Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 18-09-2008, 09:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default rec: Honey Cakes (cookies)

Here's another recipe from the same article on Christmases in days
of yore. The spicing, as well as the inclusion of rye flour, is
interesting to me. They sound somewhat akin to pfeffernuisse, but
different. This one dates to 1743.

Crossposting again. Beware.

Honey Cakes
Source: American Cookery, December 1919, page 347
Formatted etc. by Jean B.

1 tsp cloves
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp anise [seed as vs. ground?]
1/2 tsp ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 1/2 c rye flour
1 1/2 c wheat flour
1 3/4 c honey
1 c sugar

Sift together the spices, salt, and flours. Put honey and sugar
in a pot and let boil up, then pour it on the flour mixture and
stir until a stiff dough is formed. If necessary, add more honey
or flour until stiff enough to roll. Roll into small balls and
bake in a moderate oven. When cool, dip each ball in a thin white
frosting.

--
Jean B.

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Old 18-09-2008, 10:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Angel Food Cookies


"
Amish Angel Food Cookies
1 cup Crisco
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 cup coconut

Mix Crisco and sugar until creamy; add egg.

Sift all dry ingredients together. Add to Crisco mixture. Roll dough into
small balls and dip into water, then into brown sugar. Put on cookie sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees F for 15 minutes.

Makes 4 dozen.

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Old 18-09-2008, 10:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Apple Fritters

Amish Apple Fritters
8 medium firm cooking apples
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, separated
Grated rind of 1 lemon
1/2 cup milk
Confectioners sugar

Peel and slice the apples into 1/4-inch slices.

Combine the brown sugar and lemon juice in a 10-inch shallow dish. Add the
apple slices, spooning the sauce over both sides of the fruit. Allow to
stand for 1 hour, turning occasionally.

Heat 3 inches of oil in a heavy skillet.

Combine the flour, sugar, cinnamon and salt.

In another bowl beat the egg yolks thoroughly and add the rind and milk.
Combine with the dry ingredients.

In a mixing bowl beat the egg whites until stiff, then gently fold them into
the batter. The batter will be puffy and there will be some white patches
showing. Dip the apple slices into the batter, firmly pushing the slices
into the batter until both sides are covered.

With tongs, drop the apple into the hot oil and cook until golden on one
side - about 2 minutes. Turn and fry on the other side for 1 minute.
Sprinkle with confectioners sugar.

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Old 18-09-2008, 10:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Angel Food Cookies

Dimitri wrote:

"
Amish Angel Food Cookies
1 cup Crisco
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 cup coconut

Mix Crisco and sugar until creamy; add egg.

Sift all dry ingredients together. Add to Crisco mixture. Roll dough
into small balls and dip into water, then into brown sugar. Put on
cookie sheet. Bake at 375 degrees F for 15 minutes.

Makes 4 dozen.


Question: is the coconut considered one of the dry ingredients? If so,
how does one sift it together with the other dry ingredients?

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
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Old 18-09-2008, 10:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Apple Fritters


"Dimitri" wrote
With tongs, drop the apple into the hot oil and cook until golden on one
side - about 2 minutes. Turn and fry on the other side for 1 minute.
Sprinkle with confectioners sugar.

Mmm, I love these.




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Old 19-09-2008, 02:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Angel Food Cookies

Dimitri wrote:

"
Amish Angel Food Cookies
1 cup Crisco
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 cup coconut

Mix Crisco and sugar until creamy; add egg.

Sift all dry ingredients together. Add to Crisco mixture. Roll dough
into small balls and dip into water, then into brown sugar. Put on
cookie sheet. Bake at 375 degrees F for 15 minutes.

Makes 4 dozen.


Thanks for the recipe. I am guessing this is sweetened coconut. Yum, I
love coconut.

Since Brian is not complaining about Crisco, that takes some of the
sport out of it. ;-)

Becca

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Old 20-09-2008, 02:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Angel Food Cookies

In article ,
"Dimitri" wrote:

Amish Angel Food Cookies


What is it that makes these Amish cookies, D? I first made them 42
years ago after getting the recipe from the lady in the downstairs
apartment where we lived after getting married?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
on "A Prairie Home Companion," http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
programs/2008/08/30/
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Old 20-09-2008, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Default Amish Angel Food Cookies


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Dimitri" wrote:

Amish Angel Food Cookies


What is it that makes these Amish cookies, D? I first made them 42
years ago after getting the recipe from the lady in the downstairs
apartment where we lived after getting married?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
on "A Prairie Home Companion," http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
programs/2008/08/30/


Why there in an Amish cookbook don't you know.

LOL

Dimitri

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Old 20-09-2008, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.historic
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Posts: 12,124
Default Amish Angel Food Cookies

In article ,
"Dimitri" wrote:

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Dimitri" wrote:

Amish Angel Food Cookies


What is it that makes these Amish cookies, D? I first made them 42
years ago after getting the recipe from the lady in the downstairs
apartment where we lived after getting married?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ


Why there in an Amish cookbook don't you know.

LOL

Dimitri



Got it! g
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller,
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor, read it and weep
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Old 31-12-2008, 05:02 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 33
Default

Those honey cakes sound absolutely delicious. Sorry I didn't see this post before the holidays but I did just run out of cookies...these would be perfect with a hot cup of Kona coffee. Hawaiian coffee has a rich history and has been grown, harvested and roasted in the same way for generations of small farmers. I get pure Kona coffee from https://konaluna.com and their website also tells the story of Hawaiian coffee.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean B.[_1_] View Post
Here's another recipe from the same article on Christmases in days
of yore. The spicing, as well as the inclusion of rye flour, is
interesting to me. They sound somewhat akin to pfeffernuisse, but
different. This one dates to 1743.

Crossposting again. Beware.

Honey Cakes
Source: American Cookery, December 1919, page 347
Formatted etc. by Jean B.

1 tsp cloves
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp anise [seed as vs. ground?]
1/2 tsp ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 1/2 c rye flour
1 1/2 c wheat flour
1 3/4 c honey
1 c sugar

Sift together the spices, salt, and flours. Put honey and sugar
in a pot and let boil up, then pour it on the flour mixture and
stir until a stiff dough is formed. If necessary, add more honey
or flour until stiff enough to roll. Roll into small balls and
bake in a moderate oven. When cool, dip each ball in a thin white
frosting.

--
Jean B.


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