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Default TV Chefs and Real Chefs

Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one
in TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on
TV or not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah

Fictional

1. Adam from Northern Exposure
2. Adam Sandlers character in Spaglish

Real

1. Justin Wilson (RIP) little wine for dis and little more for me!
2. Graham Kerr. The Galloping Gourmet. mainly because i used to watch it
with my mother as a child and though it was quite interesting.
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"Grizzman" > wrote in message
...
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one in
> TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on TV or
> not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah
>
> Fictional
>
> 1. Adam from Northern Exposure
> 2. Adam Sandlers character in Spaglish
>
> Real
>
> 1. Justin Wilson (RIP) little wine for dis and little more for me!
> 2. Graham Kerr. The Galloping Gourmet. mainly because i used to watch it
> with my mother as a child and though it was quite interesting.




Real or Fictional, you call it
Anthony Bourdain, for his love of adventure, food and DRINK! and those
skinny, girl-y arms and legs.
Dee Dee


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"Grizzman" > wrote in message
...
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one in
> TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on TV or
> not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah
>
> Fictional
>
> 1. Adam from Northern Exposure
> 2. Adam Sandlers character in Spaglish
>
> Real
>
> 1. Justin Wilson (RIP) little wine for dis and little more for me!
> 2. Graham Kerr. The Galloping Gourmet. mainly because i used to watch it
> with my mother as a child and though it was quite interesting.


TV chefs: Emeril. It's stylish to dump on him, but the fact is, he cooks
like a real person, using ingredients we can actually get.

In real life: Me. I'm amazing.


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This is a bit off-topic, but I love when Rachael Ray goes into
different kitchens on "$40 a Day." They show how chefs throw together
the dishes, and it's constantly astonishing. The best part is, they
don't bore us with "helpful" hints about nutmeg or meaningless stories
about their Grandpa Emanuel.

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"Grizzman" > wrote in message
...
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one in
> TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on TV or
> not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah
>
> Fictional
> I
> 1. Adam from Northern Exposure
> 2. Adam Sandlers character in Spaglish
>
> Real
>
> 1. Justin Wilson (RIP) little wine for dis and little more for me!
> 2. Graham Kerr. The Galloping Gourmet. mainly because i used to watch it
> with my mother as a child and though it was quite interesting.


I'll play...

Fictional. The two brothers from the movie "The Big Night" Man, the food
they trucked out!
Honorable mention to June Cleaver (leave it to Beaver) who always cooked
wearing pearls, ear rings, a dress with stockings and HH shoes.

Real.
Julia Julia Julia. (I don't even have to say her last name and you know who
I'm talking about)
Paul Prudhomme. Kinda out of the picture these days, but a great talent.
Alton Brown. Just because he knows everything (or seems to)
Local chef like. Tim Love, owner chef of Lonesome Dove Rest in Fort Worth.
He's been featured on the Food channel from time to time.

Larry T








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Dee Randall wrote:


> Real or Fictional, you call it
> Anthony Bourdain, for his love of adventure, food and DRINK! and
> those skinny, girl-y arms and legs. Dee Dee


And there's the fictional character based on him, Jack Bourdain of the
now departed Kitchen Confidential TV show (unaired episodes available
at fine bitorrents near you).




Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> In real life: Me. I'm amazing.


That's funny. Me is my favorite chef, too. And I thought nobody else
knew about him!

--Blair
"Now I'm gonna have to find a new place..."

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"Blair P. Houghton" > wrote in message
ps.com...
>
> JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
>> In real life: Me. I'm amazing.

>
> That's funny. Me is my favorite chef, too. And I thought nobody else
> knew about him!
>
> --Blair
> "Now I'm gonna have to find a new place..."
>


Nobody can make more sauces out of bourbon than I can. They always turn out
well, but I can't remember a single one of them. Show me a TV chef who can
do this! :-)


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Grizzman > wrote:
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one
> in TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on


> Fictional


Chef, from the British TV show "Chef!"
I forget the character's name, he was played by Lenny Henry.

> Real


There was a chef working in a local restaurant about 8 or 9
years ago. He was amazing, and probably still in his 20s.
I told him he should be in a big city somewhere, and I hope
he made it big. The restaurant has changed ownership and names
at least 4 times since then.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
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Default User wrote:

> Dee Randall wrote:
>


>>Real or Fictional, you call it
>>Anthony Bourdain, for his love of adventure, food and DRINK! and
>>those skinny, girl-y arms and legs. Dee Dee

>
>
> And there's the fictional character based on him, Jack Bourdain of the
> now departed Kitchen Confidential TV show (unaired episodes available
> at fine bitorrents near you).


