Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-11-2003, 04:42 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Does anyone make the breads in Carol Field's book that are made with bigas
or poolish that include such a minimal amount of yeast for the biga, with
absolutely no extra yeast added when making the dough with the biga. I
have had failures on everyone of these recipes. Can anyone help?

Dee




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Old 14-11-2003, 05:36 AM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Hi Dee,

You and I should team up to bake; I've never had a failure on a Carol Field
recipe. However, most, if not all, of the recipes require additional yeast.
The Como and Coccodillo breads are the only ones in the front of the book
that don't require added yeast. If you are trying to make another bread
from this book with no added yeast, then it's another kettle of fish all
together.

I've made a lot of the recipes, most of them several times. Which one are
you trying to bake and what's happening?

Barry

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Does anyone make the breads in Carol Field's book that are made with bigas
or poolish that include such a minimal amount of yeast for the biga, with
absolutely no extra yeast added when making the dough with the biga. I
have had failures on everyone of these recipes. Can anyone help?

Dee





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Old 14-11-2003, 07:10 AM
Roy Basan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

"Dee Randall" wrote in message ...
Does anyone make the breads in Carol Field's book that are made with bigas
or poolish that include such a minimal amount of yeast for the biga, with
absolutely no extra yeast added when making the dough with the biga. I
have had failures on everyone of these recipes. Can anyone help?

Dee

I am not familiar with Carols book.
But your question is related to bakery expereince .
Old time bakers usually use very little yeast when making
preferments.And if you use that fermented sponge or biga, you will
need to subject the mixed dough( the biga already in it) to bulk
fermentation for a one to a few hours before you cut it down for
rounding and molding operation.
That is if the biga or poolish use a flour which is just a quarter or
a third of the total flour used.
If you apply this system like a normal dough where you just give it a
short rest after mixing then divide and mold ,the proofing will be
long and the dough appears squat lookin,close grained and with less
volume.
Another efficient way to use it is make the biga from 60-70% of the
flour and ferment that well.
Then when the ferment is ripe( it recedes from the fermentation
container) add the remaining flour with the rest of the ingredients
and make a dough.
Give it a floor time of 15-30 minutes then divide it into pieces,
round the dough let it rest for 15 minutes then mold.
Proof properly and bake.
Making biga and poolish with little yeast in it demands that it
should be fermented well.
The yeast level will be in the range of 0.25-0.5% fresh yeast basis.
Some of these new instant yeast do not have fermentation tolerance as
fresh yeast.
Therefore if you apply long fermentation of your biga with little
yeast use the standard compressed yeast as that was designed for such
fermentation process.
Using a rapid rise yeast and many instant yeast will usually result
in poor performance as instant yeast was designed for the modern fast
breadmaking process.It does not have much tolerance to long
fermentation.
Roy
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Old 14-11-2003, 04:08 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

The Como Bread beginning p. 102, and the Como Bread of the Past, beginning
on page 103, the Pan di Terni, p. 114, Bread of Puglia p. 122, do not rise.
There might be others, but these are the ones I recall now.



I have left the Como Bread 102 even to rise 3 days and it finally did rise,
but tasted pretty awful-flat.



I have followed all instructions diligently with the bigas, leaving them to
set various days. I have used variously a mixer and a food processor. I
think her instructions for the food processor might be out of date regarding
how cold the starter should be before you put it into the processor, as the
new food processors do NOT heat up with the new low speed and dough/low
settings. Do you use a mixer exclusively or do it by hand (I cannot do it
by hand because of physical limitations.)?



Even the ciabatta p. 107, doesn’t turn out correctly. It is more like one
big cracker with a teeny-teeney layer of bread inside. I Have made ciabatta
from other recipes which turned out fine.



I was thinking if I could make the previous ones, I would be able to tackle
the crocodile bread. Before I joined this site, I threw all my notes on
these breads I made of Carol Fields’ and put her book in the back of the
cookbook shelf. What a disappointment. These are the breads I specifically
want to make and EAT!





I have used strictly King Arthur all-purpose flour for my Carol Fields’
recipes, distilled water, active dry yeast, taken the temperatures of my
water, and used “real” salt.



Ah, Barry, what to do!

Yesterday I went to the old “Oster Bread Machine,” and put in a recipe for
oatmeal/rye/barley flakes at dough setting, left it to rise another hour
while the stone was heating and it turned out pretty good, but it is will
never be the bread(s) I really want.



