Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 04-03-2006, 03:55 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

I can cook, but i'm not really experienced in cooking. i am trying to
find some good, easy, and different kinds of recipes. not too
expensive. any suggestions?


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Old 04-03-2006, 04:18 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

Need a little more information. You are asking for recipes for baking that
are good easy and inexpensive? So baking, rather than cooking? So if yes
to baking, then cookies or cakes or bread or muffins or ??? Can you help out
a bit here? wendy
----- Original Message -----
From: "onket"
Newsgroups: rec.food.baking
To:
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 10:55 PM
Subject: I am not an experienced cook.


I can cook, but i'm not really experienced in cooking. i am trying to
find some good, easy, and different kinds of recipes. not too
expensive. any suggestions?

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Old 04-03-2006, 02:39 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.


"onket" wrote in message
ups.com...
I can cook, but i'm not really experienced in cooking. i am trying to
find some good, easy, and different kinds of recipes. not too
expensive. any suggestions?

Look for a publication at your supermarket or bookstore called "Everyday
Food." It is a small format magazine published by Martha Stewart. It has a
month's work of easy, but good recipes that require a minimum of
easy-to-find ingredients. You can subscribe to the magazine at
www.marthastewart.com



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Old 04-03-2006, 04:33 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 14:39:15 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:

Look for a publication at your supermarket or bookstore called "Everyday
Food." It is a small format magazine published by Martha Stewart.


And some of the "food tips" are very interesting. I enjoy the
magazine a great deal.


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Old 04-03-2006, 05:25 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

nice... i will check that out. to be more specific... i'm thinking like
unique pasta dishes or baked pasta, i really like asian foods too, i
really like currey./



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Old 01-04-2006, 04:10 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

Curries = expense.
In order to make good/great curry you will need best quality spices,
which (sadly) do not come cheap! (least not here in Australia!)
For most curries you'll need approximately 6-10 spices (ground:cumin,
coriander, paprika, turmeric; cinnamon; garam masala and chilli.
whole: cumin, mustard seed (black & yellow); cardamon pods and saffron.
I do not believe that the current variety of manufactured sauces are
really any good - the salt content is WAY high and the end result
(daughter makes her own butter chicken from a bottle mix...uggghh!) is
not pleasant. (IMHO)
I have a couple of very nice curry dishes on my website if you're
interested. The recipes can be time consuming - I usually make up 3
different curries at any one time and that gives everyone a selection.
(usually a lamb, a chicken and vegetable one for balance)
May sound like a lot of hassle, but if you make up a large batch, it
keeps extraordinarily well - in fact curries (like most
casserole/stews) are far better 24,48 and (if still around 3 days
later!!) 72 hours superb!
www.members.optusnet.com.au/hotmetal
LadyJane

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Old 02-04-2006, 12:31 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

LadyJane wrote:
Curries = expense.
In order to make good/great curry you will need best quality spices,
which (sadly) do not come cheap! (least not here in Australia!)


I buy mixed, powdered "curry" spices at local Asian markets, here in the
US.I don't get the control I would by blending them from scratch, but
they are inexpensive, and I can find a variety of blends, without buying
a dozen or so indivicual spices.

www.members.optusnet.com.au/hotmetal
LadyJane


Some of these recipes look very good! I'll have to work my way through
them...
A couple of the desserts specify a "packet of suet".
How much is in 1 packet?
Is your suet the same, solid, white animal fat (beef?) that we can
sometimes find? Would an equal amount of lard work as well, given that
lard is considerably softer than the suet I remember?

Dave
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Old 02-04-2006, 06:58 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.


Gordon wrote:

I saw a show concerning curries on Public Television 'America's Test
Kitchen'. They did some blind taste tests and came to the conclusion that
Tome's Curry Powder was the best pre-mixed curry powder on the market.

Gordon in SW Indiana, USA


All well and good if you want all your curries to taste exactly the
same.
Gladly I/we don't. There are an extraordinary number of different types
and styles of curries which suit varied tastes and are well worth
experimenting with.
Bottled pastes and starters are ok if you just want to throw together a
quick (nevertheless expensive) meal. I just think the bottled varieties
have far too much salt which ruins the taste... and bear no real
resemblance to any authentic curries.

LadyJane
--
"Never trust a skinny cook!"
http://www.members.optusnet.com.au/hotmetal

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Old 02-04-2006, 08:28 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.

LadyJane wrote:

All well and good if you want all your curries to taste exactly the
same.
Gladly I/we don't. There are an extraordinary number of different types
and styles of curries which suit varied tastes and are well worth
experimenting with.
Bottled pastes and starters are ok if you just want to throw together a
quick (nevertheless expensive) meal. I just think the bottled varieties
have far too much salt which ruins the taste... and bear no real
resemblance to any authentic curries.


If by "bottled", you mean pre-mixed sauves, I agree.
The curries I buy are a variety of mixed spices, and there is no space
wasted to salt, generally speaking.

Dave
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Old 02-04-2006, 08:31 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default I am not an experienced cook.


Dave Bell wrote:

Some of these recipes look very good! I'll have to work my way through
them...
A couple of the desserts specify a "packet of suet".
How much is in 1 packet?
Is your suet the same, solid, white animal fat (beef?) that we can
sometimes find? Would an equal amount of lard work as well, given that
lard is considerably softer than the suet I remember?

Dave


The suet is actually a blend of real suet and flour, so no, I don't
think lard or straight suet would sub.
The packets (Cerebos/Tandaco manufacturers) are 250g - 44% of which is
suet - the rest is wheat flour. One can still buy real suet from
quality butchers here in Oz, but for those times when you want to whip
up a hearty, winter steak & kidney pudding, or steamed sticky pudding,
this beats racing around town trying to find real honest to God suet.
For traditional steamed puddings you really do need to use real suet if
you can get it!

cheers,

LadyJane
--
"Never trust a skinny cook"



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Old 02-04-2006, 08:58 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 540
Default I am not an experienced cook.

LadyJane wrote:
Dave Bell wrote:


Some of these recipes look very good! I'll have to work my way through
them...
A couple of the desserts specify a "packet of suet".
How much is in 1 packet?
Is your suet the same, solid, white animal fat (beef?) that we can
sometimes find? Would an equal amount of lard work as well, given that
lard is considerably softer than the suet I remember?

Dave



The suet is actually a blend of real suet and flour, so no, I don't
think lard or straight suet would sub.
The packets (Cerebos/Tandaco manufacturers) are 250g - 44% of which is
suet - the rest is wheat flour. One can still buy real suet from
quality butchers here in Oz, but for those times when you want to whip
up a hearty, winter steak & kidney pudding, or steamed sticky pudding,
this beats racing around town trying to find real honest to God suet.
For traditional steamed puddings you really do need to use real suet if
you can get it!

cheers,

LadyJane
--
"Never trust a skinny cook"

Thanks!



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