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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

drunken fruit



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 21-12-2004, 10:10 PM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default drunken fruit

A long time ago someone gave me a recipe for drunken fruit along with a
starter. I believe it's also called friendship fruit. It can be used as a
topping on desserts
or in cakes or other dishes. I remember that you don't put it in the frig
because that stops the process. I can't find the recipe and would like to
start a batch. Can anyone help me?



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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 12:57 AM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article Ab1yd.4707$113.617@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

A long time ago someone gave me a recipe for drunken fruit along with a
starter. I believe it's also called friendship fruit. It can be used as a
topping on desserts
or in cakes or other dishes. I remember that you don't put it in the frig
because that stops the process. I can't find the recipe and would like to
start a batch. Can anyone help me?



Sounds like Rumtopf/Rum-pot, though I haven't heard of the starter
aspect. I keep on meaning to make it, but I never seem to remember;
nevertheless, I've collected a bunch of info.

I'm told you need at least 108 proof rum, else the fruit (which dilutes
the alcohol) will start to rot. You may not be able to find that
strength, so spike regular rum with Bacardi 151.

Use strawberries, cherries, peaches, plums, pineapple, etc. No citrus.
start in the spring, when the first berries (e.g. strawberries or
whatever come out first) come into season.

Sprinkle each layer of fruit with white sugar (1 cup sugar to 1 quart
fruit). It is best to let the fruit macerate for a hour or two, then
cover with rum.

There actually are Rumtopf pots, but any 3 to 5 quart non-porous
earthenware jar is OK; I think you can use glass so long as you wrap
opaque paper around it (and cover).

Keep adding fruit as it comes into season, using the same technique (and
topping off with rum). The fruit must always be covered with rum. I'm
told that some people slowly decrease the amount of added sugar to 1/2
cup per quart as they progress towards the end (in the fall). I've heard
it's better to add too little sugar rather than too much, as too much
will mask the fruit's taste and you can correct for too little by adding
more at the end.

Remove any stems or pits before adding.

The jar should be closed well, but not sealed: gas needs to be able to
escape without letting anything in. I've seen sources both recommend for
and against blueberries (once source said they turn grey, another simply
said they don't do well). One source says use peaches; another says use
apricots but NOT peaches. Yet another source said not to use apples.

The rumtopf is ready at least two weeks after the final addition, though
if you wait for a couple of months, the flavor improves. You can
separate the fruit from the liquid: the fruit as a topping, the liquid
as a cordial.

Suggested fruits (not in seasonal order):

Strawberries
Blackberries/raspberries
Currants
Gooseberries
Cherries (sour and Bing)
Blueberries
Plums
Pineapple

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 12:57 AM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article Ab1yd.4707$113.617@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

A long time ago someone gave me a recipe for drunken fruit along with a
starter. I believe it's also called friendship fruit. It can be used as a
topping on desserts
or in cakes or other dishes. I remember that you don't put it in the frig
because that stops the process. I can't find the recipe and would like to
start a batch. Can anyone help me?



Sounds like Rumtopf/Rum-pot, though I haven't heard of the starter
aspect. I keep on meaning to make it, but I never seem to remember;
nevertheless, I've collected a bunch of info.

I'm told you need at least 108 proof rum, else the fruit (which dilutes
the alcohol) will start to rot. You may not be able to find that
strength, so spike regular rum with Bacardi 151.

Use strawberries, cherries, peaches, plums, pineapple, etc. No citrus.
start in the spring, when the first berries (e.g. strawberries or
whatever come out first) come into season.

Sprinkle each layer of fruit with white sugar (1 cup sugar to 1 quart
fruit). It is best to let the fruit macerate for a hour or two, then
cover with rum.

There actually are Rumtopf pots, but any 3 to 5 quart non-porous
earthenware jar is OK; I think you can use glass so long as you wrap
opaque paper around it (and cover).

Keep adding fruit as it comes into season, using the same technique (and
topping off with rum). The fruit must always be covered with rum. I'm
told that some people slowly decrease the amount of added sugar to 1/2
cup per quart as they progress towards the end (in the fall). I've heard
it's better to add too little sugar rather than too much, as too much
will mask the fruit's taste and you can correct for too little by adding
more at the end.