Thanks for the tip, Brian. I'll be looking for it.

I'm wondering how I missed it. Must of went by(e) fast.

--
Reg



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Grizzman wrote:
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one
> in TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on
> TV or not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah
>
> Fictional
>
> 1. Adam from Northern Exposure
> 2. Adam Sandlers character in Spaglish
>
> Real
>
> 1. Justin Wilson (RIP) little wine for dis and little more for me!
> 2. Graham Kerr. The Galloping Gourmet. mainly because i used to watch it
> with my mother as a child and though it was quite interesting.


My TV favorites a

Julia Child, rest in peace great lady
Alton Brown, bringing science to America one food at a time

Fictional:
Lenny Henry's character from "Chef!"
The unnamed, unseen chef from Star Trek: Enterprise
Hop Sing from the old "Bonanza" show...anyone that could keep Hoss feed
had to be a damn good cook!

Fictional TV chef:
Elzar from Futurama
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Fictional:
"Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support, and
she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
important.

TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who isn't
afraid to eat damn near anything.

Real and close to Home: FBS, trained in technical school and then by Uncle
Sam in the good ol' USN. He can cook anything........filet mignon to
seagull.

-ginny



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Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
> Fictional:
> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support, and
> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
> important.
>
> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who isn't
> afraid to eat damn near anything.


Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana tamales
he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how bad
something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
puts in her mouth.

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> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
>> Fictional:
>> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support, and
>> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
>> important.
>>
>> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who
>> isn't
>> afraid to eat damn near anything.

>
> Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana tamales
> he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
> he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how bad
> something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
> believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
> because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
> puts in her mouth.


I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant "French
Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best restaurant in
the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was when he
ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had a long
face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.
Dee Dee


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Dee Randall wrote:
> > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> >
> > Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
> >> Fictional:
> >> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support, and
> >> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
> >> important.
> >>
> >> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who
> >> isn't
> >> afraid to eat damn near anything.

> >
> > Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana tamales
> > he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
> > he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how bad
> > something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
> > believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
> > because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
> > puts in her mouth.

>
> I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant "French
> Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best restaurant in
> the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was when he
> ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had a long
> face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
> kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.


That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!



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> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Dee Randall wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> >
>> > Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
>> >> Fictional:
>> >> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support,
>> >> and
>> >> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
>> >> important.
>> >>
>> >> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who
>> >> isn't
>> >> afraid to eat damn near anything.
>> >
>> > Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana tamales
>> > he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
>> > he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how bad
>> > something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
>> > believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
>> > because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
>> > puts in her mouth.

>>
>> I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant
>> "French
>> Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best restaurant
>> in
>> the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was when
>> he
>> ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had a
>> long
>> face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
>> kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.

>
> That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
> in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
> Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
> doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
> dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
> to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
>

I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
"Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
"Bone in the Throat"
"Gone Bamboo"
"Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"

Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?

Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
probably other things?) takes on him.
Dee Dee


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In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:

> > wrote in message
> oups.com...


> > That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
> > in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
> > Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
> > doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
> > dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
> > to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
> >

> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
> "Bone in the Throat"
> "Gone Bamboo"
> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>
> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?
>
> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
> probably other things?) takes on him.
> Dee Dee


_A Cooks Tour_
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/158...6651?v=glance&
n=283155

marcella
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"Dee Randall" > wrote

> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
> probably other things?) takes on him.


I believe he's a recovering (?) heroin addict. I think he's
really likeable and pretty damm funny. Did you see him in
Japan with the vending machines, so funny.

nancy


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Dee Randall wrote:

> >

> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
> "Bone in the Throat"
> "Gone Bamboo"
> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>
> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?


That book was "A Cook's Tour". He's a great writer as well as a chef.
Kitchen Confidential should be on all RC'ers reading list if you
haven't read it already. "Bone in the Throat" and "Gone Bamboo" are
purely fiction, but they are funny, well written, and both revolve
around the life of a chef. His Les Halles Cookbook is also remarkable,
but not one I'd advise you to share with Grandma if she's offended by
strong language.

