Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2006, 06:07 PM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default internal temp?

I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-02-2006, 09:34 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,025
Default internal temp?

suzette wrote:
I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz


For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give
an average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-02-2006, 09:12 PM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 545
Default internal temp?


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...
suzette wrote:
I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a
few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and
am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz


For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give an
average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio


Would that temp change at high altitude? Where I'm at, the boiling point of
water is about 203 degrees, which is (obviously) 9 degrees less than sea
level. So if I measured the bread temp, would I want it 9 degrees less (193
degrees) or would I want it to get all the way to 200, which is just 3
degrees shy of the boiling point?

Donna


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-02-2006, 10:37 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,025
Default internal temp?

D.Currie wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...

suzette wrote:

I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a
few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and
am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz


For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give an
average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio



Would that temp change at high altitude? Where I'm at, the boiling point of
water is about 203 degrees, which is (obviously) 9 degrees less than sea
level. So if I measured the bread temp, would I want it 9 degrees less (193
degrees) or would I want it to get all the way to 200, which is just 3
degrees shy of the boiling point?


It shouldn't be altered if at all possible. That 200F represents the
temperature by which the important chemical and physical changes have
happened. Gelatinization, protein denaturing and the other events that
combine to make bread happen at certain absolute temperatures and
pressures. Significantly lower, and they don't proceed to fullness.

For me the boiling point is usually 209F. Changes in atmospheric
pressure will cause it to fluctuate a bit

Pastorio
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-02-2006, 11:50 PM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 545
Default internal temp?


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...
D.Currie wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...

suzette wrote:

I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a
few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and
am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz

For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give
an average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio



Would that temp change at high altitude? Where I'm at, the boiling point
of water is about 203 degrees, which is (obviously) 9 degrees less than
sea level. So if I measured the bread temp, would I want it 9 degrees
less (193 degrees) or would I want it to get all the way to 200, which is
just 3 degrees shy of the boiling point?


It shouldn't be altered if at all possible. That 200F represents the
temperature by which the important chemical and physical changes have
happened. Gelatinization, protein denaturing and the other events that
combine to make bread happen at certain absolute temperatures and
pressures. Significantly lower, and they don't proceed to fullness.

For me the boiling point is usually 209F. Changes in atmospheric pressure
will cause it to fluctuate a bit

Pastorio


Okay -- just curious, anyway. I grew up at sea level, or close enough, so
this high-altitude thing has been an experience. Baking has actually been
less of a problem than things that cook in water.

Donna




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-03-2006, 06:16 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,025
Default internal temp?

D.Currie wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...

D.Currie wrote:

"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...


suzette wrote:


I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite a
few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure and
am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz

For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give
an average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio


Would that temp change at high altitude? Where I'm at, the boiling point
of water is about 203 degrees, which is (obviously) 9 degrees less than
sea level. So if I measured the bread temp, would I want it 9 degrees
less (193 degrees) or would I want it to get all the way to 200, which is
just 3 degrees shy of the boiling point?


It shouldn't be altered if at all possible. That 200F represents the
temperature by which the important chemical and physical changes have
happened. Gelatinization, protein denaturing and the other events that
combine to make bread happen at certain absolute temperatures and
pressures. Significantly lower, and they don't proceed to fullness.

For me the boiling point is usually 209F. Changes in atmospheric pressure
will cause it to fluctuate a bit

Pastorio


Okay -- just curious, anyway. I grew up at sea level, or close enough, so
this high-altitude thing has been an experience. Baking has actually been
less of a problem than things that cook in water.


Long years ago, when I was still young, I was in Tibet. At one point, I
was told we were at something over 16,000 feet altitude and water boiled
there at about 182F. It was surprising how quickly that "hot" water
cooled. It was explained that water was able to evaporate more quickly
because of the reduced air pressure. Faster evaporation means faster
cooling. I had trouble breathing, with any exertion.

The butter tea was too rich for my western mouth. Rice took forever to
cook.

Pastorio
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-03-2006, 01:31 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 545
Default internal temp?


"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...
D.Currie wrote:
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...

D.Currie wrote:

"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...


suzette wrote:


I was wondering if one should strive for a specific internal
temperature
when baking breads, (rye, french, sourdough). I ahve looked over quite
a few
posts and have not seen any relating to this quiry.
I like to make bread every other week or so for my presonal pleasure
and am
new to this group. Thannk you for any help..........Suz

For home baking, an internal temperature in the center of the loaf of
200F says it's done. In my classes, I teach people to poke the
thermometer into one of the slashes on top of a crusty loaf or into the
end if baked in a loaf pan. Quick-read thermometers need to be poked in
almost all the way to get an accurate reading. They're designed to give
an average reading over about 3 inches of the probe.

Professional baking has different criteria for determining doneness.

Pastorio


Would that temp change at high altitude? Where I'm at, the boiling point
of water is about 203 degrees, which is (obviously) 9 degrees less than
sea level. So if I measured the bread temp, would I want it 9 degrees
less (193 degrees) or would I want it to get all the way to 200, which
is just 3 degrees shy of the boiling point?

It shouldn't be altered if at all possible. That 200F represents the
temperature by which the important chemical and physical changes have
happened. Gelatinization, protein denaturing and the other events that
combine to make bread happen at certain absolute temperatures and
pressures. Significantly lower, and they don't proceed to fullness.

For me the boiling point is usually 209F. Changes in atmospheric
pressure will cause it to fluctuate a bit

Pastorio


Okay -- just curious, anyway. I grew up at sea level, or close enough, so
this high-altitude thing has been an experience. Baking has actually been
less of a problem than things that cook in water.


Long years ago, when I was still young, I was in Tibet. At one point, I
was told we were at something over 16,000 feet altitude and water boiled
there at about 182F. It was surprising how quickly that "hot" water
cooled. It was explained that water was able to evaporate more quickly
because of the reduced air pressure. Faster evaporation means faster
cooling. I had trouble breathing, with any exertion.

The butter tea was too rich for my western mouth. Rice took forever to
cook.

Pastorio


I can sort of imagine. Food here cools off faster than you'd expect,
anything cooked in water takes a lot longer, and water evaporates faster
from cooking liquid.

When we first moved here, breathing was a little harder, and I needed naps
to make it through the day if I exerted myself very much. Some people have
problems with dehydration if they aren't careful, and its said that alcohol
has a much quicker effect.

I bought a pressure cooker so I could cooked dried beans or tougher cuts of
meat in one day instead of two.

On the other hand, when I accidentally dumped boiling water and noodles on
my foot, it was still hot enough to do plenty of damage.

Now that I've adjusted to the thinner air, when I go back to sea level, I
can "feel" that the air is thicker.

The one nice effect of the thin, dry air is that in the summer, the
temperature goes down quickly when the sun sets, so if it's 90 during the
day, it's about 60 overnight, so sleeping is pleasant. And the sun effect in
winter is nice, too, so that a 50 degree winter day is nice, and 60 is tee
shirt weather.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PING Chemo the Clown Internal Temp of Pork Loin nurk_fred2000 General Cooking 0 10-07-2011 09:22 PM
BBQ brisket internal temp Gil Faver Barbecue 36 14-04-2009 07:17 PM
Smoked fish internal temp Darek Fisk Barbecue 26 07-09-2005 12:06 AM
Brisket flat not tender after 6.5 hrs, internal temp 205 TT Barbecue 8 02-07-2005 03:00 AM
Internal temperature Wcsjohn Sourdough 1 24-07-2004 02:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:24 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017