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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
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Default Peking Duck

Michael wrote:

> Peking Duck

<snip>
> Clean duck. Wipe dry and tie string around neck.
>
> Hang duck in cool, windy place 4 hours.
>
> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion, honey,
> vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved cornstarch. Stir
> constantly.
>
> Place duck in large strainer above larger bowl. Scoop boiling mixture all
> over duck for about 10 minutes.
>
> Hang duck again in cool, windy place for 6 hours until thoroughly dry.
>
> Place duck breast side up on a greased rack in oven preheated to 350
> degrees. Set a pan filled with 2 inches of water in bottom of oven. (This
> is for drippings). Roast 30 minutes.


You (or Zhou) left out the part about separating the skin from the flesh, so
that the fat will render more easily and the skin will crisp better.

Bob


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joe positive
 
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Default

Dog3 wrote:


> Hang duck in cool, windy place 4 hours.
>
> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion, honey,
> vinegar, and
> sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>
> Place duck in large strainer above larger bowl. Scoop boiling mixture all
> over duck
> for about 10 minutes.
>
> Hang duck again in cool, windy place for 6 hours until thoroughly dry.


What if the wind isn't blowing?

--
live! vicariously!
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
elaine
 
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> Michael wrote:


> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.


Hey Michael,

This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.

Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is filling
it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do (after all the
seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work too???

Elaine


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
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Default

elaine wrote:
[snip]>
> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
> too???


A deep pot will of course work, if it's big enough. The cookbook
author can be more confident that a large wok will be big enough
because of its shape. As to the wok's seasoning, this won't hurt it.
After it's been washed and dried, just look at it, and if it seems to
need a bit of oil, reheat the wok and wipe on the oil. After all, we
make soup in woks, too, sometimes, and long-simmering braises. The
question is just what pan, pot, or wok fits whatever you're making.

-aem

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sun 06 Mar 2005 04:22:31p, joe positive wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Dog3 wrote:
>
>
>> Hang duck in cool, windy place 4 hours.
>>
>> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion, honey,
>> vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved cornstarch. Stir
>> constantly.
>>
>> Place duck in large strainer above larger bowl. Scoop boiling mixture
>> all over duck
>> for about 10 minutes.
>>
>> Hang duck again in cool, windy place for 6 hours until thoroughly dry.

>
> What if the wind isn't blowing?
>


I've seen recipes that suggesting using a portable fan.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
elaine
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dog3" > wrote in message
1...
> "elaine" > wrote in
> :
>
> >
> > > Michael wrote:

> >
> >> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
> >> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
> >> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.

> >
> > Hey Michael,
> >
> > This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
> >
> > Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
> > filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
> > (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
> > too???
> >
> > Elaine
> >
> >
> >

>
> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I should.
> The duck is still airing.


LOL - Well good luck..............

Take out perhaps?

Elaine


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> "elaine" > wrote in
> :
>
>>
>> > Michael wrote:

>>
>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.

>>
>> Hey Michael,
>>
>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>
>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>> too???
>>
>> Elaine
>>
>>
>>

>
> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
> should. The duck is still airing.
>
> Michael


Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
and not attempted it at home. <g>

Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
"traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
I've encountered!

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Wayne replied:

>>> Hang duck again in cool, windy place for 6 hours until thoroughly dry.

>>
>> What if the wind isn't blowing?
>>

>
> I've seen recipes that suggesting using a portable fan.


You can speed up the process even further using a hair dryer. It's a
standard technique in similar recipes.

Bob


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> "elaine" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>
>>> Hey Michael,
>>>
>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>> too???
>>>
>>> Elaine
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>
>> Michael

>
> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>
> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
> of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
> patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
> I've encountered!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered in....wait....
you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!

Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros and
I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries it, I
want a report!

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> "elaine" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>
>>> Hey Michael,
>>>
>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>> too???
>>>
>>> Elaine
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>
>> Michael

>
> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>
> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
> of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
> patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
> I've encountered!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered in....wait....
you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!

Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros and
I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries it, I
want a report!

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> "elaine" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>
>>> Hey Michael,
>>>
>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>> too???
>>>
>>> Elaine
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>
>> Michael

>
> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>
> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
> of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
> patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
> I've encountered!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered in....wait....
you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!

Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros and
I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries it, I
want a report!

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> "elaine" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>
>>> Hey Michael,
>>>
>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>> too???
>>>
>>> Elaine
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>
>> Michael

>
> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>
> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
> of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
> patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
> I've encountered!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered in....wait....
you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!

Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros and
I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries it, I
want a report!

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> "elaine" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>>>
>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>
>>> Hey Michael,
>>>
>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>> too???
>>>
>>> Elaine
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>
>> Michael

>
> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>
> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5 years
> of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden egg
> patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other versions
> I've encountered!
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered in....wait....
you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!

Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros and
I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries it, I
want a report!

Bret



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default

On Sun 06 Mar 2005 07:22:06p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>> "elaine" > wrote in
>>> :
>>>
>>>>
>>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>>
>>>> Hey Michael,
>>>>
>>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>>
>>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok, is
>>>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>>> too???
>>>>
>>>> Elaine
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>>
>>> Michael

>>
>> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese restaurants
>> and not attempted it at home. <g>
>>
>> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
>> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5
>> years of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp
>> laden egg patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the
>> other versions I've encountered!
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright

>
> I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered
> in....wait.... you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!
>
> Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos Rancheros
> and I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries
> it, I want a report!
>
> Bret


You can be sure I'd never try it! The traditional style I always found
back in Ohio and east to NY were thickesh patties where all ingredients
except the gravy were contained in the patty, and served with a brown
gravy. What I've found here in AZ has been a variety of preparations.
Most often, the dish appears with several patties of egg, a small amount of
beansprouts and maybe bamboo shoots, the patties then covered up with a
heaping amount of whatever variety one ordered, such as vegetable or shrimp
or pork with vegetables. It's almost as though one had ordered another
main dish item which was poured over the patties, and the patties contained
next to nothing. Then there is the scrambled version, where what would
ordinarily be the content of the patties is prepared like scrambled eggs,
often with no gravy but occasionally a bit of gravy poured over. One other
version I was served was a very thin patty with most of the traditional
ingredients mixed in, but it was only about 1/4" thick and was so large it
overlapped the serving platter. Gravy was served on the side.

I'm so thankful I found this place last Friday!


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Maverick wrote:
> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
> >
> >> "elaine" > wrote in
> >> :
> >>
> >>>
> >>> > Michael wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger,

scallion,
> >>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
> >>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
> >>>
> >>> Hey Michael,
> >>>
> >>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
> >>>
> >>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok,

is
> >>> filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
> >>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
> >>> too???
> >>>
> >>> Elaine
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
> >> should. The duck is still airing.
> >>
> >> Michael

> >
> > Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese

restaurants
> > and not attempted it at home. <g>
> >
> > Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes

the
> > "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5

years
> > of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp laden

egg
> > patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the other

versions
> > I've encountered!
> >
> > --
> > Wayne Boatwright

>
> I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered

in....wait....
> you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!
>
> Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos

Rancheros and
> I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if anyone tries

it, I
> want a report!
>
> Bret


Great. What a POS access I have through my ISP. Sorry for spamming
the group with the same post, over and over and over.

This really irks me. I've got a couple of follow up posts and now I
can't even spam the group with them! grrrrhhhh... And! I have no idea
how the google access works. I should've quit when I was behind!

Again, sorry for the extra message spamming.

Bret

> ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet

News==----
> http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!

120,000+ Newsgroups
> ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption

=----



  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun 06 Mar 2005 08:10:20p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
> Maverick wrote:
>> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>> >
>> >> "elaine" > wrote in
>> >> :
>> >>
>> >>>
>> >>> > Michael wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger,
>> >>>> >> scallion, honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in
>> >>>> >> dissolved cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>> >>>
>> >>> Hey Michael,
>> >>>
>> >>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>> >>>
>> >>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok,
>> >>> is filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to
>> >>> do (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might
>> >>> work too???
>> >>>
>> >>> Elaine
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>> >> should. The duck is still airing.
>> >>
>> >> Michael
>> >
>> > Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese
>> > restaurants and not attempted it at home. <g>
>> >
>> > Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
>> > "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5
>> > years of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp
>> > laden egg patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the
>> > other versions I've encountered!
>> >
>> > --
>> > Wayne Boatwright

>>
>> I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered
>> in....wait.... you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!
>>
>> Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos
>> Rancheros and I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if
>> anyone tries it, I want a report!
>>
>> Bret

>
> Great. What a POS access I have through my ISP. Sorry for spamming
> the group with the same post, over and over and over.
>
> This really irks me. I've got a couple of follow up posts and now I
> can't even spam the group with them! grrrrhhhh... And! I have no idea
> how the google access works. I should've quit when I was behind!
>
> Again, sorry for the extra message spamming.
>
> Bret


