Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 03:51 AM
Rina
 
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I have a nine year old grand child... He enjoys every loaf of bread that I
make and He enjoys rolling pizza dough and making pizza, I doubt if his
concentration would last through the lengthy process of hand kneading the
dough. Measuring the ingredients and putting them into the bread machine,
standing on a stool with a flashlight peeking into the little window to see
what's happening all hold his interest for about 10 minutes. We have had fun
making monkey bread, He was able to get his hands on the dough , make the
little balls and roll them in cinnamon sugar. I bake the rolled cinnamon
sugar balls in a bunt pan, it's a great treat for nine year olds! I told him
that some day I'd let him shape a monster ( alligator or something similar)
out of bread dough and I'd bake monster bread for him. This is probably
going to be an April vacation project. that interested him!

Not to be sexist, but he is a boy and enjoys eating the goodies more than
making them!

Have fun with your niece!

Rina



"Priscilla H. Ballou" wrote in message
...

This weekend my nine year-old niece will be visiting me, and the
adventure for this visit is bread baking. (While it's rising we'll
check out what's coming up in my yard.) We will bake her first bread,
and she will take it home with her. It's been ages since I mixed and
kneaded bread instead of letting the machine do it. I do have a Kitchen
Aid with a dough hook, and I want to use that for the mixing, so as not
to introduce the process as one that is *too* wearying.

So, suggestions for a first bread for Emma?




  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 03:51 AM
Rina
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have a nine year old grand child... He enjoys every loaf of bread that I
make and He enjoys rolling pizza dough and making pizza, I doubt if his
concentration would last through the lengthy process of hand kneading the
dough. Measuring the ingredients and putting them into the bread machine,
standing on a stool with a flashlight peeking into the little window to see
what's happening all hold his interest for about 10 minutes. We have had fun
making monkey bread, He was able to get his hands on the dough , make the
little balls and roll them in cinnamon sugar. I bake the rolled cinnamon
sugar balls in a bunt pan, it's a great treat for nine year olds! I told him
that some day I'd let him shape a monster ( alligator or something similar)
out of bread dough and I'd bake monster bread for him. This is probably
going to be an April vacation project. that interested him!

Not to be sexist, but he is a boy and enjoys eating the goodies more than
making them!

Have fun with your niece!

Rina



"Priscilla H. Ballou" wrote in message
...

This weekend my nine year-old niece will be visiting me, and the
adventure for this visit is bread baking. (While it's rising we'll
check out what's coming up in my yard.) We will bake her first bread,
and she will take it home with her. It's been ages since I mixed and
kneaded bread instead of letting the machine do it. I do have a Kitchen
Aid with a dough hook, and I want to use that for the mixing, so as not
to introduce the process as one that is *too* wearying.

So, suggestions for a first bread for Emma?



  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:02 AM
Thomas H. O'Reilly
 
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Well, I can't deny that bread is best when cooled, but I think it's
stretching the forebearance of any child to pull something they helped
prepare out of the oven, and then tell them they can't eat it. Heck, even I
find that difficult. I'd let it cool for ten minutes, but surely serve some
warm. I don't think the off flavors will bother the child, or even be
noticed. And a little butter and jam can hide a multitude of sins.


"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote in message
om...
My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her.
This means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot.
A cup of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right
away, and take one home..


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Priscilla H. Ballou" wrote in message
...
I've become quite an accomplished bread baker with my bread machine
doing the mixing and most of the kneading for me. I use dough cycle
only, though, forming the loaves and baking them normally.

This weekend my nine year-old niece will be visiting me, and the
adventure for this visit is bread baking. (While it's rising we'll
check out what's coming up in my yard.) We will bake her first bread,
and she will take it home with her. It's been ages since I mixed and
kneaded bread instead of letting the machine do it. I do have a Kitchen
Aid with a dough hook, and I want to use that for the mixing, so as not
to introduce the process as one that is *too* wearying.

So, suggestions for a first bread for Emma? I have WW flour on hand as
well as lots of other stuff and will be picking up white bread flour on
the way home. Of course I have yeast, vital wheat gluten, honey, sugar,
butter, eggs, all that other stuff. Even some buttermilk, IIRC. I'm
thinking white bread for her first, although I bake exclusively WW and
other whole grain breads for myself these days.

Recipe ideas?


I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in
the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make and
I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.






  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 07:02 AM
Thomas H. O'Reilly
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well, I can't deny that bread is best when cooled, but I think it's
stretching the forebearance of any child to pull something they helped
prepare out of the oven, and then tell them they can't eat it. Heck, even I
find that difficult. I'd let it cool for ten minutes, but surely serve some
warm. I don't think the off flavors will bother the child, or even be
noticed. And a little butter and jam can hide a multitude of sins.