Dee

"barry" wrote in message
...
Hi Dee,

You and I should team up to bake; I've never had a failure on a Carol

Field
recipe. However, most, if not all, of the recipes require additional

yeast.
The Como and Coccodillo breads are the only ones in the front of the book
that don't require added yeast. If you are trying to make another bread
from this book with no added yeast, then it's another kettle of fish all
together.

I've made a lot of the recipes, most of them several times. Which one are
you trying to bake and what's happening?

Barry

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Does anyone make the breads in Carol Field's book that are made with

bigas
or poolish that include such a minimal amount of yeast for the biga,

with
absolutely no extra yeast added when making the dough with the biga. I
have had failures on everyone of these recipes. Can anyone help?

Dee







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Old 14-11-2003, 05:13 PM
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
snip
I have followed all instructions diligently with the bigas, leaving them

to
set various days. I have used variously a mixer and a food processor. I
think her instructions for the food processor might be out of date

regarding
how cold the starter should be before you put it into the processor, as

the
new food processors do NOT heat up with the new low speed and dough/low
settings. Do you use a mixer exclusively or do it by hand (I cannot do

it
by hand because of physical limitations.)?
Dee


Dee,
The issue is not that the food processor heats up, but rather that the
mixing/kneading of the dough causes the dough to warm. This occurs with the
KitchenAid, commercial mixers and more quickly/dangerously with a food
processor because the processing time is so quick. Roy Basan can probably
tell us what happens to the dough chemically with fast mixing and over-warm
dough. I do know that we want the final mixed temperature of the dough to
be (depending upon source) between 75-80F.
Janet




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Old 14-11-2003, 05:30 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book


"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
snip
I have followed all instructions diligently with the bigas, leaving them

to
set various days. I have used variously a mixer and a food processor. I
think her instructions for the food processor might be out of date

regarding
how cold the starter should be before you put it into the processor, as

the
new food processors do NOT heat up with the new low speed and dough/low
settings. Do you use a mixer exclusively or do it by hand (I cannot do

it
by hand because of physical limitations.)?
Dee


Dee,
The issue is not that the food processor heats up, but rather that the
mixing/kneading of the dough causes the dough to warm. This occurs with

the
KitchenAid, commercial mixers and more quickly/dangerously with a food
processor because the processing time is so quick. Roy Basan can probably
tell us what happens to the dough chemically with fast mixing and

over-warm
dough. I do know that we want the final mixed temperature of the dough to
be (depending upon source) between 75-80F.
Janet


I use a FP for some small batches of dough. The friction of the blade does
cause the dough to get warm, fast. I agree it isn't caused by heat from the
FP motor. You can start with cold liquid if this is a problem. One way to
mitigate the heating is to add the liquid until the dough consistency if
right and then let the dough rest for about 10 minutes. Then you can turn
the machine back on to knead. I let the dough ball rotate about 50 times,
or about 1 minute. More than that and the dough gets too hot.


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Old 14-11-2003, 06:27 PM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
The Como Bread beginning p. 102, and the Como Bread of the Past, beginning
on page 103, the Pan di Terni, p. 114, Bread of Puglia p. 122, do not

rise.
There might be others, but these are the ones I recall now.



I have left the Como Bread 102 even to rise 3 days and it finally did

rise,
but tasted pretty awful-flat.


Hmmm.

Let's review the Pane di Como on page 102. I last made it on 7-17-03 and
marked it as Excellent.

Starter:
1 teaspoon dry yeast or 1/3 cake fresh yeast. I used the dry yeast.
1 scant teaspoon malt syrup. I used diastatic malt from the home brew shop.
1/3 cup warm water.
2/3 cup milk, room temp.
1 cup (135 grams) all-purpose flour.

Stir stuff together, add milk and flour and beat till smooth. Let stand at
least 4 hours or over night.

My notes to he

This starter is VERY wet:
224 grams water/milk, 135 grams flour = 160% hydration.

**** Comment: The milk may mitigate the hydration somewhat, but not enough
to alter the general effect.
**** I use tap water all the time. We use city water and have a water
softener in the apartment complex's domestic water lines.

Dough:

2 cups water
6 1/4 cups (860 grams) all purpose flour
1 tablespoon salt
cornmeal

Make a dough with the starter and the rest of the stuff.