No problem. It happens.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dog3" > wrote in message
...
> "Maverick" > wrote in
> :
>
>> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Sun 06 Mar 2005 06:33:26p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>
>>>> "elaine" > wrote in
>>>> :
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> > Michael wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> >> Fill large wok with water. Bring to boil. Add ginger, scallion,
>>>>>> >> honey, vinegar, and sherry. Bring to boil. Pour in dissolved
>>>>>> >> cornstarch. Stir constantly.
>>>>>
>>>>> Hey Michael,
>>>>>
>>>>> This sounds like a neat recipe. I've never made Peking Duck.
>>>>>
>>>>> Only thing I'm wondering about, since I'm practicing with my Wok,
>>>>> is filling it with water. I thought that wasn't a good thing to do
>>>>> (after all the seasonings and all) - guess a deep pot might work
>>>>> too???
>>>>>
>>>>> Elaine
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'm lost here. My wok is not huge. I may have taken on more than I
>>>> should. The duck is still airing.
>>>>
>>>> Michael
>>>
>>> Probably one of the reasons I've only ordered it in Chinese
>>> restaurants and not attempted it at home. <g>
>>>
>>> Of Chinese restaurants, on Friday I finally found one that makes the
>>> "traditional" Cantonese style version of egg foo yung, this after 5
>>> years of searching the entire valley of Phoenix. Veggie and shrimp
>>> laden egg patties napped in a brown sauce. You wouldn't believe the
>>> other versions I've encountered!
>>>
>>> --
>>> Wayne Boatwright

>>
>> I can only imagine! "Chili Verde Huevos Foo Young"! Covered
>> in....wait.... you guessed it.... Salsa Verde!
>>
>> Now, don't take me wrong. I like Chili Verde. I like Huevos
>> Rancheros and I even like Egg Foo Young. But grosses me out but if
>> anyone tries it, I want a report!
>>
>> Bret

>
> Bret, I want Chili Verde recipes. I love the stuff.
>
> Michael <- snugging with Missy and Shelly snacking on Cheese corn


Michael,

This is off the cuff so I may leave something out or get the amounts wrong.
Since we don't really have a recipe for it, you'll have to adjust
accordingly if I say something totally out of whack.

5-6lb pork roast (We use whatever we have on hand)
Fresh Hatch green chili (use as much or as little you like.) (We use Hatch
green chilies since we visit the In-laws every September and roast and peal
a bunch of them.)
1-2 Tablespoons of flour.
S&P to taste
Garlic (depends on how much chili you use)

1. Cube the roast to the size you like.

2. Throw in large pot over med-high heat and sprinkle the flour over meat
and stir. S&P to taste. I add a little bit of fresh garlic to the meat but
that's just me.

3. While the meat is browning and getting to at least medium rare, dice up
the green chili and mix with garlic. The garlic does something to the chili
but I couldn't begin to tell you what and the wife isn't here to ask.

4. After the meat is cooked, fill the pot with water. You could use beef
stock if you want but I've never tried it.

5. Add the chili verde (green chilies) and let it simmer a while. We
usually let it simmer for about an hour.

The result *should* be somewhat thicker than watery but not really as thick
as a stew.

That's it. A nice quick, simple, one-pot recipe that doesn't require a
degree from the CIA. My wife learned it from her mom (and the MIL can
cook!) who learned it from her mom who...Well, you get the drift.

There aren't a lot of ingredients but you'll be amazed at the flavor.

Oh, one other thing. No two batches will ever taste quite the same
obviously, but more importantly, the heat levels will never be the same.
You can make one batch that makes you think you made it with green bell
peppers and the next batch will take the enamel off your teeth.

LOL. This is a proud moment for me. This is my first recipe, if you can
call it that, that I've ever posted to RFC!

Let me know what you think.

Bret



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I'm with you, Wayne. Roast duck I'll try at home. Peking Duck I leave
to those who know what they're doing. Fortunately, I have a restaurant
near home that makes very good Peking Duck.

Melissa

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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 08 Mar 2005 06:51:50p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> I'm with you, Wayne. Roast duck I'll try at home. Peking Duck I leave
> to those who know what they're doing. Fortunately, I have a restaurant
> near home that makes very good Peking Duck.
>
> Melissa


Roast duck is my favorite fowl to make at home, although I eagerly order it
in a good restarant as well.

The most beautifully prepared and deliciouis rost duck I've ever been served
dates back to a birthday dinner in the 1970's. The half duckling was
completely boned including breast, thigh, leg, etc. The skin was wonderfully
crisp and was glazed with a brandy and fresh morello cherry sauce,
accompanied with a generous amount of plump morellos. I'll never forget it,
and I won't try to duplicate it. I don't think I could. :-(

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Maverick
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue 08 Mar 2005 06:51:50p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>
>> I'm with you, Wayne. Roast duck I'll try at home. Peking Duck I leave
>> to those who know what they're doing. Fortunately, I have a restaurant
>> near home that makes very good Peking Duck.
>>
>> Melissa

>
> Roast duck is my favorite fowl to make at home, although I eagerly order
> it
> in a good restarant as well.
>
> The most beautifully prepared and deliciouis rost duck I've ever been
> served
> dates back to a birthday dinner in the 1970's. The half duckling was
> completely boned including breast, thigh, leg, etc. The skin was
> wonderfully
> crisp and was glazed with a brandy and fresh morello cherry sauce,
> accompanied with a generous amount of plump morellos. I'll never forget
> it,
> and I won't try to duplicate it. I don't think I could. :-(
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright


I don't even think you should. Keep the memories.