Sandy

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Grizzman wrote:
> Who are you favorite TV chefs and real Chefs, Fictional Chefs, the one
> in TV shows and movies. Real chefs speak for themselves, they can be on
> TV or not. and no Oprah doesn't count! bwhahahahah


Real chefs: Julia Child, Anthony Bourdain, both of my Grandmothers

My favorite of all: The Swedish Chef! Bork! Bork! Bork!

Sandy



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orgasmic reaction to everything she
> puts in her mouth.


Now that would make her a pretty good date! Great mental image conjured
up... he he

Larry T



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Dee Randall wrote:
> > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > Dee Randall wrote:
> >> > wrote in message
> >> ups.com...
> >> >
> >> > Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
> >> >> Fictional:
> >> >> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government support,
> >> >> and
> >> >> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what was
> >> >> important.
> >> >>
> >> >> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook who
> >> >> isn't
> >> >> afraid to eat damn near anything.
> >> >
> >> > Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana tamales
> >> > he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
> >> > he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how bad
> >> > something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
> >> > believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
> >> > because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
> >> > puts in her mouth.
> >>
> >> I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant
> >> "French
> >> Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best restaurant
> >> in
> >> the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was when
> >> he
> >> ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had a
> >> long
> >> face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
> >> kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.

> >
> > That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
> > in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
> > Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
> > doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
> > dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
> > to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
> >

> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
> "Bone in the Throat"
> "Gone Bamboo"
> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>
> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?
>
> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
> probably other things?) takes on him.


It's in his book A Cook's Tour, in a chapter called "West Coast." It's
one of the most entertaining chapters in the book. He gives a bunch of
CA. vegetarians the chance to convert him to vegetarianism ("Not one of
them could cook a ****ing vegetable," he concludes), then goes to SF,
where he makes note of all the prostitution, junkies, and homelessness,
and finds it strange that in such an environment he has trouble finding
a spot where he can smoke some tobacco. Finally he ends up with a
positive note, his dinner at the French Laundry.

Yeah, smoking's a lousy habit and it has taken a toll on Bourdain. Did
you see the Chinese episode of "No Reservations"? He tries bicycle
riding but doesn't make it too far.

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Nancy Young wrote:
> "Dee Randall" > wrote
>
> > Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
> > probably other things?) takes on him.

>
> I believe he's a recovering (?) heroin addict. I think he's
> really likeable and pretty damm funny. Did you see him in
> Japan with the vending machines, so funny.


Yep, he quit heroin in the 80s. I like his sense of humor a lot too.
There are episodes of Cook's Tour and No Reservations devoted to Tony
Bourdain in Japan, and they were lots of fun.

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"Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com...

>
>> > That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
>> > in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
>> > Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
>> > doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
>> > dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
>> > to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
>> >

>> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
>> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
>> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
>> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
>> "Bone in the Throat"
>> "Gone Bamboo"
>> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>>
>> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?
>>
>> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
>> probably other things?) takes on him.
>> Dee Dee

>
> _A Cooks Tour_
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/158...6651?v=glance&
> n=283155
>
> marcella


Thanks, Marcella. Wow, he has a lot of books that I didn't know about.
I'm in for a treat.
Dee Dee


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"Nancy Young" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dee Randall" > wrote
>
>> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
>> probably other things?) takes on him.

>
> I believe he's a recovering (?) heroin addict. I think he's
> really likeable and pretty damm funny. Did you see him in
> Japan with the vending machines, so funny.
>
> nancy


I haven't seen that yet (as far as my fading memory serves me - short term
memory loss). I have the Asian (and Japan) recorded and all I can get. We
watch one when we can. DH and I both enjoy the shows.
He's certainly more entertaining than most of the travel/food shows --
maybe too over-the-top for some, tho.

I figured he had or had/had a problem with drugs. Too darned skinny.
Dee Dee





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> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Dee Randall wrote:
>
>> >

>> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
>> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
>> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
>> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
>> "Bone in the Throat"
>> "Gone Bamboo"
>> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>>
>> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?

>
> That book was "A Cook's Tour". He's a great writer as well as a chef.
> Kitchen Confidential should be on all RC'ers reading list if you
> haven't read it already. "Bone in the Throat" and "Gone Bamboo" are
> purely fiction, but they are funny, well written, and both revolve
> around the life of a chef. His Les Halles Cookbook is also remarkable,
> but not one I'd advise you to share with Grandma if she's offended by
> strong language.
>
> Sandy


I used to like Paul Theroux many years ago, but he got too tame for me. But
a good read at the time. I especially liked his trek around Britain during
the 80's, and the diminishing of the rails.

