more people than that in each of the various buildings I
worked in, in New York. We have several supermarkets and a bigass
Walmart in the villages around here. We have boondocker IGA stores. I've
never seen a green-y lemon in any of them. Never seen a shrivelled one.
Lemons are about as close to bulletproof as it gets in the produce section.

Citrus fruits last months off the tree if handled properly. Weeks if
handled negligently.

Pastorio

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Old 09-04-2006, 08:03 AM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?


wrote in message
oups.com...
What is the reason for grating the lemon rind to make the pie filling?
Do you have to do that?
I have a whole bottle of lemon juice. I'd rather use that than buy some
lemons.

Don't do it! If you want quick and easy use a Jello lemon meringue pie
filling.

If you're making it from scratch use real lemon juice and the grated
rind.

MoM


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Old 09-04-2006, 08:05 AM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?


"Nancy Young" wrote in message
...

wrote

Chris, it gives me great (or perhaps grate) pleasure to know that I'm
not the only one on the planet to think that cilantro tastes like soap!


You are so not alone, sistah.

nancy

And what is this thing with some restaurants sprinkling dill on
everything. Ruined a perfectly good dinner. Yuk, musty dill.

MoM


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Old 16-04-2006, 05:10 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Jenn Ridley wrote in
:

Sometimes there *is* no choice, OK? Sometimes the only lemons in the
store are the green-y shrivelled up type, OK? (at which point *I*
make a different kind of pie, but not everybody will do that.)


No produce stand/store? Only one store?
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Old 16-04-2006, 07:09 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

On 4/15/06, Mike H wrote:

Jenn Ridley wrote in
:

Sometimes there *is* no choice, OK? Sometimes the only lemons in the
store are the green-y shrivelled up type, OK? (at which point *I*
make a different kind of pie, but not everybody will do that.)


No produce stand/store? Only one store?



Welcome to the (concept of) the hinterlands.

In our town we have two grocery stores, neither has very good produce (or
cheese beyond the common ones). The next town up has one small grocery
store. Both have a health food store with a limited selection of produce.
Produce stands exist for about 4 months of the year.

And what is available is grossly overpriced. The local stores feel this is
a resort area, so they charge extra. A "good" price on milk is 2 gallons
for $5.00. Normally, it's over $4.00 for 1 gallon. Everything is about 30%
more than at a store about 60 miles away. However, because of the mountain
roads, that store is not always easy to get to. When I lived in a large
city, 60 miles was "across town," here it's a potentially perilous drive.

When I recently visited my parents in Dallas, I was stunned. At one
intersection there were 6 grocery stores, each of which was larger than both
of the stores in my home town. After a while, you forget the comforts of
living in a large city.

On the other hand, I NEVER lock my car, and we rarely lock the house. I
don't bother locking up my bike. People leave their cars running while they
go into the post office, and the cars are still there when they come out (I
think those folks are idiots, but not because of the risk of theft - they
are burning lots of gas for no reason).

Mike



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Old 17-04-2006, 05:03 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Mike Avery wrote:
On 4/15/06, *Mike H*
wrote:

Jenn Ridley
wrote in

mailto:news:[email protected] x.com:

Sometimes there *is* no choice, OK? Sometimes the only lemons

in the
store are the green-y shrivelled up type, OK? (at which point *I*
make a different kind of pie, but not everybody will do that.)


No produce stand/store? Only one store?


Welcome to the (concept of) the hinterlands.


I understand hinterlands. I live on a farm in an unincorporated area.
Nearest town has 18,000 people and has for the 30+ years I've lived
around here. 10 miles to the nearest (very downscale) grocery.

But I've never seen "green-y shrivelled up" lemons anywhere. And what is
the implication of that assertion, that they somehow came in "green-y
shrivelled up" off the produce truck? At some point, in any stores,
there have to be fresh lemons available. A phone call could easily
enough find out when that would be. If not to the store, to the produce
company. I don't buy it.

In our town we have two grocery stores, neither has very good produce
(or cheese beyond the common ones). The next town up has one small
grocery store. Both have a health food store with a limited selection
of produce. Produce stands exist for about 4 months of the year.

And what is available is grossly overpriced. The local stores feel this
is a resort area, so they charge extra. A "good" price on milk is 2
gallons for $5.00.


I've never seen milk for that price, and this is a dairy area.

On the other hand, I NEVER lock my car, and we rarely lock the house. I
don't bother locking up my bike. People leave their cars running while
they go into the post office, and the cars are still there when they
come out (I think those folks are idiots, but not because of the risk of
theft - they are burning lots of gas for no reason).


Our front door doesn't lock. Only people who have recently moved here
from an urban area lock anything.

Pastorio
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Old 20-04-2006, 01:44 PM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Arthur wrote:
CHI-MUM wrote:
wrote

What is the reason for grating the lemon rind to make the pie filling?
Do you have to do that?
I have a whole bottle of lemon juice. I'd rather use that than buy some
lemons.


Don't do it! If you want quick and easy use a Jello lemon meringue
pie filling.

If you're making it from scratch use real lemon juice and the grated
rind.

MoM

I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my grocery
stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or beeswax product.
No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those lemons whose rind I
plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof, I wonder what I am
accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??


