Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-11-2003, 08:02 PM
A.T. Hagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Once 0.6 ounce cake of fresh, compressed yeast is roughly equivalent
to one pack of active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons) or to about 1 3/4
teaspoons of Rapid Acting yeast."


I know this won't work perfectly, but I'm trying to get it in the
ballpark for folks who may find themselves with one sort of yeast and
a recipe that calls for another sort. I've never seen fresh cake
yeast for sale here and have used the Rapid Acting (Rapid Rise, Bread
Machine yeasts) only a little since standard active dry yeast gets the
job done for me.

Help me tweak this, if you would, please.

......Alan

--
Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-11-2003, 08:57 PM
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?

.....Alan

Yes, it is true. Check out the home sites for Red Star Yeast and/or
Fleischmann's Yeast
Janet


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-11-2003, 10:01 PM
Graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 01:32 AM
A.T. Hagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 13:57:26 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?

.....Alan

Yes, it is true. Check out the home sites for Red Star Yeast and/or
Fleischmann's Yeast
Janet


That's where I built the text from - Fleischman's, Red Star's, and
SAF's web sites. But I'd like to get a consensus of opinion of
whether it's generally true before I put it into the FAQ.

The more I think of it I'm going to have to make a concerted effort to
try to find fresh cake yeast. I can't recall ever having seen it here
in Florida or Georgia before. Maybe it spoils too fast down here or
something.

......Alan.


--
Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 01:34 AM
A.T. Hagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:01:57 GMT, "Graham" wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


I won't dispute what you say, but the little (very little) info I
could find on this says 25% or thereabouts. Why do you say 33%?

It's the standard active dry yeast to rapid acting yeast and vice
versa conversion that I was most concerned with.

......Alan.

--
Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 03:38 AM
Graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:01:57 GMT, "Graham" wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


I won't dispute what you say, but the little (very little) info I
could find on this says 25% or thereabouts. Why do you say 33%?


Simple mathematics. To convert dry yeast to fast you multiply by 3/4, i.e.,
reduce by 25%. To convert fast to dry you you do the opposite and multiply
by 4/3, i.e., increase by 33.33%.
However, the difference is so little that it won't make a significant
difference. I was just in a pedantic mood.
Graham



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 05:25 AM
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:01:57 GMT, "Graham" wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


I won't dispute what you say, but the little (very little) info I
could find on this says 25% or thereabouts. Why do you say 33%?

It's the standard active dry yeast to rapid acting yeast and vice
versa conversion that I was most concerned with.

.....Alan.

The small amount of conversion difference in the above example is not
necessarily that important. What is important is that the two yeasts are
used in different ways. The active dry yeast must be hydrated before use to
be most effective. The instant yeast is mixed with the flour. According to
Roy Basan just last week, instant yeast has less tolerance to long
fermentation periods. There is also another dry yeast(instant I believe)
that has a greater tolerance to high sugar recipes. I haven't checked
recently, but I believe there may also be a water temperature requirement
difference between the two. So you probably need to do a little further
research along the lines of yeast properties rather than relying solely upon
strict conversion rates.
Janet


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 01:51 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 13:57:26 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?

.....Alan

Yes, it is true. Check out the home sites for Red Star Yeast and/or
Fleischmann's Yeast
Janet


That's where I built the text from - Fleischman's, Red Star's, and
SAF's web sites. But I'd like to get a consensus of opinion of
whether it's generally true before I put it into the FAQ.

The more I think of it I'm going to have to make a concerted effort to
try to find fresh cake yeast. I can't recall ever having seen it here
in Florida or Georgia before. Maybe it spoils too fast down here or
something.


I doubt that spoilage is a factor because all stores are climate controlled.
It is just as hot and humid here in August as it is most of the year in
Florida and we still have fresh yeast. It is usually found in or near the
refrigerator case where dairy products or packaged bisquites are sold. The
display isn't very obvious. In fact, I just noticed the fresh yeast display
in the store were I have been shopping for several years because it is with
the refrigerated buisquite and I wouldn never think of buying them. Our
Winn-Dixie carries fresh yeast, and I know that chain has stores in Florida
and Georgia. Maybe you could try there. I don't use fresh yeast because I
can get active dry yeast for a small fraction of the cost.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2003, 08:58 PM
A.T. Hagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:25:23 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:01:57 GMT, "Graham" wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


I won't dispute what you say, but the little (very little) info I
could find on this says 25% or thereabouts. Why do you say 33%?