I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French Laundry
Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!

Thanks for the tip, I'll put the "Kitchen Confidential" on my list right
now.

PS, I'm wondering if others of his books are called "A Cook's Tour" because
my "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" says in the largest letters "A
COOK'S TOUR." I'll have to check them out.
Dee Dee
Dee Dee


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> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Dee Randall wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> >
>> > Dee Randall wrote:
>> >> > wrote in message
>> >> ups.com...
>> >> >
>> >> > Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
>> >> >> Fictional:
>> >> >> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government
>> >> >> support,
>> >> >> and
>> >> >> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what
>> >> >> was
>> >> >> important.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook
>> >> >> who
>> >> >> isn't
>> >> >> afraid to eat damn near anything.
>> >> >
>> >> > Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana
>> >> > tamales
>> >> > he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
>> >> > he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how
>> >> > bad
>> >> > something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
>> >> > believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
>> >> > because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
>> >> > puts in her mouth.
>> >>
>> >> I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant
>> >> "French
>> >> Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best
>> >> restaurant
>> >> in
>> >> the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was
>> >> when
>> >> he
>> >> ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had
>> >> a
>> >> long
>> >> face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
>> >> kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.
>> >
>> > That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
>> > in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
>> > Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
>> > doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
>> > dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
>> > to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
>> >

>> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
>> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
>> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
>> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
>> "Bone in the Throat"
>> "Gone Bamboo"
>> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
>>
>> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?
>>
>> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
>> probably other things?) takes on him.

>
> It's in his book A Cook's Tour, in a chapter called "West Coast." It's
> one of the most entertaining chapters in the book. He gives a bunch of
> CA. vegetarians the chance to convert him to vegetarianism ("Not one of
> them could cook a ****ing vegetable," he concludes), then goes to SF,
> where he makes note of all the prostitution, junkies, and homelessness,
> and finds it strange that in such an environment he has trouble finding
> a spot where he can smoke some tobacco. Finally he ends up with a
> positive note, his dinner at the French Laundry.
>
> Yeah, smoking's a lousy habit and it has taken a toll on Bourdain. Did
> you see the Chinese episode of "No Reservations"? He tries bicycle
> riding but doesn't make it too far.


Hmm, The book I have is also entitled "A Cook's Tour" in large letters, but
in smaller letters, "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines." I'm wondering
if these are a series of books of "A Cook's Tour" with each one of them
being under a different category/title.

I've got the Chinese episode recorded from a few weeks ago. I'm looking
forward to seeing it. I'm also recording all the old Global Trekker (or
Globe Trekker) reruns of the 80's, I believe. I'm enjoying them more today
than I did when they first came out. Not enough food in them, but
sometimes.
Dee Dee


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Dee Randall wrote:
> > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> >
> > Dee Randall wrote:
> >> > wrote in message
> >> oups.com...
> >> >
> >> > Dee Randall wrote:
> >> >> > wrote in message
> >> >> ups.com...
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
> >> >> >> Fictional:
> >> >> >> "Mama" in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. No money, no government
> >> >> >> support,
> >> >> >> and
> >> >> >> she made sure her kids were fed. My kind of woman, she knew what
> >> >> >> was
> >> >> >> important.
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> TV/Real(?): Tony Bourdain, hands down. The man is a trained cook
> >> >> >> who
> >> >> >> isn't
> >> >> >> afraid to eat damn near anything.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Plus, when something Bourdain eats tastes foul (like the Iguana
> >> >> > tamales
> >> >> > he eat in Mexico on the old Cook's Tour show), he says so. In fact,
> >> >> > he's arguably at his most entertaining when he's ranting about how
> >> >> > bad
> >> >> > something is. And when Bourdain says something's great, it's
> >> >> > believable. Someone like Rachel Ray is useless as a source of info
> >> >> > because she has the same feigned orgasmic reaction to everything she
> >> >> > puts in her mouth.
> >> >>
> >> >> I can't remember which program it was, but he went to the restaurant
> >> >> "French
> >> >> Laundry" (I believe it was - it's considered by many the best
> >> >> restaurant
> >> >> in
> >> >> the U.S.) and was tasting each dish and commenting. My favorite was
> >> >> when
> >> >> he
> >> >> ordered the lowly "french fry" to see how it compared. He really had
> >> >> a
> >> >> long
> >> >> face when he had to admit how good they were. Bet he was back in the
> >> >> kitchen pronto asking chef how they were made.
> >> >
> >> > That was an episode I didn't see, unfortunately, but I read the chapter
> >> > in his Cook's Tour book about that meal at the French Laundry.
> >> > Bourdain says it's the only restaurant on earth that is so great he
> >> > doesn't mind not being able to smoke there. And then when it came for
> >> > dessert, Thomas Keller, the FL chef, knew Bourdain's tastes well enough
> >> > to create for him a dessert infused with tobacco!
> >> >
> >> I have only his book "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines" which I take
> >> with me to read for waiting purposes and have not got through it --
> >> I see in that book, he has listed other titles,
> >> "Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly"
> >> "Bone in the Throat"
> >> "Gone Bamboo"
> >> "Typhod Mary (an urban Historical)"
> >>
> >> Would you know which of these books the French Laundry experience was in?
> >>
> >> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
> >> probably other things?) takes on him.

