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Mexican Cooking (alt.food.mexican-cooking) A newsgroup created for the discussion and sharing of mexican food and recipes.

Mexican vs. Key limes



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 28-04-2009, 12:04 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default Mexican vs. Key limes

I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of
Mexican vs. key limes. I've got a lime tree growing in my back yard
with growth from below and above a graft. I've never been able to
determine the type of limes growing on my tree. Both ripen to yellow.
One fruit is lime like (round with thin skin) and the other is more
lemon like (oblong with pointed ends and thicker skin). Neither
resembles a typical "grocery store" lemon in size, rind or flesh color.
The "round" one has a "store bought" lime flavor when used green, the
oblong one other does not. Both become sweeter as they ripen. I'd like
to figure out what kind of limes they are. Any help would be appreciated.

Rich
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 28-04-2009, 03:38 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 726
Default Mexican vs. Key limes

Smart money says a Mexican can kick a key limes ass


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 28-04-2009, 03:55 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 96
Default Mexican vs. Key limes

"I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of
Mexican vs. key limes." The writer had it mixed up -- Mexican limes
are Key limes. They have seeds.

The lime most commonly found in the USA is the seedless Persian lime.

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 28-04-2009, 02:49 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Posts: 4,445
Default Mexican vs. Key limes


"Rich" wrote in message
...
I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of Mexican
vs. key limes. I've got a lime tree growing in my back yard with growth
from below and above a graft. I've never been able to determine the type
of limes growing on my tree. Both ripen to yellow. One fruit is lime like
(round with thin skin) and the other is more lemon like (oblong with
pointed ends and thicker skin). Neither resembles a typical "grocery
store" lemon in size, rind or flesh color. The "round" one has a "store
bought" lime flavor when used green, the oblong one other does not. Both
become sweeter as they ripen. I'd like to figure out what kind of limes
they are. Any help would be appreciated.

Rich


http://www.thenibble.com/REVIEWS/mai...f-lime.asp#key


Page 2

Key Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle). Also known as the Mexican lime, West
Indies lime and Bartender's lime, the highly-aromatic Key lime is grown in
the Florida Keys, Mexico and the West Indies. It is smaller and round, the
size of a ping pong ball, and more fragrant and less acidic. The color can
range from a regular lime green to yellow in color, depending on ripeness.
Those not familiar with it can mistake it for a lemon, but the skin is
smooth, thin-skinned and full of small seeds. It also has a distinct, tart,
but less acid, juice than the Persian lime. Both are the only two limes,
acid or sour, that are commercially grown.

Dimitri

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-07-2009, 08:46 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimitri View Post
"Rich" wrote in message
...
I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of Mexican
vs. key limes. I've got a lime tree growing in my back yard with growth
from below and above a graft. I've never been able to determine the type
of limes growing on my tree. Both ripen to yellow. One fruit is lime like
(round with thin skin) and the other is more lemon like (oblong with
pointed ends and thicker skin). Neither resembles a typical "grocery
store" lemon in size, rind or flesh color. The "round" one has a "store
bought" lime flavor when used green, the oblong one other does not. Both
become sweeter as they ripen. I'd like to figure out what kind of limes
they are. Any help would be appreciated.

Rich


Limes


Page 2

Key Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle). Also known as the Mexican lime, West
Indies lime and Bartender's lime, the highly-aromatic Key lime is grown in
the Florida Keys, Mexico and the West Indies. It is smaller and round, the
size of a ping pong ball, and more fragrant and less acidic. The color can
range from a regular lime green to yellow in color, depending on ripeness.
Those not familiar with it can mistake it for a lemon, but the skin is
smooth, thin-skinned and full of small seeds. It also has a distinct, tart,
but less acid, juice than the Persian lime. Both are the only two limes,
acid or sour, that are commercially grown.

Dimitri
http://www.b2cwatch.com provides excellent customer service and extraordinary merchandise. We wish to inform and educate our customers on the historical and collectable values of Rolex and to help direct you in the important acquisition of a Rolex watch.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-02-2010, 04:15 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich[_7_] View Post
I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of
Mexican vs. key limes. I've got a lime tree growing in my back yard
with growth from below and above a graft. I've never been able to
determine the type of limes growing on my tree. Both ripen to yellow.
One fruit is lime like (round with thin skin) and the other is more
lemon like (oblong with pointed ends and thicker skin). Neither
resembles a typical "grocery store" lemon in size, rind or flesh color.
The "round" one has a "store bought" lime flavor when used green, the
oblong one other does not. Both become sweeter as they ripen. I'd like
to figure out what kind of limes they are. Any help would be appreciated.

Rich
Thank you for the post.
Hi guys, Im a newbie. Nice to join this forum.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-02-2010, 08:35 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4
Default

I find Mexican lime and Key lime are seeds but both terms are often used interchangeably by users until they know the main difference.

The Key lime (Citrus aurantiifolia, Citrus aurantifolia, or Citrus x aurantiifolia (Christm.) Swingle), is well known as the Mexican lime, West Indian lime or Bartender's lime, has a globose fruit, 2.5-5 cm in diameter (1-2 in), that is yellow when ripe but usually picked green. It is smaller, seedier, has a higher acidity, a stronger aroma, and a thinner rind than that of the more common Persian lime. It is valued for its unique flavor compared to other limes, with the key lime usually having a more tart and bitter flavor. It is perhaps most distinguished as an ingredient in the Key lime pie.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich[_7_] View Post
I saw a margarita recipe on rec.food.cooking that made mention of
Mexican vs. key limes. I've got a lime tree growing in my back yard
with growth from below and above a graft. I've never been able to
determine the type of limes growing on my tree. Both ripen to yellow.
One fruit is lime like (round with thin skin) and the other is more
lemon like (oblong with pointed ends and thicker skin). Neither
resembles a typical "grocery store" lemon in size, rind or flesh color.
The "round" one has a "store bought" lime flavor when used green, the
oblong one other does not. Both become sweeter as they ripen. I'd like
to figure out what kind of limes they are. Any help would be appreciated.

Rich
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 26-05-2010, 11:50 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 9
Talking

Cool, thanks for all the information. Goes to show that you learn something new everyday!
 




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