Remove any stems or pits before adding.

The jar should be closed well, but not sealed: gas needs to be able to
escape without letting anything in. I've seen sources both recommend for
and against blueberries (once source said they turn grey, another simply
said they don't do well). One source says use peaches; another says use
apricots but NOT peaches. Yet another source said not to use apples.

The rumtopf is ready at least two weeks after the final addition, though
if you wait for a couple of months, the flavor improves. You can
separate the fruit from the liquid: the fruit as a topping, the liquid
as a cordial.

Suggested fruits (not in seasonal order):

Strawberries
Blackberries/raspberries
Currants
Gooseberries
Cherries (sour and Bing)
Blueberries
Plums
Pineapple

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 03:39 AM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help.

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article Ab1yd.4707$113.617@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

A long time ago someone gave me a recipe for drunken fruit along with a
starter. I believe it's also called friendship fruit. It can be used as a
topping on desserts
or in cakes or other dishes. I remember that you don't put it in the frig
because that stops the process. I can't find the recipe and would like to
start a batch. Can anyone help me?



Sounds like Rumtopf/Rum-pot, though I haven't heard of the starter
aspect. I keep on meaning to make it, but I never seem to remember;
nevertheless, I've collected a bunch of info.

I'm told you need at least 108 proof rum, else the fruit (which dilutes
the alcohol) will start to rot. You may not be able to find that
strength, so spike regular rum with Bacardi 151.

Use strawberries, cherries, peaches, plums, pineapple, etc. No citrus.
start in the spring, when the first berries (e.g. strawberries or
whatever come out first) come into season.

Sprinkle each layer of fruit with white sugar (1 cup sugar to 1 quart
fruit). It is best to let the fruit macerate for a hour or two, then
cover with rum.

There actually are Rumtopf pots, but any 3 to 5 quart non-porous
earthenware jar is OK; I think you can use glass so long as you wrap
opaque paper around it (and cover).

Keep adding fruit as it comes into season, using the same technique (and
topping off with rum). The fruit must always be covered with rum. I'm
told that some people slowly decrease the amount of added sugar to 1/2
cup per quart as they progress towards the end (in the fall). I've heard
it's better to add too little sugar rather than too much, as too much
will mask the fruit's taste and you can correct for too little by adding
more at the end.

Remove any stems or pits before adding.

The jar should be closed well, but not sealed: gas needs to be able to
escape without letting anything in. I've seen sources both recommend for
and against blueberries (once source said they turn grey, another simply
said they don't do well). One source says use peaches; another says use
apricots but NOT peaches. Yet another source said not to use apples.

The rumtopf is ready at least two weeks after the final addition, though
if you wait for a couple of months, the flavor improves. You can
separate the fruit from the liquid: the fruit as a topping, the liquid
as a cordial.

Suggested fruits (not in seasonal order):

Strawberries
Blackberries/raspberries
Currants
Gooseberries
Cherries (sour and Bing)
Blueberries
Plums
Pineapple

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 03:39 AM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help.

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article Ab1yd.4707$113.617@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

A long time ago someone gave me a recipe for drunken fruit along with a
starter. I believe it's also called friendship fruit. It can be used as a
topping on desserts
or in cakes or other dishes. I remember that you don't put it in the frig
because that stops the process. I can't find the recipe and would like to
start a batch. Can anyone help me?



Sounds like Rumtopf/Rum-pot, though I haven't heard of the starter
aspect. I keep on meaning to make it, but I never seem to remember;
nevertheless, I've collected a bunch of info.

I'm told you need at least 108 proof rum, else the fruit (which dilutes
the alcohol) will start to rot. You may not be able to find that
strength, so spike regular rum with Bacardi 151.

Use strawberries, cherries, peaches, plums, pineapple, etc. No citrus.
start in the spring, when the first berries (e.g. strawberries or
whatever come out first) come into season.

Sprinkle each layer of fruit with white sugar (1 cup sugar to 1 quart
fruit). It is best to let the fruit macerate for a hour or two, then
cover with rum.

