Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
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Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Does not compute:

http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

--Blair
"For every rule there is an exceptional tea."
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Blair P. Houghton > writes:

> Does not compute:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy


When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Blair P. Houghton > writes:

> Does not compute:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy


When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
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Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Lewis Perin > wrote:
>Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>
>> Does not compute:
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>
>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.


I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
aging.

--Blair
"Good thing we no step in it."
-Cheech y Chong
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Lewis Perin > wrote:
>Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>
>> Does not compute:
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>
>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.


I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
aging.

--Blair
"Good thing we no step in it."
-Cheech y Chong


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Derek
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Blair P. Houghton rose and spake the following:

> Lewis Perin > wrote:
>>Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>>
>>> Does not compute:
>>>
>>> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>>
>>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

>
> I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
> for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
> other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
> piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
> be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
> aging.


Doubtful. I have "loose" pu-erh in my cabinet. It's aged.

--
Derek

Until you spread your wings, you'll have no idea how far you can walk.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Derek
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

Blair P. Houghton rose and spake the following:

> Lewis Perin > wrote:
>>Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>>
>>> Does not compute:
>>>
>>> http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>>
>>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

>
> I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
> for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
> other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
> piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
> be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
> aging.


Doubtful. I have "loose" pu-erh in my cabinet. It's aged.

--
Derek

Until you spread your wings, you'll have no idea how far you can walk.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
fLameDogg
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

On Sun, 30 May 2004 21:40:23 -0500, Derek wrote:

> Blair P. Houghton rose and spake the following:
>
>> Lewis Perin > wrote:

<snip>
>>>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>>>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>>>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>>>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>>>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>>>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>>>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

>>
>> I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
>> for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
>> other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
>> piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
>> be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
>> aging.

>
> Doubtful. I have "loose" pu-erh in my cabinet. It's aged.


It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
and shape them, and the whittlings would be...

Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....

Don't you just love it when people who have no idea make wild-eyed
guesses? ;O)
--
fD

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
fLameDogg
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

On Sun, 30 May 2004 21:40:23 -0500, Derek wrote:

> Blair P. Houghton rose and spake the following:
>
>> Lewis Perin > wrote:

<snip>
>>>When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
>>>authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
>>>etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
>>>reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
>>>Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
>>>compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
>>>safe to say that Puerh is confusing.

>>
>> I think you clued me. Caked pu-erh is stacked in caves
>> for years or decades, where it can ferment and undergo
>> other transformations. I bet if you just leave it in
>> piles it composts inside. So the loose-leaf pu-erh might
>> be the "fresh" product, without any of the effects of
>> aging.

>
> Doubtful. I have "loose" pu-erh in my cabinet. It's aged.


It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
and shape them, and the whittlings would be...

Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....

Don't you just love it when people who have no idea make wild-eyed
guesses? ;O)
--
fD

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
fLameDogg
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 at 20:47 GMT,
Dog Ma 1 > wrote:

> wrote:
>> It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
>> that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
>> just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
>> little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
>> and shape them, and the whittlings would be...
>>
>> Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....

>
> Clever idea, if not very practical. But the orientation of both surface and
> bulk leaves in the tuochas I've examined makes clear that they were pressed
> into final form. Ditto round bingchas. Interestingly, some of the (few)
> fangchas I've seen seem pressed, some cut from a longer strip.


Honestly, I've not observed enough pu-erh to have formed much of an
opinion, but if pressed I would have guessed that they are pressed.

So (now) I'm guessing the touchas are the little mushrooms, with
bingchas being round cakes? Fangchas I can't envision, although since
you say "cut from a longer strip" they must be strips. Or...

Wait, why am I hounding you? Google is my friend!

Hmmm...

I must admit to an affliction: I am almost uttery monolingual. I sense
danger. That is, I have a feeling that there are linguistic subtleties
here beyond "foo == round" or "baz == square" that I don't grasp. But
it does look like "tuochas" can be little bowls.

This page looks interesting:

http://www.no-occident.com/nopuerh.htm

"Tuancha, varies in size from approximately golf ball size to much
larger. At one time when balls of tea were used as tribute tea, they
would be in the size of a human head. Appropriately called 'Head Tea'."

Yow!

--
fD
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
fLameDogg
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 at 20:47 GMT,
Dog Ma 1 > wrote:

> wrote:
>> It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
>> that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
>> just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
>> little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
>> and shape them, and the whittlings would be...
>>
>> Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....

>
> Clever idea, if not very practical. But the orientation of both surface and
> bulk leaves in the tuochas I've examined makes clear that they were pressed
> into final form. Ditto round bingchas. Interestingly, some of the (few)
> fangchas I've seen seem pressed, some cut from a longer strip.


Honestly, I've not observed enough pu-erh to have formed much of an
opinion, but if pressed I would have guessed that they are pressed.

So (now) I'm guessing the touchas are the little mushrooms, with
bingchas being round cakes? Fangchas I can't envision, although since
you say "cut from a longer strip" they must be strips. Or...

Wait, why am I hounding you? Google is my friend!

Hmmm...

I must admit to an affliction: I am almost uttery monolingual. I sense
danger. That is, I have a feeling that there are linguistic subtleties
here beyond "foo == round" or "baz == square" that I don't grasp. But
it does look like "tuochas" can be little bowls.

This page looks interesting:

http://www.no-occident.com/nopuerh.htm

"Tuancha, varies in size from approximately golf ball size to much
larger. At one time when balls of tea were used as tribute tea, they
would be in the size of a human head. Appropriately called 'Head Tea'."

Yow!