Warm water, a brush, and a minute's rubbing and will get most of it off.

Pastorio
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Old 20-04-2006, 03:41 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Bob (this one) wrote:
Arthur wrote:



I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my
grocery stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or
beeswax product. No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those
lemons whose rind I plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof, I
wonder what I am accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??



Warm water, a brush, and a minute's rubbing and will get most of it off.

Pastorio


Good. Thanks. I wonder how lemons are prewashed at my local cocktail
lounge??? [will that be with a twist of wax?]

-=Art=-
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Old 22-04-2006, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

Arthur wrote:
Bob (this one) wrote:
Arthur wrote:

I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my
grocery stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or
beeswax product. No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those
lemons whose rind I plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof,
I wonder what I am accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??


Warm water, a brush, and a minute's rubbing and will get most of it off.

Pastorio


Good. Thanks. I wonder how lemons are prewashed at my local cocktail
lounge??? [will that be with a twist of wax?]


I've never seen a bartender wash a lemon. Including me.

Pastorio
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Old 23-04-2006, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?


"RsH" wrote in message
oups.com...
Arthur wrote:

I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my grocery
stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or beeswax product.
No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those lemons whose rind I
plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof, I wonder what I am
accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??

Art


Carnuba wax is used on lots of foods... Jelly beans, for example, shine
because they are all coated with it. It is edible and virtually
tasteless, and is a finish protector or sealer, if you will. Don't
bother scrubbing, and simply ignore that it has been used. Its been
used since the beginning of last century, at a minimum, and we are
still ingesting...

FWIW

RsH


Countering:
To say that it has been used for the last century does not mean that it has
caused no bodily harm. Until studies are done on each and every product
that people in good faith say that causes no harm, it's impossible to say
with certainty.
FWIW
Dee Dee




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Old 23-04-2006, 08:28 PM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"RsH" wrote in message
oups.com...
Arthur wrote:

I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my grocery
stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or beeswax
product.
No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those lemons whose rind
I
plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof, I wonder what I am
accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??

Art

Carnuba wax is used on lots of foods... Jelly beans, for example, shine
because they are all coated with it. It is edible and virtually
tasteless, and is a finish protector or sealer, if you will. Don't
bother scrubbing, and simply ignore that it has been used. Its been
used since the beginning of last century, at a minimum, and we are
still ingesting...

FWIW

RsH


Countering:
To say that it has been used for the last century does not mean that it
has caused no bodily harm. Until studies are done on each and every
product that people in good faith say that causes no harm, it's
impossible to say with certainty.
FWIW
Dee Dee

Agreed, Dee. However, think of all the M'nMs eaten!
http://www.food-info.net/uk/e/e903.htm
Graham

Very interesting, Graham. Thank you.
I've not eaten my share of M&M's, but I did stop chewing gum years ago when
I got terribly allergic to a certain brand, won't name it -- big sores! And
stopped using make-up years ago. Didn't agree with my skin.

Interesting - used on/in coffee - wonder what's that's all about.
Dee Dee


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Old 23-04-2006, 09:31 PM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

On Sun, 23 Apr 2006 12:20:53 -0400, "Dee Randall" wrote:

Countering:
To say that it has been used for the last century does not mean that it has
caused no bodily harm. Until studies are done on each and every product
that people in good faith say that causes no harm, it's impossible to say
with certainty.


That is true of every single thing you eat. You're going to get awfully hungry
if you wait until all those tests have been completed.

-- Larry

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Old 23-04-2006, 09:44 PM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 23 Apr 2006 12:20:53 -0400, "Dee Randall"
wrote:

Countering:
To say that it has been used for the last century does not mean that it
has
caused no bodily harm. Until studies are done on each and every product
that people in good faith say that causes no harm, it's impossible to say
with certainty.


That is true of every single thing you eat. You're going to get awfully
hungry
if you wait until all those tests have been completed.

-- Larry


I use common sense and eat food like everyone else. Wax was the topic of
consideration I was addressing. Wax, wax, wax (:-))Dee Dee


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Old 17-05-2006, 11:37 AM posted to rec.food.baking,rec.food.cooking
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Default lemon meringue pie - do you need the rind?

On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 01:39:55 GMT, Arthur wrote:

CHI-MUM wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...

What is the reason for grating the lemon rind to make the pie filling?
Do you have to do that?
I have a whole bottle of lemon juice. I'd rather use that than buy some
lemons.


Don't do it! If you want quick and easy use a Jello lemon meringue pie
filling.

If you're making it from scratch use real lemon juice and the grated
rind.

MoM


I've recently discovered that the pretty lemons and limes in my grocery
stores are coated with some sort of "edible" carnuba or beeswax product.
No one seems to worry about it. I try to scrub those lemons whose rind I
plan to use, but, since the stuff is waterproof, I wonder what I am
accomplishing. Anyone which thoughts on this matter??


Art


Actually, the part that you want most (aside from the wax) is just the
outer layer called the zest. Just the yellow part contains essential
oils that will make your pie taste better. Lemon juice is okay, but
the zest is the best part.

The white layer under the yellow is not needed, and can sometimes be
bitter, and not a good bitter.


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