> >
> > It's in his book A Cook's Tour, in a chapter called "West Coast." It's
> > one of the most entertaining chapters in the book. He gives a bunch of
> > CA. vegetarians the chance to convert him to vegetarianism ("Not one of
> > them could cook a ****ing vegetable," he concludes), then goes to SF,
> > where he makes note of all the prostitution, junkies, and homelessness,
> > and finds it strange that in such an environment he has trouble finding
> > a spot where he can smoke some tobacco. Finally he ends up with a
> > positive note, his dinner at the French Laundry.
> >
> > Yeah, smoking's a lousy habit and it has taken a toll on Bourdain. Did
> > you see the Chinese episode of "No Reservations"? He tries bicycle
> > riding but doesn't make it too far.

>
> Hmm, The book I have is also entitled "A Cook's Tour" in large letters, but
> in smaller letters, "Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines." I'm wondering
> if these are a series of books of "A Cook's Tour" with each one of them
> being under a different category/title.


It's the same book with different subtitles. My copy with the "Global
Adventures..." subtitle is softback, with a series of photos in the
center that aren't in my other hardbacked copy of the book.

> I've got the Chinese episode recorded from a few weeks ago. I'm looking
> forward to seeing it.


The Chinese episode is good. His reactions to the local booze are
funny ("That's pretty much paint-thinner," etc.). There's a scene
where he eats some really nasty-looking cow stomach parts and tofu
by-product. Also he eats some delicious looking stuff -- roasted duck,
noodles, etc.

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> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Dee Randall wrote:
>> "Nancy Young" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >
>> > "Dee Randall" > wrote
>> >
>> >> Yes, Bourdain's is really a smoker, and you can tell the toll it (and
>> >> probably other things?) takes on him.
>> >
>> > I believe he's a recovering (?) heroin addict. I think he's
>> > really likeable and pretty damm funny. Did you see him in
>> > Japan with the vending machines, so funny.
>> >
>> > nancy

>>
>> I haven't seen that yet (as far as my fading memory serves me - short
>> term
>> memory loss). I have the Asian (and Japan) recorded and all I can get.
>> We
>> watch one when we can. DH and I both enjoy the shows.
>> He's certainly more entertaining than most of the travel/food shows --
>> maybe too over-the-top for some, tho.
>>
>> I figured he had or had/had a problem with drugs. Too darned skinny.

>
> He was on the Letterman show several months ago, and Letterman teased
> Bourdain about how he didn't have an ounce of fat on him. Then
> Letterman observed that, in most of his travel shows, Bourdain seemed
> to smoke a lot and consume a lot of the local spirits. "That's how I
> get to keep this girlish figure," Bourdain quipped.


I would've loved to seen that. Letterman and he must've been a pair -- a
pair of skeletons. So! Bourdain also knows that he has girly legs and girly
arms; must've been his intent.
Anyway, I hope he's beat the heroin.
Dee Dee




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In article >,
"Dee Randall" > wrote:


> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French Laundry
> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!


I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The roast
chicken from the book is the best.

marcella


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"Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>
>
>> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French
>> Laundry
>> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
>> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!