This is 35 ounces of flour and 24 ounces of liquid, which is 68% hydration,
give or take. This is a wet dough. The malt syrup will add a bit, probably
enough to offset the solids in the milk. This is probably putting too fine
a point on the process.

First rise: 1 1/2 hours or until doubled.

Shaping and second rise: Shape and rise 1 hour, until fully doubled.

Bake 400F for 1 hour.

Discussion:

This amount of dough would normally have at least a packet of yeast, 2 1/4
teaspoons. I remember that I had some question whether the initial starter
would have enough food supply for the yeast to develop overnight and then
carry the whole load itself with just the one teaspoon, but it did. This
may be due to the malt syrup.

As I remember it, I knocked the dough down and gave it another short rise,
20 minutes, after the first rise. I also gave the dough a rest between
scaling and shaping, probably another 20 minutes, although my notes don't
mention either of these. This procedure is my standard practice in most
breads.

Questions for Dee:

Did the starter work properly, i.e., did it bubble and rise and collapse as
it should?

Check your yeast: Put the yeast, a half cup of water, a teaspoon of sugar
and a half cup of flour in a bowl, mix them up and let it sit in a warm
place for an hour. This should just about blow the lid off a plastic bowl.
As an example, I'm testing a couple of batches of starter -- 5 ounces flour,
3 1/4 ounces water, 1 teaspoon yeast -- one with all-purpose and one with
bread flour. The batches have been sitting for twenty minutes and the first
one (the bread flour one) just blew the lid off.

Your comment that the thing was like a cracker leads me to think that the
yeast isn't active or that you killed it somehow.

How warm is the kitchen and the rising place? It's unlikely, but you may
have risen the dough in a place that was so warm that you killed the yeast.
I doubt this, since you can make other breads work.

My notes on the other two, the Terni and the Pugliese, indicate that I
didn't do much differently from the recipe and that the breads turned out
well. I made the Pugliese on 7-31-01, and have written in the Pugliese from
BBA as a comparison, along with a description of the modifications I made to
use the stretch-and-fold technique, which involves two 1/2 hour rest periods
during stretch-and-fold. In the Pugliese, although the dimples are supposed
to keep the bread from rising too much in the oven, my bread went crazy.

Sorry to take up so much time with such a long-winded answer, but I'm
intrigued that something that's worked for me so many times isn't working fo
r you. If these recipes were something new or experimental, I could
understand it, but these are traditional breads. There must be something
going on that we're not noticing.

Barry


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Old 14-11-2003, 10:16 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

In my sentence, I should reword it to include "THE DOUGH"

as
the
new food processors do NOT heat up THE DOUGH with the new low speed and

dough/low
settings.


Even with the newer processor I have with the dough setting, I do measure
the temperature of the dough not to reach over 80 degrees. So far it never
has.

Thanks very much for answering.
Dee

"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
snip
I have followed all instructions diligently with the bigas, leaving them

to
set various days. I have used variously a mixer and a food processor. I
think her instructions for the food processor might be out of date

regarding
how cold the starter should be before you put it into the processor, as

the
new food processors do NOT heat up with the new low speed and dough/low
settings. Do you use a mixer exclusively or do it by hand (I cannot do

it
by hand because of physical limitations.)?
Dee


Dee,
The issue is not that the food processor heats up, but rather that the
mixing/kneading of the dough causes the dough to warm. This occurs with

the
KitchenAid, commercial mixers and more quickly/dangerously with a food
processor because the processing time is so quick. Roy Basan can probably
tell us what happens to the dough chemically with fast mixing and

over-warm
dough. I do know that we want the final mixed temperature of the dough to
be (depending upon source) between 75-80F.
Janet




  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-11-2003, 11:00 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Thank you for your comments, Barry.

What do you think about using "King Arthur" (DRIED) "Diastatic Malt Powder"
1 teaspoon. I have on hand also "Non-Diastatic Malt Powder."

Yes, my starter worked alright previously. (It is the bigas left in the
refrigerator that definitely don't work for me.)
****
I'm going to do testing on your suggestion: at 16:50 using this:

I'm testing a couple of batches of starter -- 5 ounces flour,
3 1/4 ounces water, 1 teaspoon yeast -- one with all-purpose


My house is 69 degrees.