It's the standard active dry yeast to rapid acting yeast and vice
versa conversion that I was most concerned with.

.....Alan.

The small amount of conversion difference in the above example is not
necessarily that important. What is important is that the two yeasts are
used in different ways. The active dry yeast must be hydrated before use to
be most effective. The instant yeast is mixed with the flour. According to
Roy Basan just last week, instant yeast has less tolerance to long
fermentation periods. There is also another dry yeast(instant I believe)
that has a greater tolerance to high sugar recipes. I haven't checked
recently, but I believe there may also be a water temperature requirement
difference between the two. So you probably need to do a little further
research along the lines of yeast properties rather than relying solely upon
strict conversion rates.
Janet


Yes. I do mention that if you're replacing Rapid Acting yeast with
standard Active Dry yeast you should still dissolve the yeast in warm
liquid first to get it going. But if you're using Rapid Acting in
place of Active Dry then blend the dry yeast with the dry ingredients
rather than mixing it in with the liquids.

In my baking experience (fairly limited relative to many of you folks)
you end up having to tweak the recipe regardless any time you change
something important like the type of yeast used so what I'm aiming for
is to get them close and then let them tweak to their satisfaction.

I'm still doing Google searches here in rec.food.baking and
alt.bread.recipes on yeast, but haven't found anything on Rapid Acting
yeast needing a different temperature than standard Active Dry yeast,
nor was it mentioned on the yeast manufacturer's web sites that I
looked at so if someone would care to knowledgeably address this I'd
appreciate it.

I did find this though...

From: Roy Basan )
Subject: dough wont rise, help!

If I make bread with powdered instant(rapid rise yeast) I mix the
yeast with an equivalent volume ofwhite flour(omit the sugar)then add
the lukewarm water to make a thin paste, then let it stand for 15
minutes(until bubbly).Another alternative way is to blend it with the
flour before incorporating other ingredients.Sometimes hydration in
water is not desirable(it will leach out enzymes that are detrimental
to the dough as well as glutathione,a reducing substance brought about
by decomposed yeast cells that will weaken the dough).Further these
reducing materials are mostly formed during improper hydration of dry
yeast(or given off by old yeast)including these instant/rapid rise
yeast.


Sounds like with the Rapid Acting stuff you could go either way. Mix
it first with water and some flour (or sugar) or just add it straight
to the dry ingredients.

......Alan.

--
Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2003, 07:39 PM
A.T. Hagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:25:23 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 22:01:57 GMT, "Graham" wrote:


"A.T. Hagan" wrote in message
...
Is the following generally true about interchanging yeast types in
bread making?


"To substitute Rapid Acting yeasts for Active Dry yeasts reduce the
amount of Rapid Acting used by 25% from the amount of Active Dry the
recipe calls for then add the dry yeast to the dry ingredients before
mixing.

To substitute Active Dry for Rapid Acting increase the amount of
Active Dry by 25% over what the recipe calls for of Rapid Acting yeast
and dissolve in warm water (100 to 110F) with a small amount of
sugar before mixing in with the dry ingredients.

Strictly speaking, in the second example you should increase by 33%.
Graham


I won't dispute what you say, but the little (very little) info I
could find on this says 25% or thereabouts. Why do you say 33%?

It's the standard active dry yeast to rapid acting yeast and vice
versa conversion that I was most concerned with.

.....Alan.