Bret



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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 08 Mar 2005 07:29:30p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Tue 08 Mar 2005 06:51:50p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>> I'm with you, Wayne. Roast duck I'll try at home. Peking Duck I leave
>>> to those who know what they're doing. Fortunately, I have a
>>> restaurant near home that makes very good Peking Duck.
>>>
>>> Melissa

>>
>> Roast duck is my favorite fowl to make at home, although I eagerly
>> order it in a good restarant as well.
>>
>> The most beautifully prepared and deliciouis rost duck I've ever been
>> served dates back to a birthday dinner in the 1970's. The half
>> duckling was completely boned including breast, thigh, leg, etc. The
>> skin was wonderfully crisp and was glazed with a brandy and fresh
>> morello cherry sauce, accompanied with a generous amount of plump
>> morellos. I'll never forget it, and I won't try to duplicate it. I
>> don't think I could. :-(
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright

>
> I don't even think you should. Keep the memories.
>
> Bret


You're right. Thanks!

Wayne
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 09 Mar 2005 04:14:01p, Dog3 wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Wayne Boatwright > wrote in
> :
>
>> On Tue 08 Mar 2005 07:29:30p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>
>>> "Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Tue 08 Mar 2005 06:51:50p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:
>>>>
>>>>> I'm with you, Wayne. Roast duck I'll try at home. Peking Duck I
>>>>> leave to those who know what they're doing. Fortunately, I have a
>>>>> restaurant near home that makes very good Peking Duck.
>>>>>
>>>>> Melissa
>>>>
>>>> Roast duck is my favorite fowl to make at home, although I eagerly
>>>> order it in a good restarant as well.
>>>>
>>>> The most beautifully prepared and deliciouis rost duck I've ever been
>>>> served dates back to a birthday dinner in the 1970's. The half
>>>> duckling was completely boned including breast, thigh, leg, etc. The
>>>> skin was wonderfully crisp and was glazed with a brandy and fresh
>>>> morello cherry sauce, accompanied with a generous amount of plump
>>>> morellos. I'll never forget it, and I won't try to duplicate it. I
>>>> don't think I could. :-(
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Wayne Boatwright
>>>
>>> I don't even think you should. Keep the memories.
>>>
>>> Bret

>>
>> You're right. Thanks!
>>
>> Wayne
>>

>
> We're still eating the duck. I got it on sale and Gawd, it's lasting
> forever. The leftovers are good. I'm looking for things to do with
> leftovers.
>
> Michael


One duck? It must have been as big as a goose! <g> We each half a duck
for a dinner.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
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Bob
 
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Michael wrote:

> We're still eating the duck. I got it on sale and Gawd, it's lasting
> forever. The leftovers are good. I'm looking for things to do with
> leftovers.


Cut down the following recipe in proportion to the amount of duck you have
left:

Spicy Shredded Duck Salad (from _Chopstix_)

SALAD
1 Chinese roast duck
12 ounces spinach leaves
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded red cabbage
1/2 cup slivered almonds
4 cups cooking oil (for deep-frying)
2 ounces rice sticks

DRESSING
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
2 tablespoons Oriental sesame oil
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese chili sauce
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
2 cloves finely minced garlic

ADVANCE PREPARATION: Remove all the meat from the duck and discard the skin.
Shred the duck meat. Wash and thoroughly dry the spinach, then bunch
together and cut into very thin slivers. Set out the carrots and cabbage.
Roast the almonds in a 325°F oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes.

Heat the oil in a 10-inch skillet set over medium-high heat to 375°F. Test
with a strand of rice stick; it will puff up immediately when the oil is
ready. Add a small number of rice sticks at a time. As soon as they
expand, in about 5 seconds, turn the rice sticks over with chopsticks or
tongs and push them back into the hot oil to cook for 5 more seconds. Drain
on paper towels while you fry the remaining rice sticks.

Combine all the ingredients for the dressing and mix well.

LAST-MINUTE ASSEMBLING: Place all the salad ingredients except the rice
sticks in a very large salad bowl. Shake the dressing and add half to the
salad. Toss immediately. Gently fold in the rice sticks, being careful not
to crush them. Taste the salad and add more dressing for a more pronounced
flavor, but be careful that the rice sticks do not become soggy. Serve at
once.

Serves 4 as an entrée, or 6 to 8 as a salad course


Bob


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