****
During these biga-making recipes, my house was always cool. When I made the
breads I always feel I erred on the "cool side" because I don't like a real
quick rise, mainly I don't like the taste of over-yeasted bread and that was
the reason for my failures. As Carol Fields says to take the dough out of
the refrigerator and put it into the processor if you are using a processor,
because you don't want the dough to heat up.
****

Your comment, Barry
Your comment that the thing was like a cracker leads me to think that the
yeast isn't active or that you killed it somehow.


I made a ciabatta (another recipe - not Carol Fields') and used the same
yeast. No problem. But I'm testing it at your suggestion.

***

Will get back to you and the newsgroup.
Thanks for your time.
Dee

"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
The Como Bread beginning p. 102, and the Como Bread of the Past,

beginning
on page 103, the Pan di Terni, p. 114, Bread of Puglia p. 122, do not

rise.
There might be others, but these are the ones I recall now.



I have left the Como Bread 102 even to rise 3 days and it finally did

rise,
but tasted pretty awful-flat.


Hmmm.

Let's review the Pane di Como on page 102. I last made it on 7-17-03 and
marked it as Excellent.

Starter:
1 teaspoon dry yeast or 1/3 cake fresh yeast. I used the dry yeast.
1 scant teaspoon malt syrup. I used diastatic malt from the home brew

shop.
1/3 cup warm water.
2/3 cup milk, room temp.
1 cup (135 grams) all-purpose flour.

Stir stuff together, add milk and flour and beat till smooth. Let stand

at
least 4 hours or over night.

My notes to he

This starter is VERY wet:
224 grams water/milk, 135 grams flour = 160% hydration.

**** Comment: The milk may mitigate the hydration somewhat, but not

enough
to alter the general effect.
**** I use tap water all the time. We use city water and have a water
softener in the apartment complex's domestic water lines.

Dough:

2 cups water
6 1/4 cups (860 grams) all purpose flour
1 tablespoon salt
cornmeal

Make a dough with the starter and the rest of the stuff.

This is 35 ounces of flour and 24 ounces of liquid, which is 68%

hydration,
give or take. This is a wet dough. The malt syrup will add a bit,

probably
enough to offset the solids in the milk. This is probably putting too

fine
a point on the process.

First rise: 1 1/2 hours or until doubled.

Shaping and second rise: Shape and rise 1 hour, until fully doubled.

Bake 400F for 1 hour.

Discussion:

This amount of dough would normally have at least a packet of yeast, 2 1/4
teaspoons. I remember that I had some question whether the initial

starter
would have enough food supply for the yeast to develop overnight and then
carry the whole load itself with just the one teaspoon, but it did. This
may be due to the malt syrup.

As I remember it, I knocked the dough down and gave it another short rise,
20 minutes, after the first rise. I also gave the dough a rest between
scaling and shaping, probably another 20 minutes, although my notes don't
mention either of these. This procedure is my standard practice in most
breads.

Questions for Dee:

Did the starter work properly, i.e., did it bubble and rise and collapse

as
it should?

Check your yeast: Put the yeast, a half cup of water, a teaspoon of sugar
and a half cup of flour in a bowl, mix them up and let it sit in a warm
place for an hour. This should just about blow the lid off a plastic

bowl.
As an example, I'm testing a couple of batches of starter -- 5 ounces

flour,
3 1/4 ounces water, 1 teaspoon yeast -- one with all-purpose and one with
bread flour. The batches have been sitting for twenty minutes and the

first
one (the bread flour one) just blew the lid off.

Your comment that the thing was like a cracker leads me to think that the
yeast isn't active or that you killed it somehow.

How warm is the kitchen and the rising place? It's unlikely, but you may
have risen the dough in a place that was so warm that you killed the

yeast.
I doubt this, since you can make other breads work.

My notes on the other two, the Terni and the Pugliese, indicate that I
didn't do much differently from the recipe and that the breads turned out
well. I made the Pugliese on 7-31-01, and have written in the Pugliese

from
BBA as a comparison, along with a description of the modifications I made

to
use the stretch-and-fold technique, which involves two 1/2 hour rest

periods
during stretch-and-fold. In the Pugliese, although the dimples are

supposed
to keep the bread from rising too much in the oven, my bread went crazy.