--
fD
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg > wrote:
>It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
>that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
>just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
>little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
>and shape them, and the whittlings would be...
>
>Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....
>
>Don't you just love it when people who have no idea make wild-eyed
>guesses? ;O)


So is "pu-erh": a variety of bush; a district; a method
of crushing and baking; the method of making cakes; a brand
name; or something else?

I was surfing the net and found a webpage discussing the
serious portion of the early history of tea (not that
silliness about boiling water for blah when the wind blew
leaves into a pot), which indicated that in China tea was
pressed into cakes and "used as currency". Makes sense.
Tea of average quality would be fungible. Naturally,
not all tea is of average quality, but Gresham's law keeps
your economy on an average-quality basis.

--Blair
"Not to go off-topic or nothing."
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg > wrote:
>It might just have to do with how it's aged, and how it's arranged during
>that process; but I suspect there's a bit more to making pu-erh cakes than
>just letting it compost together. Some of that stuff is shaped like
>little mushrooms. Hmm. But I guess they could take bricks of the stuff
>and shape them, and the whittlings would be...
>
>Loose, aged pu-erh! Could it be? Is this the secret?....
>
>Don't you just love it when people who have no idea make wild-eyed
>guesses? ;O)


So is "pu-erh": a variety of bush; a district; a method
of crushing and baking; the method of making cakes; a brand
name; or something else?

I was surfing the net and found a webpage discussing the
serious portion of the early history of tea (not that
silliness about boiling water for blah when the wind blew
leaves into a pot), which indicated that in China tea was
pressed into cakes and "used as currency". Makes sense.
Tea of average quality would be fungible. Naturally,
not all tea is of average quality, but Gresham's law keeps
your economy on an average-quality basis.

--Blair
"Not to go off-topic or nothing."


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg > wrote:
>This page looks interesting:


That, sir, is an understatement.

>http://www.no-occident.com/nopuerh.htm


Awesome link. Great find.

Pu-Erh is a town. Excellent info. So anything might come
from there, from compressed tea to special implements to
interesting methods.

>"Tuancha, varies in size from approximately golf ball size to much
>larger. At one time when balls of tea were used as tribute tea, they
>would be in the size of a human head. Appropriately called 'Head Tea'."


I like this one.

"This tea was originally used as "bricks" for trade
with bordering countries. Tea was used as money. The
compressed tea was easy to transport, lasted forever, and
was convenient to make tea from by shaving off a portion
to add to the water."

Which means only one thing:

Money does grow on trees.

--Blair
"It's justice that you can't
find in the Bushes."
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Blair P. Houghton
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg > wrote:
>This page looks interesting:


That, sir, is an understatement.

>http://www.no-occident.com/nopuerh.htm


Awesome link. Great find.

Pu-Erh is a town. Excellent info. So anything might come
from there, from compressed tea to special implements to
interesting methods.

>"Tuancha, varies in size from approximately golf ball size to much
>larger. At one time when balls of tea were used as tribute tea, they
>would be in the size of a human head. Appropriately called 'Head Tea'."


I like this one.

"This tea was originally used as "bricks" for trade
with bordering countries. Tea was used as money. The
compressed tea was easy to transport, lasted forever, and
was convenient to make tea from by shaving off a portion
to add to the water."

Which means only one thing:

Money does grow on trees.

--Blair
"It's justice that you can't
find in the Bushes."
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dog Ma 1
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg wrote:
> So (now) I'm guessing the touchas are the little mushrooms, with
> bingchas being round cakes? Fangchas I can't envision, although since
> you say "cut from a longer strip" they must be strips. Or...
>
> Wait, why am I hounding you? Google is my friend!


May I also recommend: http://www.pu-erh.net/ .

-DM


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dog Ma 1
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

fLameDogg wrote:
> So (now) I'm guessing the touchas are the little mushrooms, with
> bingchas being round cakes? Fangchas I can't envision, although since
> you say "cut from a longer strip" they must be strips. Or...
>
> Wait, why am I hounding you? Google is my friend!


May I also recommend: http://www.pu-erh.net/ .

-DM


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Tealover
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

You can also found Tea Bricks of Pu-Erh specially made for ONE cup !


"Pu Erh Tea Brick
Compressed into a tea brick for a single cup, this Pu-Er keeps its flavour
full and genuine. "
at
http://www.betjemanandbarton.com/en/shop/prd.php?id=133

---

"Lewis Perin" > a écrit dans le message de
news
> Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>
> > Does not compute:
> >
> > http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>
> When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
> authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
> etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
> reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
> Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
> compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
> safe to say that Puerh is confusing.
>
> /Lew
> ---
> Lew Perin /
>
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Tealover
 
Posts: n/a
Default "Loose-leaf" Pu-erh??

You can also found Tea Bricks of Pu-Erh specially made for ONE cup !


"Pu Erh Tea Brick
Compressed into a tea brick for a single cup, this Pu-Er keeps its flavour
full and genuine. "
at
http://www.betjemanandbarton.com/en/shop/prd.php?id=133

---

"Lewis Perin" > a écrit dans le message de
news
> Blair P. Houghton > writes:
>
> > Does not compute:
> >
> > http://tinyurl.com/2ympy

>
> When you say "does not compute", I assume you're referring to the
> authorities who tell you all Puerh is made compressed (cake, brick,
> etc.) But they're apparently wrong. I've had loose Puerhs from a few
> reputable vendors. I have to say, though, that none of the loose
> Puerhs I've tried has been as good as what seem to me comparable
> compressed ones. Is this a trend? I can't say. In any case, it's
> safe to say that Puerh is confusing.
>
> /Lew
> ---
> Lew Perin /
>
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html


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