>
> I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The roast
> chicken from the book is the best.
>
> marcella


Thanks for the tip, Marcella. I'll check this recipe.
Dee Dee


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Grizzman wrote:
> Who are you favorite TV chefs


Julia
Ina Garten

>and real Chefs,


Susan Goss
http://www.fabuloustravel.com/gourme...l/zin/zin.html

I met her and Drew when they opened SNAX/Something Different in
Indianapolis. We ate there all the time and became friends. They're
friends with Bayless, and he helped them open Zinfandel.

They now run West Town Taven in Chicago:
http://www.westtowntavern.com/

I'm also friends with Jack Kennedy (have known him since I was about
10) who is the chef at Chicago Firehouse:
http://chicagofirehouse.com/

-L.

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Fictional:

Master Chu, from "Eat Drink Man Woman":
http://www.americanphoto.co.jp/pages...lans-32385.jpg

John Cleese
http://www.monty-pythons.com/album/E...ant-sketch.jpg


Real (TV):

James Barber
http://www.james-barber.com/index.asp

Justin Wilson (" I GARONTEE!")

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Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> > In real life: Me. I'm amazing.

>
> That's funny. Me is my favorite chef, too. And I thought nobody else
> knew about him!
>
> --Blair
> "Now I'm gonna have to find a new place..."




It's a Her not a Him! It's Me!

On a serious note, DH and I had a restaurant dinner out this week -
sorta middle of the road - and the meals were just not up to scratch.
Not counting when we dine out with our friends at restaurants (the
company makes up for so-so food), it so often seems to be a
disappointment.
We decided the best meals are ones we cook at home using really good
ingredients and inspiring recipes from my cookbooks and rec.cooking.
Our friends love getting an invitation to our dinner table!

Tonight I am cooking fresh salmon slices with an asian flavour (kaffir
lime leaf and lime slice, fresh ginger, dash of soy sauce and fish
sauce and a dash of mirrin wine) wrapped in cooking parchment
(individual). The parcels are baked at a high oven temp. for about 10
min. I'll serve it with a little white rice mould on the side and some
steamed beans with red pepper strips.
Dessert is poached pears in white wine with the liquid then reduced
right down, and a couple of passionfruits squeezed into the sauce as it
cools.

--
Bronnie

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On Fri, 26 May 2006 00:09:46 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:

>
> "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> >
> >
> >> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French
> >> Laundry
> >> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
> >> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!

> >
> > I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> > Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The roast
> > chicken from the book is the best.
> >
> > marcella

>
> Thanks for the tip, Marcella. I'll check this recipe.
> Dee Dee
>



Since when is http://www.leshalles.net/locations.php just down the
street from http://www.frenchlaundry.com ?
--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.


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In article >,
sf > wrote:

> On Fri, 26 May 2006 00:09:46 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:
>
> >
> > "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > In article >,
> > > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > >> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French
> > >> Laundry
> > >> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
> > >> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!
> > >
> > > I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> > > Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The roast
> > > chicken from the book is the best.
> > >
> > > marcella

> >
> > Thanks for the tip, Marcella. I'll check this recipe.
> > Dee Dee
> >

>
>
> Since when is http://www.leshalles.net/locations.php just down the
> street from http://www.frenchlaundry.com ?


Read more carefully this time

> > >I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> > > Laundry


Bouchon is just down the street from French Laundry. No mention of Les
Halles.

marcella
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"Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> sf > wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 26 May 2006 00:09:46 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:
>>
>> >
>> > "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> > > In article >,
>> > > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French
>> > >> Laundry
>> > >> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would
>> > attempt.
>> > >> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the
>> > better!
>> > >
>> > > I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of
>> > his
>> > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from
>> > French
>> > > Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The
>> > roast
>> > > chicken from the book is the best.
>> > >
>> > > marcella
>> >
>> > Thanks for the tip, Marcella. I'll check this recipe.
>> > Dee Dee
>> >

>>
>>
>> Since when is http://www.leshalles.net/locations.php just down the
>> street from http://www.frenchlaundry.com ?

>
> Read more carefully this time
>
>> > >I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of
>> > his
>> > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from
>> > French
>> > > Laundry

>
> Bouchon is just down the street from French Laundry. No mention of Les
> Halles.
>
> marcella


I was looking at the
Bouchon Las Vegas menu.
http://www.frenchlaundry.com/bouchonLV/BOLVmenu1205.pdf
I've heard that prices of dinners at Las Vegas has gone up tremendously.
But when I look at the price there at Bouchon LV, I don't think it is THAT
outrageous. With the exception of pommes frittes & steak at $34.50, the rest
of the dinners are below $30; this is in line with other good restaurants
(IMO).