Sorry to take up so much time with such a long-winded answer, but I'm
intrigued that something that's worked for me so many times isn't working

fo
r you. If these recipes were something new or experimental, I could
understand it, but these are traditional breads. There must be something
going on that we're not noticing.

Barry




  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-11-2003, 11:32 PM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book


What do you think about using "King Arthur" (DRIED) "Diastatic Malt

Powder"
1 teaspoon. I have on hand also "Non-Diastatic Malt Powder."


Should work.

Yes, my starter worked alright previously. (It is the bigas left in the
refrigerator that definitely don't work for me.)
****


I've had trouble with stored starters, too. I now make them all fresh when I
need them. (Knead them? g )

I'm going to do testing on your suggestion: at 16:50 using this:

I'm testing a couple of batches of starter -- 5 ounces flour,
3 1/4 ounces water, 1 teaspoon yeast -- one with all-purpose


My house is 69 degrees.

****
During these biga-making recipes, my house was always cool. When I made

the
breads I always feel I erred on the "cool side" because I don't like a

real
quick rise, mainly I don't like the taste of over-yeasted bread and that

was
the reason for my failures. As Carol Fields says to take the dough out of
the refrigerator and put it into the processor if you are using a

processor,
because you don't want the dough to heat up.
****


I've had such varied luck with "remove the dough from the refrigerator one
hour before use..." that I ignore the time and go by the temperature.


Your comment, Barry
Your comment that the thing was like a cracker leads me to think that the
yeast isn't active or that you killed it somehow.


I made a ciabatta (another recipe - not Carol Fields') and used the same
yeast. No problem. But I'm testing it at your suggestion.


If the yeast works one time then it will probably work another time, eh.

Now I'm wondering if it's just as simple as being a starter that's been in
the refrigerator.

Barry




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 12:40 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed at me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above your test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested it without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee





"barry" wrote in message
et...

What do you think about using "King Arthur" (DRIED) "Diastatic Malt

Powder"
1 teaspoon. I have on hand also "Non-Diastatic Malt Powder."


Should work.

Yes, my starter worked alright previously. (It is the bigas left in the
refrigerator that definitely don't work for me.)
****


I've had trouble with stored starters, too. I now make them all fresh when

I
need them. (Knead them? g )

I'm going to do testing on your suggestion: at 16:50 using this:

I'm testing a couple of batches of starter -- 5 ounces flour,
3 1/4 ounces water, 1 teaspoon yeast -- one with all-purpose


My house is 69 degrees.

****
During these biga-making recipes, my house was always cool. When I made

the
breads I always feel I erred on the "cool side" because I don't like a

real
quick rise, mainly I don't like the taste of over-yeasted bread and that

was
the reason for my failures. As Carol Fields says to take the dough out

of
the refrigerator and put it into the processor if you are using a

processor,
because you don't want the dough to heat up.
****


I've had such varied luck with "remove the dough from the refrigerator one
hour before use..." that I ignore the time and go by the temperature.


Your comment, Barry
Your comment that the thing was like a cracker leads me to think that

the
yeast isn't active or that you killed it somehow.


I made a ciabatta (another recipe - not Carol Fields') and used the same
yeast. No problem. But I'm testing it at your suggestion.


If the yeast works one time then it will probably work another time, eh.

Now I'm wondering if it's just as simple as being a starter that's been in
the refrigerator.

Barry




  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 03:10 AM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed at me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above your

test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested it

without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee

I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every twenty to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4 ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry



  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 04:05 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

OK Barry, my test did not have sugar in it, and as you say yours did not
have sugar in it -- correct?

Well, mine is sitting here at 21:46 and it has since 16:50 (5 hours), room
temperature now about 70.5 degrees, just about doubled in size and has very
few holes in it. Now, my container lid is quite strong and when I popped
(pryed) it off, it let out a lot of air. But I would say, that the yeast
is probably not as good as it should be.
I've put a picture of the starter as it is now at 10:00 pm on a web page so
you can see it.
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Give me your "sage" advice.
Dee


"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed at me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above your

test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested it

without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test

tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee

I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every twenty

to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4 ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry





  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 04:32 AM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

Dee,

The ciabatta and pizza look perfect to me.

No, I did not use any sugar in my starters. Your starter doesn't look too
bad from what I can tell. Mine, at roughly 65% hydration, will flow slowly
if I tilt the container on its side. They both give off a good, clean,
yeasty smell. I'd say you probably have weak yeast, but that's a guess.
You might try adding a pinch of sugar to the starter and stirring it up a
bit. This might kick start the yeast.

