Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
before capping them to minimize the amount of air??

Thanks,

--Eric


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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

On Sun, 3 Sep 2006 23:22:41 -0400, "Eric Paradisi"
> wrote:

>Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
>I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
>get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
>before capping them to minimize the amount of air??
>
>Thanks,
>
>--Eric
>

Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
wine industry.

I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
quality of the wine as well.)
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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines built
for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the world in
promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the Aussies, and
some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites - I'm not willing
tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age similarly to under
a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah and Cab blends.


>>

> Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
> embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
> wine industry.
>
> I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
> some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
> warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
> quality of the wine as well.)



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the believe
that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in screw cap
bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly harvested corks
from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They are accepted the
aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork was
found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with aluminums
screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get new aluminums
screw caps and suitable bottles.


"Ric" > wrote in message
m...
> Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines built
> for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the world in
> promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the Aussies, and
> some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites - I'm not
> willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age similarly
> to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah and Cab
> blends.
>
>
>>>

>> Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>> embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>> wine industry.
>>
>> I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>> some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>> warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>> quality of the wine as well.)

>
>



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

.... My problem is to get new aluminums
> screw caps and suitable bottles.


Marie,
That is just not going to happen, the aluminum screw caps are machine
applied and crimped right on the bottle. That's why it's such a good
seal. I'm not aware of a homewinemaking screw-cap machine.

That said, there are two versions of screw caps for winebottles
available. One has a normal looking liner, the other has a poly
'dimple' that goes into the bottle forming a higher quality seal from
what I have been told. The cost difference is very small, you may want
to look for those. I use them on vinegar.

Joe



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Here they only screw caps available are made of plastic. I have talk to the
representative of a major plastic caps manufacturing company. He stated
that the bulk of their business is for the soft drink industries. I am not
too comfortable with these ordinary plastic caps. As you have stated the
aluminums caps are rolled and crimped on the bottle. Correct me if I am
wrong but the principle is the same as making light bulk base socket. May
be some retired tools maker will come on will a modified aluminums
gimping/rolling die for home bottling use?

"Joe Sallustio" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> ... My problem is to get new aluminums
>> screw caps and suitable bottles.

>
> Marie,
> That is just not going to happen, the aluminum screw caps are machine
> applied and crimped right on the bottle. That's why it's such a good
> seal. I'm not aware of a homewinemaking screw-cap machine.
>
> That said, there are two versions of screw caps for winebottles
> available. One has a normal looking liner, the other has a poly
> 'dimple' that goes into the bottle forming a higher quality seal from
> what I have been told. The cost difference is very small, you may want
> to look for those. I use them on vinegar.
>
> Joe
>



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine


"Eric Paradisi" > wrote in message
news:G3NKg.10004$xk3.6899@dukeread07...
> Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
> I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
> get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
> before capping them to minimize the amount of air??


Agh! I just cannot get used to the idea of screw caps on a good wine.
It really takes the romance out of it.
Can you imagine going out to a nice dinner with someone and having
the waiter unscrew the top of your wine? Perhaps I should print up some
"I will give up my corker when they pry my cold dead fingers from around
it."
bumber stickers.



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

I would not be too hasty in condeming cork. Sure, there have been some
problems in the past but I think the source of the problem(s) have been
identified and probably corrected in most cases. I read a recent article
that said srew cap wines contained a higher percentage of sulphur compounds
and other reducing compounds compared to corked bottles. Screw top may be
good for whites but I don't think the verdict is entirely in on long term
storage of reds.


> wrote in message
...
> The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
> years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
> are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
> good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
> aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the
> believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in
> screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly
> harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They
> are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
> It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
> years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork
> was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with
> aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get
> new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>
>
> "Ric" > wrote in message
> m...
>> Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>> built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the world
>> in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the Aussies,
>> and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites - I'm not
>> willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age
>> similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah
>> and Cab blends.
>>
>>
>>>>
>>> Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>> embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>> wine industry.
>>>
>>> I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>> some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>> warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>> quality of the wine as well.)

>>
>>

>
>



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Thanks to Everyone for all you input. I am not a big Red drinker so my
plans are with fruit wines, Riesling, and White Zin. Thanks Again!!