We were discussing this at breakfast this a.m. and was wondering who is the
chef at Thomas Keller's Bouchon LV, and at Bouchon near the French Laundry.
Does he run back and forth between --
Does Batali run between his restaurants.

Just curious if anyone knows.
The titles must mean something, too.
Dee Dee


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On Sat, 27 May 2006 08:00:37 -0700, Marcella Peek wrote:

> In article >,
> sf > wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 26 May 2006 00:09:46 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > "Marcella Peek" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > In article >,
> > > > "Dee Randall" > wrote:
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >> I'm going to have to take another look at the Les Halles and French
> > > >> Laundry
> > > >> Cookbooks, although there are probably no receipes that I would attempt.
> > > >> Love reading cookbooks. When travel is thrown in, so much the better!
> > > >
> > > > I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> > > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> > > > Laundry and is wonderful too but a casual bistro type place. The roast
> > > > chicken from the book is the best.
> > > >
> > > > marcella
> > >
> > > Thanks for the tip, Marcella. I'll check this recipe.
> > > Dee Dee
> > >

> >
> >
> > Since when is http://www.leshalles.net/locations.php just down the
> > street from http://www.frenchlaundry.com ?

>
> Read more carefully this time
>
> > > >I like to look at the French Laundry book but I do often cook out of his
> > > > Bouchon cookbook. The restaurant is just down the street from French
> > > > Laundry

>
> Bouchon is just down the street from French Laundry. No mention of Les
> Halles.
>

I was responding correctly to the resoponse.
--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
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On Sat, 27 May 2006 11:17:07 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:

> I was looking at the
> Bouchon Las Vegas menu.
> http://www.frenchlaundry.com/bouchonLV/BOLVmenu1205.pdf
> I've heard that prices of dinners at Las Vegas has gone up tremendously.
> But when I look at the price there at Bouchon LV, I don't think it is THAT
> outrageous. With the exception of pommes frittes & steak at $34.50, the rest
> of the dinners are below $30; this is in line with other good restaurants
> (IMO).
>
> We were discussing this at breakfast this a.m. and was wondering who is the
> chef at Thomas Keller's Bouchon LV, and at Bouchon near the French Laundry.
> Does he run back and forth between --
> Does Batali run between his restaurants.
>
> Just curious if anyone knows.
> The titles must mean something, too.


I've read that Hubert Keller hops between San Francisco and Las Vegas
to keep an eye on his operations <http://www.fleurdelyssf.com/>, so it
stands to reason that other celebrity chefs would do it also - if they
want to keep the food & service up to their standards.

--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
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"sf" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 27 May 2006 11:17:07 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:
>
>> I was looking at the
>> Bouchon Las Vegas menu.
>> http://www.frenchlaundry.com/bouchonLV/BOLVmenu1205.pdf
>> I've heard that prices of dinners at Las Vegas has gone up tremendously.
>> But when I look at the price there at Bouchon LV, I don't think it is
>> THAT
>> outrageous. With the exception of pommes frittes & steak at $34.50, the
>> rest
>> of the dinners are below $30; this is in line with other good
>> restaurants
>> (IMO).
>>
>> We were discussing this at breakfast this a.m. and was wondering who is
>> the
>> chef at Thomas Keller's Bouchon LV, and at Bouchon near the French
>> Laundry.
>> Does he run back and forth between --
>> Does Batali run between his restaurants.
>>
>> Just curious if anyone knows.
>> The titles must mean something, too.

>
> I've read that Hubert Keller hops between San Francisco and Las Vegas
> to keep an eye on his operations <http://www.fleurdelyssf.com/>, so it
> stands to reason that other celebrity chefs would do it also - if they
> want to keep the food & service up to their standards.
>
> --

His chef's coat is REALLY clean!
I see he's instructing, too.
How's about a hair-net for the beard -- tee hee.
JUST KIDDING!

Oh, oh, I was thinking that Chef Keller's 2restaurants were in NYC, then
another in LV -- but I know different. Perhaps they have corporate jets or
fast cars.
Dee Dee


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