I'm not sure whether being old yeast affects the number of cells in the
process or the strength of each cells or both. Somewhere I read that yeast
colonies double every two hours. So, if that's the case, one would expect
weak yeast to "catch up" in some period of time, say two hours. In other
words,you would need a head start of two hours to get the volume and
activity with the old yeast that you would get with the fresh yeast. I
don't know if this is correct, or if it's even generalizable.

Barry


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
OK Barry, my test did not have sugar in it, and as you say yours did not
have sugar in it -- correct?

Well, mine is sitting here at 21:46 and it has since 16:50 (5 hours), room
temperature now about 70.5 degrees, just about doubled in size and has

very
few holes in it. Now, my container lid is quite strong and when I popped
(pryed) it off, it let out a lot of air. But I would say, that the yeast
is probably not as good as it should be.
I've put a picture of the starter as it is now at 10:00 pm on a web page

so
you can see it.
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Give me your "sage" advice.
Dee


"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed at

me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above your

test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested it

without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test

tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee

I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every

twenty
to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4

ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic

container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry







  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-11-2003, 03:21 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Biga breads - Carol Fields Bread book

It's now 9 am and the starter has set 16 hours and hasn't raised or lowered
any since last night. There may be a few more holes this morning. It will
not flow out to the side easily. But it has that wine smell that I don't
like. Sometimes I get this smell when cooking bread; it smell horrid to me.
But I threw it out this test. . I will make another test today using a
pinch of sugar with this current yeast. Then I will l buy a new batch of
yeast Monday and make another test Monday. The yeast I'm using is active
dry -- I think it's Fleischman's from Costco. I open a large bag and put it
in Ball jars in the refrigerator. Perhaps it's been in there too long. But
buying a new bag is the thing to do at this time.

Thanks for looking at my yeast.
I have more questions, but will ask when I'm up and around a little more.
Dee





"barry" wrote in message
et...
Dee,

The ciabatta and pizza look perfect to me.

No, I did not use any sugar in my starters. Your starter doesn't look too
bad from what I can tell. Mine, at roughly 65% hydration, will flow

slowly
if I tilt the container on its side. They both give off a good, clean,
yeasty smell. I'd say you probably have weak yeast, but that's a guess.
You might try adding a pinch of sugar to the starter and stirring it up a
bit. This might kick start the yeast.

I'm not sure whether being old yeast affects the number of cells in the
process or the strength of each cells or both. Somewhere I read that

yeast
colonies double every two hours. So, if that's the case, one would expect
weak yeast to "catch up" in some period of time, say two hours. In other
words,you would need a head start of two hours to get the volume and
activity with the old yeast that you would get with the fresh yeast. I
don't know if this is correct, or if it's even generalizable.

Barry


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
OK Barry, my test did not have sugar in it, and as you say yours did

not
have sugar in it -- correct?

Well, mine is sitting here at 21:46 and it has since 16:50 (5 hours),

room
temperature now about 70.5 degrees, just about doubled in size and has

very
few holes in it. Now, my container lid is quite strong and when I

popped
(pryed) it off, it let out a lot of air. But I would say, that the

yeast
is probably not as good as it should be.
I've put a picture of the starter as it is now at 10:00 pm on a web page

so
you can see it.
http://www.user.shentel.net/jar02/breadbydee.htm

Give me your "sage" advice.
Dee


"barry" wrote in message
et...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...
Barry, I just re-read your yeast testing information.
At 4:50 to 6:20 - when I opened up the container, it only puffed at

me.
But I'm re-reading your paragraph "Check your yeast. where above

your
test
ingredients , you say to put a teaspoon of sugar -- But I tested it
without
the sugar as you mentioned in your next sentence. I will re-test

tomorrow
with the sugar. I want my lid to be blown off.

Will let you know.
Dee
I made the two batches at about 4PM. They pop the lid about every

twenty
to
thirty minutes.

Each has 5 ounces flour (one has AP, the other bread flour), 3 1/4

ounces
water (cool) and 1 teaspoon dry yeast.

If your starter doesn't really pop the top off a sealed plastic

container,
then something might be wrong with the yeast.

Barry











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