There actually are Rumtopf pots, but any 3 to 5 quart non-porous
earthenware jar is OK; I think you can use glass so long as you wrap
opaque paper around it (and cover).

Keep adding fruit as it comes into season, using the same technique (and
topping off with rum). The fruit must always be covered with rum. I'm
told that some people slowly decrease the amount of added sugar to 1/2
cup per quart as they progress towards the end (in the fall). I've heard
it's better to add too little sugar rather than too much, as too much
will mask the fruit's taste and you can correct for too little by adding
more at the end.

Remove any stems or pits before adding.

The jar should be closed well, but not sealed: gas needs to be able to
escape without letting anything in. I've seen sources both recommend for
and against blueberries (once source said they turn grey, another simply
said they don't do well). One source says use peaches; another says use
apricots but NOT peaches. Yet another source said not to use apples.

The rumtopf is ready at least two weeks after the final addition, though
if you wait for a couple of months, the flavor improves. You can
separate the fruit from the liquid: the fruit as a topping, the liquid
as a cordial.

Suggested fruits (not in seasonal order):

Strawberries
Blackberries/raspberries
Currants
Gooseberries
Cherries (sour and Bing)
Blueberries
Plums
Pineapple

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/



  #6 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 01:28 PM
John213a
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help. BRBR

I think that you are both speaking of different processes. Scott said that 108
proof rum is necessary and from Brewing, I know that yeast cannot exist above
15% alcohol or 30 proof, therefore yeast and 108 proof cannot be part of the
same recipe. In fact to get a "sweet" fruit wine, usually a brandy of the same
wine is added in the fermentation process before the yeast can convert all the
fruit sugars to alcohol, thus both stopping the working of the yeast and
increasing the level of alcohol in the final product. This is why a Port is
higher in alcohol (often 20%) than regular wine (usually around 12%) Scott's
recipe sounds fun to make, but if you are looking for a drunken fruit that has
Yeast in the process, you need to keep looking.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 03:11 PM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks John. You're correct, Scott's recipe does sound fun to make and I am
still looking.

"John213a" wrote in message
...
Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt
it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have
was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit
recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help. BRBR

I think that you are both speaking of different processes. Scott said
that 108
proof rum is necessary and from Brewing, I know that yeast cannot exist
above
15% alcohol or 30 proof, therefore yeast and 108 proof cannot be part of
the
same recipe. In fact to get a "sweet" fruit wine, usually a brandy of the
same
wine is added in the fermentation process before the yeast can convert all
the
fruit sugars to alcohol, thus both stopping the working of the yeast and
increasing the level of alcohol in the final product. This is why a Port
is
higher in alcohol (often 20%) than regular wine (usually around 12%)
Scott's
recipe sounds fun to make, but if you are looking for a drunken fruit that
has
Yeast in the process, you need to keep looking.



  #8 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 03:11 PM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks John. You're correct, Scott's recipe does sound fun to make and I am
still looking.

"John213a" wrote in message
...
Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt
it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have
was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit
recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help. BRBR

I think that you are both speaking of different processes. Scott said
that 108
proof rum is necessary and from Brewing, I know that yeast cannot exist
above
15% alcohol or 30 proof, therefore yeast and 108 proof cannot be part of
the
same recipe. In fact to get a "sweet" fruit wine, usually a brandy of the
same
wine is added in the fermentation process before the yeast can convert all
the
fruit sugars to alcohol, thus both stopping the working of the yeast and
increasing the level of alcohol in the final product. This is why a Port
is
higher in alcohol (often 20%) than regular wine (usually around 12%)
Scott's
recipe sounds fun to make, but if you are looking for a drunken fruit that
has
Yeast in the process, you need to keep looking.



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 03:38 PM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article 506yd.4729$113.1792@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help.


Ah, well, if it used yeast, it's not rumptopf. I did a Google search and
found a ton of recipes for Drunken Fruit. I *did* find one variant that
called it Rum Pot, though (even though it technically isn't). The second
recipe seems to be more "proven."


http://www.k2labs.org/kungfusion/vineyard/recipes/RumPot.htm
Rum Pot
Sometimes called "Drunken Fruit", this delicious mix grows and grows.
When it gets going, you can give it to friends 1 cup at a time. Always
leave 1 cup for yourself.