"Eric Paradisi" > wrote in message
news:G3NKg.10004$xk3.6899@dukeread07...
> Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
> I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
> get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
> before capping them to minimize the amount of air??
>
> Thanks,
>
> --Eric
>
>



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Do you think we'll be able to afford one of those tool-and-die-maker
models? <grin>
Gene

wrote:
> Here they only screw caps available are made of plastic. I have talk to the
> representative of a major plastic caps manufacturing company. He stated
> that the bulk of their business is for the soft drink industries. I am not
> too comfortable with these ordinary plastic caps. As you have stated the
> aluminums caps are rolled and crimped on the bottle. Correct me if I am
> wrong but the principle is the same as making light bulk base socket. May
> be some retired tools maker will come on will a modified aluminums
> gimping/rolling die for home bottling use?
>
> "Joe Sallustio" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
>
>>... My problem is to get new aluminums
>>
>>>screw caps and suitable bottles.

>>
>>Marie,
>>That is just not going to happen, the aluminum screw caps are machine
>>applied and crimped right on the bottle. That's why it's such a good
>>seal. I'm not aware of a homewinemaking screw-cap machine.
>>
>>That said, there are two versions of screw caps for winebottles
>>available. One has a normal looking liner, the other has a poly
>>'dimple' that goes into the bottle forming a higher quality seal from
>>what I have been told. The cost difference is very small, you may want
>>to look for those. I use them on vinegar.
>>
>>Joe
>>

>
>
>



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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

All is needed is a tool and die designer to create the tool and China to
fabricate it. I am curious to find what's at the patent office already?

"gene" > wrote in message
t...
> Do you think we'll be able to afford one of those tool-and-die-maker
> models? <grin>
> Gene
>
> wrote:
>> Here they only screw caps available are made of plastic. I have talk to
>> the representative of a major plastic caps manufacturing company. He
>> stated that the bulk of their business is for the soft drink industries.
>> I am not too comfortable with these ordinary plastic caps. As you have
>> stated the aluminums caps are rolled and crimped on the bottle. Correct
>> me if I am wrong but the principle is the same as making light bulk base
>> socket. May be some retired tools maker will come on will a modified
>> aluminums gimping/rolling die for home bottling use?
>>
>> "Joe Sallustio" > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>>
>>>... My problem is to get new aluminums
>>>
>>>>screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>
>>>Marie,
>>>That is just not going to happen, the aluminum screw caps are machine
>>>applied and crimped right on the bottle. That's why it's such a good
>>>seal. I'm not aware of a homewinemaking screw-cap machine.
>>>
>>>That said, there are two versions of screw caps for winebottles
>>>available. One has a normal looking liner, the other has a poly
>>>'dimple' that goes into the bottle forming a higher quality seal from
>>>what I have been told. The cost difference is very small, you may want
>>>to look for those. I use them on vinegar.
>>>
>>>Joe
>>>

>>
>>


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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

I'll buy one and put it on my car!!! smile. I've never put a bumper
sticker on my car, but that one... I like. haha.

I get a lot of mileage on a date for knowing how to remove a cork with
finesse! I have no idea about which is better, but I can't unscrew a
screw top any different than anyone else. smile. haha.

--
DAve

Bob Becker wrote:
> "Eric Paradisi" > wrote in message
> news:G3NKg.10004$xk3.6899@dukeread07...
>> Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
>> I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
>> get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
>> before capping them to minimize the amount of air??

>
> Agh! I just cannot get used to the idea of screw caps on a good wine.
> It really takes the romance out of it.
> Can you imagine going out to a nice dinner with someone and having
> the waiter unscrew the top of your wine? Perhaps I should print up some
> "I will give up my corker when they pry my cold dead fingers from around
> it."
> bumber stickers.
>
>
>

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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine


> wrote in message
...
> The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
> years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
> are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
> good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
> aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the
> believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in
> screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly
> harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They
> are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
> It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
> years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork
> was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with
> aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get
> new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>
>
> "Ric" > wrote in message
> m...
>> Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>> built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the world
>> in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the Aussies,
>> and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites - I'm not
>> willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age
>> similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah
>> and Cab blends.
>>
>>
>>>>
>>> Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>> embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>> wine industry.
>>>
>>> I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>> some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>> warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>> quality of the wine as well.)

>>
>>

So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???


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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Quixote wrote:
> > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
>>years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
>>are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
>>good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
>>aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the
>>believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in
>>screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly
>>harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They
>>are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
>>It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
>>years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork
>>was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with
>>aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get
>>new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>
>>
>>"Ric" > wrote in message
. com...
>>
>>>Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>>>built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the world
>>>in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the Aussies,
>>>and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites - I'm not
>>>willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age
>>>similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah
>>>and Cab blends.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>>>embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>>>wine industry.
>>>>
>>>>I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>>>some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>>>warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>>>quality of the wine as well.)
>>>
>>>

> So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???
>
>

EWWWWWWW.. you want stinky rubber on your wine? EWWWWWW
LOLOLOL
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Quote: "So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine
making???"

