Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 19-04-2005, 02:49 AM
Bob Benton
 
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Default Ciabatta texture problem

I used a new recipe to bake my first loaf of ciabatta in months. All went
seemingly well and it rose nicely in the oven but when I cut into it there
was a single, huge void running along almost the entire upper half of the
loaf. What I want, of course, is a nice, open-textured ciabatta, with
something like a third to a half of the loaf consisting of
pea-to-marble-sized voids evenly disbursed throughout. You know, like what
you buy in the store. I've had the same problem once or twice with plain
French bread as well. What causes this?



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Old 19-04-2005, 03:00 AM
Her Subj.
 
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Default

I like my ciabatta with huge holes in it so I can embed pesto and such
in the nooks and crannies, but it sounds like your problem is a dough
that's too wet.

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Old 19-04-2005, 03:02 AM
Mary Beth Goodman
 
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Default

In article ,
"Bob Benton" wrote:

I used a new recipe to bake my first loaf of ciabatta in months. All went
seemingly well and it rose nicely in the oven but when I cut into it there
was a single, huge void running along almost the entire upper half of the
loaf. What I want, of course, is a nice, open-textured ciabatta, with
something like a third to a half of the loaf consisting of
pea-to-marble-sized voids evenly disbursed throughout. You know, like what
you buy in the store. I've had the same problem once or twice with plain
French bread as well. What causes this?



I was just wondering about this myself. I made pain levain the other
day and ended up with lots of regular size, desirable holes but one BIG
hole along the top where the "spine" would be if a long loaf of bread
had a spine.

I think that I've lost something I once knew about forming the loaves.
Or I'm not pressing down the dough enough when folding it so it's got
some air pocket in it.

I hope other people have ideas about this. The bread was very tasty,
but it would be hard to use for say, tuna sandwiches! :-)

--
Mary Beth
Orientation::Quilter
http://www.quiltr.com
http://www.fruitcakesociety.org
http://homepage.mac.com/mbgoodman/bread05/
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Old 19-04-2005, 03:02 AM
Mary Beth Goodman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Bob Benton" wrote:

I used a new recipe to bake my first loaf of ciabatta in months. All went
seemingly well and it rose nicely in the oven but when I cut into it there
was a single, huge void running along almost the entire upper half of the
loaf. What I want, of course, is a nice, open-textured ciabatta, with
something like a third to a half of the loaf consisting of
pea-to-marble-sized voids evenly disbursed throughout. You know, like what
you buy in the store. I've had the same problem once or twice with plain
French bread as well. What causes this?



I was just wondering about this myself. I made pain levain the other
day and ended up with lots of regular size, desirable holes but one BIG
hole along the top where the "spine" would be if a long loaf of bread
had a spine.

I think that I've lost something I once knew about forming the loaves.
Or I'm not pressing down the dough enough when folding it so it's got
some air pocket in it.

I hope other people have ideas about this. The bread was very tasty,
but it would be hard to use for say, tuna sandwiches! :-)

--
Mary Beth
Orientation::Quilter
http://www.quiltr.com
http://www.fruitcakesociety.org
http://homepage.mac.com/mbgoodman/bread05/
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Old 19-04-2005, 03:04 AM
Mary Beth Goodman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com,
"Her Subj." wrote:

I like my ciabatta with huge holes in it so I can embed pesto and such
in the nooks and crannies, but it sounds like your problem is a dough
that's too wet.



Are you saying that if the dough is too wet the air actually rises
through the dough and collects at the top of the loaf?

--
Mary Beth
Orientation::Quilter
http://www.quiltr.com
http://www.fruitcakesociety.org
http://homepage.mac.com/mbgoodman/bread05/


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Old 19-04-2005, 03:04 AM
Mary Beth Goodman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article .com,
"Her Subj." wrote:

I like my ciabatta with huge holes in it so I can embed pesto and such
in the nooks and crannies, but it sounds like your problem is a dough
that's too wet.



Are you saying that if the dough is too wet the air actually rises
through the dough and collects at the top of the loaf?

--
Mary Beth
Orientation::Quilter
http://www.quiltr.com
http://www.fruitcakesociety.org
http://homepage.mac.com/mbgoodman/bread05/
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Old 19-04-2005, 04:12 AM
Bob Benton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I think it was too dry, if anything. Using a KitchenAid on speed 2, I just
kept adding flour until all of the dough cleared the bowl and stuck to the
dough hook. I'm thinking of using the King Arthur recipe tomorrow when I do
Mod. II. King Arthur also says to dimple the loaf thoroughly and vigorously
before it goes into the oven. Maybe he got that fromMerlin.
"Her Subj." wrote in message
oups.com...
I like my ciabatta with huge holes in it so I can embed pesto and such
in the nooks and crannies, but it sounds like your problem is a dough
that's too wet.



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-04-2005, 04:12 AM
Bob Benton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I think it was too dry, if anything. Using a KitchenAid on speed 2, I just
kept adding flour until all of the dough cleared the bowl and stuck to the
dough hook. I'm thinking of using the King Arthur recipe tomorrow when I do
Mod. II. King Arthur also says to dimple the loaf thoroughly and vigorously
before it goes into the oven. Maybe he got that fromMerlin.
"Her Subj." wrote in message
oups.com...
I like my ciabatta with huge holes in it so I can embed pesto and such
in the nooks and crannies, but it sounds like your problem is a dough
that's too wet.



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-04-2005, 07:03 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have had this exact same problem probably three times in the last
year with this formula. I've never really laid it to rest but I too am
leaning towards the 'too much water' theory... though I've long
believed it may also have to do with not forming the final loaf
correctly such that you end up with a continuous air pocket on top
which just blows up beyond control once in the hot oven...

It would be good to hear the 'real reason' from an expert though.



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