1 cup Canned Fruit Cocktail
1 cup Sugar
1 pinch Wine yeast
Liquor (Optional)

METHOD:
1. Put fruit, then sugar in a glass jar or small crock (1 qt.) Sprinkle
on a pinch of yeast. Partly cover.
2. After 24 hours, stir.
3. Let sit partly covered for 2 weeks.
4. Add 1 cup fruit and 1 cup sugar. Partly cover, let sit 2 weeks.
5. Repeat step 4 as required. Keep at room temperature. Refrigerate to
stop action.
Add to ice cream, pudding, or use as a glaze. Also excellent with a
touch of brandy, white wine, creme de menthe or Galliano.

------------------------------------*
http://www.joycesfinecooking.com/Recipes4/drunken_fruit.htm*
Drunken Fruit
Note: I have had this recipe for years, and I have constantly kept this
mixture in a pretty, heavy, clear glass jar with a loose-fitting lid on
my kitchen counter. Sometimes I drain the fruit and use it in a fruit
cocktail cake recipe. I use the drained juice as a substitute for liquid
in the recipe. It's absolutely delicious. I usually serve it over ice
cream.

This is good served over ice cream or pound cake.

1 envelope yeast
1/4 C. warm water
1 C. sliced canned peaches
1 C. canned pineapple chunks
1 C. apricot halves, drained
3 C. sugar
1/2 C. brandy
1 C. red maraschino cherries, with juice

Drain peaches and pineapple. Dissolve yeast in warm water. Place all
ingredients in a loosely-sealed jar. Keep in a warm, preferably dark,
spot. NEVER use a metal spoon in this fruit. Never let the fruit get
under less than 3 cups. Every two weeks add 1 cup sugar and 1 cup
drained fruit (if using maraschino cherries, use the juice also). You
may substitute pear slices or Mandarin orange slices.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 22-12-2004, 04:10 PM
Retta
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Great Scott, Scott!! I can't thank you and google (whoever he is) enough.
The recipes remind me very much of what I had. Needless to say I am going to
get the fixins and start one tomorrow. Thanks again very much and Merry
Christmas and a Happy New year to you.

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article 506yd.4729$113.1792@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have
was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit
recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help.


Ah, well, if it used yeast, it's not rumptopf. I did a Google search and
found a ton of recipes for Drunken Fruit. I *did* find one variant that
called it Rum Pot, though (even though it technically isn't). The second
recipe seems to be more "proven."


http://www.k2labs.org/kungfusion/vineyard/recipes/RumPot.htm
Rum Pot
Sometimes called "Drunken Fruit", this delicious mix grows and grows.
When it gets going, you can give it to friends 1 cup at a time. Always
leave 1 cup for yourself.

1 cup Canned Fruit Cocktail
1 cup Sugar
1 pinch Wine yeast
Liquor (Optional)

METHOD:
1. Put fruit, then sugar in a glass jar or small crock (1 qt.) Sprinkle
on a pinch of yeast. Partly cover.
2. After 24 hours, stir.
3. Let sit partly covered for 2 weeks.
4. Add 1 cup fruit and 1 cup sugar. Partly cover, let sit 2 weeks.
5. Repeat step 4 as required. Keep at room temperature. Refrigerate to
stop action.
Add to ice cream, pudding, or use as a glaze. Also excellent with a
touch of brandy, white wine, creme de menthe or Galliano.

------------------------------------
http://www.joycesfinecooking.com/Recipes4/drunken_fruit.htm
Drunken Fruit
Note: I have had this recipe for years, and I have constantly kept this
mixture in a pretty, heavy, clear glass jar with a loose-fitting lid on
my kitchen counter. Sometimes I drain the fruit and use it in a fruit
cocktail cake recipe. I use the drained juice as a substitute for liquid
in the recipe. It's absolutely delicious. I usually serve it over ice
cream.

This is good served over ice cream or pound cake.