Last week when I visited our local wine making supplies store I saw some
cork shape corks.
They were beige in color and made of a rubberized substance. They were
prized at approx. $10.000 per bag of about 50 synthetic corks. The vendor
told me that they were an improvement over poor quality corks. I found the
price a little too high. The best thing would be to experiment with them
and ask around. What do you thing?

"gene" > wrote in message
m...
> Quixote wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>>The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
>>>years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
>>>are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
>>>good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
>>>aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the
>>>believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in
>>>screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly
>>>harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They
>>>are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
>>>It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
>>>years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork
>>>was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with
>>>aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get
>>>new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>
>>>
>>>"Ric" > wrote in message
.com...
>>>
>>>>Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>>>>built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the
>>>>world in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the
>>>>Aussies, and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites -
>>>>I'm not willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age
>>>>similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah
>>>>and Cab blends.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>>>>embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>>>>wine industry.
>>>>>
>>>>>I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>>>>some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>>>>warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>>>>quality of the wine as well.)
>>>>
>>>>

>> So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???
>>
>>

> EWWWWWWW.. you want stinky rubber on your wine? EWWWWWW
> LOLOLOL





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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

I have very mixed feelings about 'rubber' corks. Tradititional rubber
is cured with a mercaptan type sulfur compound. Won't touch that with a
ten foot pole to my wine, and they're loaded with mineral oil to make
them soft and pliable. I don't want oil extracted into my wine by the
alcohol content of the wine.
Synthetic rubber is cured with an organic peroxide compound which i'm ok
with for contact with wine, but again, they're loaded with mineral oil.
Silicone rubber is ok with wine, but expensive (the Vacuvin stoppers are
made of silicone rubber).
20 cents per cork isn't expensive... I pay 25-30 cents per real cork for
quality corks. I'd be curious what they really are made of.

Gene

wrote:
> Quote: "So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine
> making???"
>
> Last week when I visited our local wine making supplies store I saw some
> cork shape corks.
> They were beige in color and made of a rubberized substance. They were
> prized at approx. $10.000 per bag of about 50 synthetic corks. The vendor
> told me that they were an improvement over poor quality corks. I found the
> price a little too high. The best thing would be to experiment with them
> and ask around. What do you thing?
>
> "gene" > wrote in message
> m...
>
>>Quixote wrote:
>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>
>>>
>>>>The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
>>>>years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing companies
>>>>are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce. The rarity of
>>>>good quality corks have driven the major wine producing companies to use
>>>>aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are still under the
>>>>believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant to buy wine in
>>>>screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have recognized that newly
>>>>harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as good as before. They
>>>>are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an improvement.
>>>>It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of five
>>>>years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good, the cork
>>>>was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine stored with
>>>>aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My problem is to get
>>>>new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Ric" > wrote in message
y.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>>>>>built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the
>>>>>world in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the
>>>>>Aussies, and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and whites -
>>>>>I'm not willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope that they age
>>>>>similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure, but not the Syrah
>>>>>and Cab blends.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>>>>>embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>>>>>wine industry.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>>>>>some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>>>>>warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>>>>>quality of the wine as well.)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???
>>>
>>>

>>
>>EWWWWWWW.. you want stinky rubber on your wine? EWWWWWW
>>LOLOLOL

>
>
>

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Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine


Quote: "I pay 25-30 cents per real cork for quality corks. I'd be curious
what they really are made of."
What I am seeing in many supply stores are the Agglomerate corks. The
composition and binder agent are not very explicit.
Here is information extracted from: http://www.corkqc.com/cqcpro.htm#agglo

Binders
Binding agents will be prepared in compliance with USFDA regulations as
seen in Title 21 CFR 175 Subpart B [175.105].
Composition
Agglomerate corks must contain a minimum 80% natural cork as measured by
weight. Methodology for compliance is being researched
I was only able to identify the Agglomerated corks by cutting one in two
parts and lapping with a fine grit sand paper.
Then using a magnifying glass I saw what could be some cork oak particles
bound with I do not know what.
From what I gathered premium quality corks are sold to commercial wineries.
What appeared to be graded as seconds and below
is channelled I do not know where?