The small amount of conversion difference in the above example is not
necessarily that important. What is important is that the two yeasts are
used in different ways. The active dry yeast must be hydrated before use to
be most effective. The instant yeast is mixed with the flour. According to
Roy Basan just last week, instant yeast has less tolerance to long
fermentation periods. There is also another dry yeast(instant I believe)
that has a greater tolerance to high sugar recipes. I haven't checked
recently, but I believe there may also be a water temperature requirement
difference between the two. So you probably need to do a little further
research along the lines of yeast properties rather than relying solely upon
strict conversion rates.
Janet


Ah ha! Seek long enough and ye shall find -

http://www.theartisan.net/yeast_treatise_frameset.htm
Yeast Conversion

The yeast conversion ratio is 100 percent compressed yeast to 40 percent active dry yeast to 33% instant active dry yeast. When converting compressed yeast to active dry yeast or instant active dry yeast in a commercial setting, it is important to take the difference in dry matters into account by making up the difference in weight with water. Table 1 illustrates the conversion from compressed yeast to active dry yeast. (1 oz is rounded to 30 g in the table)

Table 1

Compressed Yeast Active Dry Yeast Additional Water

3 oz (90g) 1 .20 oz (36 g) 1.80 oz (54 g)
6 oz (180 g) 2.40 oz (72g) 3.60 oz (108 g)
9 oz (270 g) 3.60 oz (108 g) 5.40 oz (162 g)
12 oz (360 g) 4.80 oz (144 g) 7.20 oz (216 g)
1 lb. (16 oz) (480 g) 6.40 oz (192 g) 9.60 oz (288 g)
1 lb. 8 oz (720 g) 9.60 oz (288 g) 14.4 oz (432 g)

Table 2 illustrates the conversion from compressed yeast to instant active dry yeast. (1 oz is rounded to 30 g in the table .)

Table 2

Compressed Yeast Instant Active Dry Yeast Additional Water

3 oz (90g) 1 oz (30 g) 2 oz (60 g)
6 oz (180 g) 2 oz (60 g) 4 oz (120 g)
9 oz (270 g) 3 oz (90 g) 3 6 oz (180 g)
12 oz (360 g) 4 oz (120 g) 8 oz (240 g)
1 lb. (16 oz) (480 g) 5.28 oz (158 g) 10.72 oz (322 g)
1 lb. 8 oz (720 g) 7.92 oz (238 g) 16.08 oz (482 g)

The companies specializing in yeast packaged for home baking recommend substituting 1 cube compressed yeast (0.6 oz) for 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast for 2 1/4 teaspoons instant active dry yeast. As stated above, a more precise ratio is 100 percent compressed yeast to 40 percent active dry yeast to 33% instant active dry yeast. Table 3 provides a guide to converting compressed yeast to active dry yeast to instant active dry yeast. (We refer those interested in exact conversion measurements in ounces and grams to the Yeast Conversion Chart. The chart allows home bakers to choose whether or not to include additional water in the conversion.) The ratio of active dry yeast to instant active dry yeast is 1.25:1.


Table 3

Compressed Yeast Active Dry Yeast Instant Active Dry Yeast

1 cube 2 1/2 tsp 2 tsp
3/4 cube 1 7/8 tsp 1 1/2 tsp
1/2 cube 1 1/4 tsp 1 tsp
1/4 cube 5/8 tsp 1/2 tsp


That's a fascinating document. Had to print it out so I can read it
close tonight.

Now I should be able to wrap up that section and put it to bed.

......Alan.


--
Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2003, 03:10 AM
Mk3217
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

yup all right, the water is alittle warm though a good temp is in between 70-90
peferablly 80 but if there isnt a thermometer handy shoot for body temp
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2003, 10:30 PM
wildeny
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is this generally true about baking yeast?

In Alan's first post, the question is about the conversion between
Rapid Acting yeast and Active Dry Yeast. Later some following posts
talked about instant yeast. As I remember, instant yeast =\= rapid
acting yeast.
(at least mentioned in King Arthur Flour's Guide to Bread Machine
Baking and its FAQ about yeast, and somewhere but forgot where)


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
yeast with baking soda? chimera[_2_] Sourdough 0 12-03-2007 01:16 AM
Help baking powder vs yeast Jim Davis Baking 1 11-12-2006 10:35 PM
Self-sufficient in YEAST for baking (and brewing) [email protected] Baking 15 03-03-2005 06:23 AM
Where do you generally buy your tea? etienne Tea 12 13-03-2004 03:48 PM
Where do you generally buy your tea? Warren C. Liebold Tea 7 08-10-2003 10:01 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:37 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017