"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote in message
om...
My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her.
This means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot.
A cup of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right
away, and take one home..


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Priscilla H. Ballou" wrote in message
...
I've become quite an accomplished bread baker with my bread machine
doing the mixing and most of the kneading for me. I use dough cycle
only, though, forming the loaves and baking them normally.

This weekend my nine year-old niece will be visiting me, and the
adventure for this visit is bread baking. (While it's rising we'll
check out what's coming up in my yard.) We will bake her first bread,
and she will take it home with her. It's been ages since I mixed and
kneaded bread instead of letting the machine do it. I do have a Kitchen
Aid with a dough hook, and I want to use that for the mixing, so as not
to introduce the process as one that is *too* wearying.

So, suggestions for a first bread for Emma? I have WW flour on hand as
well as lots of other stuff and will be picking up white bread flour on
the way home. Of course I have yeast, vital wheat gluten, honey, sugar,
butter, eggs, all that other stuff. Even some buttermilk, IIRC. I'm
thinking white bread for her first, although I bake exclusively WW and
other whole grain breads for myself these days.

Recipe ideas?


I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in
the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make and
I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.






  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:20 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


It may well still be warm when we take it home with her. She's staying
over tonight, is a late riser, and I'm taking her home tomorrow evening.

I can't eat white bread because it spikes my blood glucose too high
(type 2 diabetic), which is why she'll be taking it all home with her.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:20 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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In article ,
"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


It may well still be warm when we take it home with her. She's staying
over tonight, is a late riser, and I'm taking her home tomorrow evening.

I can't eat white bread because it spikes my blood glucose too high
(type 2 diabetic), which is why she'll be taking it all home with her.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:26 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Rina" wrote:

I have a nine year old grand child... He enjoys every loaf of bread that I
make and He enjoys rolling pizza dough and making pizza, I doubt if his
concentration would last through the lengthy process of hand kneading the
dough. Measuring the ingredients and putting them into the bread machine,
standing on a stool with a flashlight peeking into the little window to see
what's happening all hold his interest for about 10 minutes. We have had fun
making monkey bread, He was able to get his hands on the dough , make the
little balls and roll them in cinnamon sugar. I bake the rolled cinnamon
sugar balls in a bunt pan, it's a great treat for nine year olds! I told him
that some day I'd let him shape a monster ( alligator or something similar)
out of bread dough and I'd bake monster bread for him. This is probably
going to be an April vacation project. that interested him!


We've already touched a bit on the biology of bread making, and I want
to go into it more, about yeast and gluten and so on. She won't have to
knead it except for a bit if she wants and some at beginning and end to
get a feel for the difference. Emma's got a very curious mind about
many things, including science and nature. Then she'll be off curled up
with a book during much of my kneading, I expect, unless she wants to
stay with me and chat about which cats came to visit her over night.

Not to be sexist, but he is a boy and enjoys eating the goodies more than
making them!


Emma's already made pie crust with her Dad (they made the Thanksgiving
pumpkin pie this past year), and she's interested in learning. Eating,
too, but learning how to do something her Aunt Scilly does is a draw for
her. She's eaten my bread at holidays and likes it.

Have fun with your niece!


I expect we'll have a ball. We generally do. Backgammon is also on the
agenda. I don't think she's old enough yet to handle cribbage.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:26 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Rina" wrote:

I have a nine year old grand child... He enjoys every loaf of bread that I
make and He enjoys rolling pizza dough and making pizza, I doubt if his
concentration would last through the lengthy process of hand kneading the
dough. Measuring the ingredients and putting them into the bread machine,
standing on a stool with a flashlight peeking into the little window to see
what's happening all hold his interest for about 10 minutes. We have had fun
making monkey bread, He was able to get his hands on the dough , make the
little balls and roll them in cinnamon sugar. I bake the rolled cinnamon
sugar balls in a bunt pan, it's a great treat for nine year olds! I told him
that some day I'd let him shape a monster ( alligator or something similar)
out of bread dough and I'd bake monster bread for him. This is probably
going to be an April vacation project. that interested him!


We've already touched a bit on the biology of bread making, and I want
to go into it more, about yeast and gluten and so on. She won't have to
knead it except for a bit if she wants and some at beginning and end to
get a feel for the difference. Emma's got a very curious mind about
many things, including science and nature. Then she'll be off curled up
with a book during much of my kneading, I expect, unless she wants to
stay with me and chat about which cats came to visit her over night.