"gene" > wrote in message
. com...
>I have very mixed feelings about 'rubber' corks. Tradititional rubber is
>cured with a mercaptan type sulfur compound. Won't touch that with a ten
>foot pole to my wine, and they're loaded with mineral oil to make them soft
>and pliable. I don't want oil extracted into my wine by the alcohol
>content of the wine.
> Synthetic rubber is cured with an organic peroxide compound which i'm ok
> with for contact with wine, but again, they're loaded with mineral oil.
> Silicone rubber is ok with wine, but expensive (the Vacuvin stoppers are
> made of silicone rubber).
> 20 cents per cork isn't expensive... I pay 25-30 cents per real cork for
> quality corks. I'd be curious what they really are made of.
>
> Gene
>
> wrote:
>> Quote: "So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine
>> making???"
>>
>> Last week when I visited our local wine making supplies store I saw some
>> cork shape corks.
>> They were beige in color and made of a rubberized substance. They were
>> prized at approx. $10.000 per bag of about 50 synthetic corks. The
>> vendor told me that they were an improvement over poor quality corks. I
>> found the price a little too high. The best thing would be to experiment
>> with them and ask around. What do you thing?
>>
>> "gene" > wrote in message
>> m...
>>
>>>Quixote wrote:
>>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
>>>>>years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing
>>>>>companies are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce.
>>>>>The rarity of good quality corks have driven the major wine producing
>>>>>companies to use aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are
>>>>>still under the believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant
>>>>>to buy wine in screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have
>>>>>recognized that newly harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as
>>>>>good as before. They are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an
>>>>>improvement.
>>>>>It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of
>>>>>five years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good,
>>>>>the cork was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine
>>>>>stored with aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My
>>>>>problem is to get new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>"Ric" > wrote in message
gy.com...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>>>>>>built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the
>>>>>>world in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the
>>>>>>Aussies, and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and
>>>>>>whites - I'm not willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope
>>>>>>that they age similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure,
>>>>>>but not the Syrah and Cab blends.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>>>>>>embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>>>>>>wine industry.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>>>>>>some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>>>>>>warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>>>>>>quality of the wine as well.)
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>EWWWWWWW.. you want stinky rubber on your wine? EWWWWWW
>>>LOLOLOL

>>
>>


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Posts: 305
Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

Indications are that screw caps work great for commercial wine. Of course
that means you need a commercial screwcap machine to put the caps on. The
ones that have been shown to work well are ones that form the cap on the
bottle rather than just screw it down. I think they run about $20K.

Ray

"rjwhite6" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 3 Sep 2006 23:22:41 -0400, "Eric Paradisi"
> > wrote:
>
>>Do screw top bottles work as well as corked bottles for bottle aging wine.
>>I have run across some that are very reasonably priced, but don't want to
>>get them if it would be a waste. Do you fill them as much as possible
>>before capping them to minimize the amount of air??
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>--Eric
>>

> Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
> embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
> wine industry.
>
> I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
> some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
> warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
> quality of the wine as well.)



  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 208
Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

I was wondering what the 'rubbery' cork-thingies are really made of.
I get the winery quality corks... helps to work in a winery <grin>