1 envelope yeast
1/4 C. warm water
1 C. sliced canned peaches
1 C. canned pineapple chunks
1 C. apricot halves, drained
3 C. sugar
1/2 C. brandy
1 C. red maraschino cherries, with juice

Drain peaches and pineapple. Dissolve yeast in warm water. Place all
ingredients in a loosely-sealed jar. Keep in a warm, preferably dark,
spot. NEVER use a metal spoon in this fruit. Never let the fruit get
under less than 3 cups. Every two weeks add 1 cup sugar and 1 cup
drained fruit (if using maraschino cherries, use the juice also). You
may substitute pear slices or Mandarin orange slices.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/



  #11 (permalink)  
Old 23-12-2004, 01:38 AM
Skinny
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I wonder if either these or Rumtopf could be made low-carb, perhaps with all
the sugar eventually turned into alcohol?


Skinny
----------------


On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 10:38:40 -0500, Scott wrote:

In article 506yd.4729$113.1792@trndny03,
"Retta" wrote:

Thank you very much Scott. After printing out and reading your receipt

it
made me remember that one of the ingredients in the recipe I use to have

was
yeast. Do you know anything about a Rumtopf/Rum-pot or Drunken Fruit

recipe
with yeast? Thanks again for your help.


Ah, well, if it used yeast, it's not rumptopf. I did a Google search and
found a ton of recipes for Drunken Fruit. I *did* find one variant that
called it Rum Pot, though (even though it technically isn't). The second
recipe seems to be more "proven."


http://www.k2labs.org/kungfusion/vineyard/recipes/RumPot.htm
Rum Pot
Sometimes called "Drunken Fruit", this delicious mix grows and grows.
When it gets going, you can give it to friends 1 cup at a time. Always
leave 1 cup for yourself.

1 cup Canned Fruit Cocktail
1 cup Sugar
1 pinch Wine yeast
Liquor (Optional)

METHOD:
1. Put fruit, then sugar in a glass jar or small crock (1 qt.) Sprinkle
on a pinch of yeast. Partly cover.
2. After 24 hours, stir.
3. Let sit partly covered for 2 weeks.
4. Add 1 cup fruit and 1 cup sugar. Partly cover, let sit 2 weeks.
5. Repeat step 4 as required. Keep at room temperature. Refrigerate to
stop action.
Add to ice cream, pudding, or use as a glaze. Also excellent with a
touch of brandy, white wine, creme de menthe or Galliano.

------------------------------------*
http://www.joycesfinecooking.com/Recipes4/drunken_fruit.htm*
Drunken Fruit
Note: I have had this recipe for years, and I have constantly kept this
mixture in a pretty, heavy, clear glass jar with a loose-fitting lid on
my kitchen counter. Sometimes I drain the fruit and use it in a fruit
cocktail cake recipe. I use the drained juice as a substitute for liquid
in the recipe. It's absolutely delicious. I usually serve it over ice
cream.

This is good served over ice cream or pound cake.

1 envelope yeast
1/4 C. warm water
1 C. sliced canned peaches
1 C. canned pineapple chunks
1 C. apricot halves, drained
3 C. sugar
1/2 C. brandy
1 C. red maraschino cherries, with juice

Drain peaches and pineapple. Dissolve yeast in warm water. Place all
ingredients in a loosely-sealed jar. Keep in a warm, preferably dark,
spot. NEVER use a metal spoon in this fruit. Never let the fruit get
under less than 3 cups. Every two weeks add 1 cup sugar and 1 cup
drained fruit (if using maraschino cherries, use the juice also). You
may substitute pear slices or Mandarin orange slices.

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 23-12-2004, 02:23 AM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article 30hyd.7452$152.7429@trndny01,
"Retta" wrote:

Great Scott, Scott!! I can't thank you and google (whoever he is) enough.
The recipes remind me very much of what I had. Needless to say I am going to
get the fixins and start one tomorrow. Thanks again very much and Merry
Christmas and a Happy New year to you.



You're welcome. Just two thoughts:
1) Google is your friend.
www.google.com

2) if there's a homebrewing store around you, I think you'd do better if
you can find wine yeast to use, rather than baker's: the wine yeast
should give it a cleaner taste. Check your yellow pages.


Gut yuntif.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
 




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