Not to be sexist, but he is a boy and enjoys eating the goodies more than
making them!


Emma's already made pie crust with her Dad (they made the Thanksgiving
pumpkin pie this past year), and she's interested in learning. Eating,
too, but learning how to do something her Aunt Scilly does is a draw for
her. She's eaten my bread at holidays and likes it.

Have fun with your niece!


I expect we'll have a ball. We generally do. Backgammon is also on the
agenda. I don't think she's old enough yet to handle cribbage.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:27 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:27 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:29 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
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Default

In article ,
"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


If it's cooled enough, we'll have some before we go, but a whole loaf?
That's an awful lot of bread. I can't really eat white bread because it
spikes my blood glucose too much, and even half a loaf is too much bread
for a skinny nine year-old! I don't want to make her sick. Plus, I
don't think she'd want that much. She's a very sensible kid about food.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 02:29 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Thomas H. O'Reilly" wrote:

My concern would be that you want her to take the loaf home with her. This
means she doesn't get to taste it with butter and jam when it's hot. A cup
of hot sweet tea with milk? I'd make two loaves, eat one right away, and
take one home..


If it's cooled enough, we'll have some before we go, but a whole loaf?
That's an awful lot of bread. I can't really eat white bread because it
spikes my blood glucose too much, and even half a loaf is too much bread
for a skinny nine year-old! I don't want to make her sick. Plus, I
don't think she'd want that much. She's a very sensible kid about food.

Priscilla
--
"You can't welcome someone into a body of Christ and then say only
certain rooms are open." -- dancertm in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:29 PM
Roy
 
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Default

Priscilla I started baking also at a young age around 10 years old,
first just watching my mom. My mom got ****ed off with me whenever I
pester her with so many questions.
So to whet up my curiosity, he kept me busy..,prepare the pans,and
other utensils etc.
Whenever she makes bread , she wants me to help knead the dough( which
was for me was fun)., Gradually she introduced me on the basics, I made
by simple white bread and she watch me as I followed the recipe he
simplified for me.
I did not get it right after a few trials, the bread either did not
rise well, taste yeasty and had poor appearance, etc but as I was
persistent and really curious I gradually learned from my mistakes, and
improved my bread. From that she introduced me how to make pies, cakes
, cookies, and pancakes. At a young age I had my share of oven burns,
scalds etc but I was not daunted by the pain, the effort and sweat and
she was really impressed.
I never regret that experience as that was what prodded me to take
chemistry in college as I love mixing things up and working with my
hands, and it was the outgrowth of my deep interest in baking at a
young age.
Therefore from my experience when a kid wants to play around in the
kitchen be sure that is not a flash in the pan or just a sudden impulse
of curiosity to know something but really a sincere desire to learn on
things by themselves.. Let them realize that its not all fun at all
that you sometimes get hurt in the point of doing it.
My mom admonished me several times about the perils of kitchen work but
I was a stubborn kid. Finally my mom relented and that was the time
she' baptized' me to baking by allowing me to help her in the
baking chores. .
If you are a very protective mom, and have a weak stomach for kids
crying in pain as his fingers and skin got burned or scalded, better
think twice before you allow your kid to do the kitchen stuff that
involves baking and cooking.
Always keep in mind, there is no royal road to knowledge and consider
that pain is big part in acquiring knowledge and skill and its more
difficult to teach a kid who had so much curiosity and usually
hyperactive.; than grown up person say a teenager.who has already gain
some form of maturity what kitchen work is all about.
So think about it carefully.
Now regarding the recipe it does not matter, don't ever try to
influence here with your peculiarity such as diet restrictions as that
will tend stifle learning. A whole wheat loaf is a bit difficult to
make than a white bread. Even as a kid it took me a long time to get my
wholemeal bread right than with the white bread.
It is good also that she likes the product he or she makes as even if
it does not come out good she or he will still take pride of the
results and even consume it.
Roy

  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:46 PM
Vox Humana
 
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"Priscilla Ballou" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in

the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make

and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.


Why not just use the basic recipe that came with your KA mixer - the one
that I suggested?




  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 06:46 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Priscilla Ballou" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

I would keep it simple. Use the "basic white bread" recipe that is in

the
cookbook supply with the mixer. WW bread is more problematic to make

and I
don't think small children like WW bread as well as plain white bread.


She likes my WW bread, but I had figured to start with basic (which in
this culture is white) bread. I was just hoping that someone had a good
basic recipe to share, one that I knew was good -- although I can also
just trust Joy of Cooking on this as I do on so much.


Why not just use the basic recipe that came with your KA mixer - the one
that I suggested?




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