Gene

wrote:
> Quote: "I pay 25-30 cents per real cork for quality corks. I'd be curious
> what they really are made of."
> What I am seeing in many supply stores are the Agglomerate corks. The
> composition and binder agent are not very explicit.
> Here is information extracted from:
http://www.corkqc.com/cqcpro.htm#agglo
>
> Binders
> Binding agents will be prepared in compliance with USFDA regulations as
> seen in Title 21 CFR 175 Subpart B [175.105].
> Composition
> Agglomerate corks must contain a minimum 80% natural cork as measured by
> weight. Methodology for compliance is being researched
> I was only able to identify the Agglomerated corks by cutting one in two
> parts and lapping with a fine grit sand paper.
> Then using a magnifying glass I saw what could be some cork oak particles
> bound with I do not know what.
> From what I gathered premium quality corks are sold to commercial wineries.
> What appeared to be graded as seconds and below
> is channelled I do not know where?
>
>
> "gene" > wrote in message
> . com...
>
>>I have very mixed feelings about 'rubber' corks. Tradititional rubber is
>>cured with a mercaptan type sulfur compound. Won't touch that with a ten
>>foot pole to my wine, and they're loaded with mineral oil to make them soft
>>and pliable. I don't want oil extracted into my wine by the alcohol
>>content of the wine.
>>Synthetic rubber is cured with an organic peroxide compound which i'm ok
>>with for contact with wine, but again, they're loaded with mineral oil.
>>Silicone rubber is ok with wine, but expensive (the Vacuvin stoppers are
>>made of silicone rubber).
>>20 cents per cork isn't expensive... I pay 25-30 cents per real cork for
>>quality corks. I'd be curious what they really are made of.
>>
>>Gene
>>
wrote:
>>
>>>Quote: "So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine
>>>making???"
>>>
>>>Last week when I visited our local wine making supplies store I saw some
>>>cork shape corks.
>>>They were beige in color and made of a rubberized substance. They were
>>>prized at approx. $10.000 per bag of about 50 synthetic corks. The
>>>vendor told me that they were an improvement over poor quality corks. I
>>>found the price a little too high. The best thing would be to experiment
>>>with them and ask around. What do you thing?
>>>
>>>"gene" > wrote in message
.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Quixote wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>The bark of the oak trees have been harvest in Portugal for hundred of
>>>>>>years. At first the quality was good now renown wine producing
>>>>>>companies are reluctant to use corks. Now the competition is fierce.
>>>>>>The rarity of good quality corks have driven the major wine producing
>>>>>>companies to use aluminums screw caps. Older French wine drinkers are
>>>>>>still under the believe that corks is the best thing and are reluctant
>>>>>>to buy wine in screw cap bottles. The wine connoisseurs have
>>>>>>recognized that newly harvested corks from the old oak trees are not as
>>>>>>good as before. They are accepted the aluminums screw caps as an
>>>>>>improvement.
>>>>>>It is a shocker most of my bottles are for corks. Over a period of
>>>>>>five years I have learned that when my wine was not tasting as good,
>>>>>>the cork was found to be defective. Conversely, none of the wine
>>>>>>stored with aluminums screw cap was found to be of poor taste. My
>>>>>>problem is to get new aluminums screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"Ric" > wrote in message
igy.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Personally, I think that the jury is still out on how well red wines
>>>>>>>built for aging will do under screw caps. While New Zealand led the
>>>>>>>world in promoting top quality white wines under screw caps, and the
>>>>>>>Aussies, and some Californians, are doing so with both reds and
>>>>>>>whites - I'm not willing tp put a big red under screw caps and hope
>>>>>>>that they age similarly to under a cork. Young drinking Zins, sure,
>>>>>>>but not the Syrah and Cab blends.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Screw cap bottles work just fine. The Australian wine industry has
>>>>>>>>embraced them and they are becoming more popular in the California
>>>>>>>>wine industry.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>I still use the head space recommended for corked bottles. You need
>>>>>>>>some head space so that the bottles don't burst if they get much
>>>>>>>>warmer than when they were bottled. (But that would be bad for the
>>>>>>>>quality of the wine as well.)
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>So where does this discussion leave rubber corks for home wine making???
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>EWWWWWWW.. you want stinky rubber on your wine? EWWWWWW
>>>>LOLOLOL
>>>
>>>

>

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jim jim is offline
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Posts: 276
Default Screw Capped bottles for Wine

It may be a stupid question, I'm very new to this... Aren't commercial wines bulk aged for a while in wooden barrels or
huge metal vats before being bottled? If so, might wine made at home then bottled for cellaring with a screw cap before
drinking , age a little differently?

> wrote in message ...
> All is needed is a tool and die designer to create the tool and China to fabricate it. I am curious to find what's at
> the patent office already?
>
> "gene" > wrote in message t...
>> Do you think we'll be able to afford one of those tool-and-die-maker models? <grin>
>> Gene
>>
>> wrote:
>>> Here they only screw caps available are made of plastic. I have talk to the representative of a major plastic caps
>>> manufacturing company. He stated that the bulk of their business is for the soft drink industries. I am not too
>>> comfortable with these ordinary plastic caps. As you have stated the aluminums caps are rolled and crimped on the
>>> bottle. Correct me if I am wrong but the principle is the same as making light bulk base socket. May be some
>>> retired tools maker will come on will a modified aluminums gimping/rolling die for home bottling use?
>>>
>>> "Joe Sallustio" > wrote in message
>>> ups.com...
>>>
>>>>... My problem is to get new aluminums
>>>>
>>>>>screw caps and suitable bottles.
>>>>
>>>>Marie,
>>>>That is just not going to happen, the aluminum screw caps are machine
>>>>applied and crimped right on the bottle. That's why it's such a good
>>>>seal. I'm not aware of a homewinemaking screw-cap machine.
>>>>
>>>>That said, there are two versions of screw caps for winebottles
>>>>available. One has a normal looking liner, the other has a poly
>>>>'dimple' that goes into the bottle forming a higher quality seal from
>>>>what I have been told. The cost difference is very small, you may want
>>>>to look for those. I use them on vinegar.
>>>>
>>>>Joe
>>>>
>>>
>>>

>



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