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Old 01-11-2015, 10:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Walmart sells their products under the Stouffer's name, superb!
http://www.stuffed-foods.com/
Tonight's dinner is Spinach, Kale, & Mozz Ravioli with pork shoulder
chop tomato sauce that I made a while ago.

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Old 01-11-2015, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 01 Nov 2015 17:33:48 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

Walmart sells their products under the Stouffer's name, superb!
http://www.stuffed-foods.com/
Tonight's dinner is Spinach, Kale, & Mozz Ravioli with pork shoulder
chop tomato sauce that I made a while ago.


I would rather starve than eat anything from a MalWart!!

John Kuthe...
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Old 01-11-2015, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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John Kuthe wrote:
I would rather starve than eat anything from a MalWart!!




http://fee.org/freeman/wal-mart-is-g...r-the-economy/

Wal-Mart and Small Communities

The claim that Wal-Mart “disregards the concerns of small communities”
is also contradicted by the evidence. If Wal-Mart’s stores were not in
tune with the concerns of shoppers in small communities, the stores
wouldn’t make a profit and would eventually shut down. If Wal-Mart’s
stores were not in tune with the concerns of job seekers in those
communities, the stores wouldn’t be able to staff their operations. The
concerns that Wal-Mart rightly disregards are those of local businesses
that would prefer not to have to deal with new competition. The absence
of rigorous competition leads to high prices in many small communities.
While this may be good for the profit margins of established businesses,
it is not necessarily a condition to be preferred over the benefits for
the majority of the inhabitants of the community that result from robust
competition.

Wal-Mart runs the largest corporate cash-giving foundation in America.
In 2004 Wal-Mart donated over $170 million. More than 90 percent of
these donations went to charities in the communities served by Wal-Mart
stores.7

From an economic perspective, when all the claims are dispassionately
evaluated it looks like Wal-Mart promotes prosperity. The company is
helping consumers get more for their money. It is providing jobs for
willing employees. It is stimulating its suppliers to achieve greater
economies in manufacturing. It is encouraging trade with less-developed
economies, helping the inhabitants of Third World nations to improve
their standards of living. Far from “disregarding the concerns of small
communities,” Wal-Mart offers an appealing place to shop and work.

Wal-Mart is doing all these good things and making a profit of around $9
billion a year.This is a profit margin of less than 4 percent.That’s
mighty efficient. To call Wal-Mart a “corporate criminal” is slander.
Wal-Mart is a model of how successful capitalism is supposed to work. It
is a company that should be emulated, not reviled.

http://business.time.com/2012/06/04/...oming-to-town/

Homeowners, local chambers of commerce, and town planners alike all have
some assumptions about Walmart. It’s often assumed that when a new
Walmart opens in town, it’ll kill small businesses and may even hurt the
local real estate market. But researchers say the effects of Walmart on
a surrounding town are sometimes surprising: The numbers indicate that
the presence of the big-box retailer may actually be good for home
values and some small businesses—though not so good for waistlines.

In a new paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research,
Devin Pope and Jaren Pope, economists from the University of Chicago and
Brigham Young University, respectively, investigated what the
introduction of a Walmart store did to nearby home values in communities
around the U.S. After analyzing 600,000 home purchases between 2001 and
2006 in the vicinity of 159 new Walmarts, they found that homes located
within half a mile of the Walmart rose in value 2% to 3% more relative
to homes that weren’t close to the mammoth retailer. Homes located
between .5-mile and one mile from Walmart also saw a boost in value,
though it tended to be slightly smaller, with prices increasing 1% to 2%.

But the study also revealed that many other businesses were given a
boost by the presence of Walmart. A CBS News story about the research noted:

Those selling products and, especially, services that Walmart doesn’t
will tend to do well. Again, because shoppers arrive near Walmart ready
to spend, they tend to leave their money with whomever nearby is selling
what they want.
Researchers noted that over time—often, a LONG period of time—the
storefronts shuttered as a result of an inability to compete with
Walmart tend to eventually be occupied by restaurants, boutique
retailers, professional offices, and other services and businesses that
do not try to compete with Walmart.



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Old 01-11-2015, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 32
Default Good Eats

Sqwertz wrote:
I think you bumped your widdle head again.


No one cares, you woman-stalking subhuman VIRUS!

Have you not grasped your reign of terror here is done?


Steve Wertz - unrepentant woman stalker and total head case begging poor
Omelet to shoot him with a sniper rifle in austin.food:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ost

3/18/2011 3:49 PM
Microsoft Internet News 4.70.1162
readnews.com - News for Geeks and ISPs
fa35d278.newsreader.readnews.com


Sorry I don't fit either of your Ideal Psycho Pal Profiles.

-sw
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'd prefer you use a sniper rifle on me from a few hundred yards away.
There you go - a reason for you to buy yet another gun and ammo.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



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Old 02-11-2015, 12:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 13,197
Default Good Eats

Carizozo wrote in rec.food.cooking:

John Kuthe wrote:
I would rather starve than eat anything from a MalWart!!




http://fee.org/freeman/wal-mart-is-g...r-the-economy/

Wal-Mart and Small Communities

The claim that Wal-Mart “disregards the concerns of small
communities” is also contradicted by the evidence. If Wal-Mart’s
stores were not in tune with the concerns of shoppers in small
communities, the stores wouldn’t make a profit and would eventually
shut down. If Wal-Mart’s stores were not in tune with the concerns of
job seekers in those communities, the stores wouldn’t be able to
staff their operations. The concerns that Wal-Mart rightly disregards
are those of local businesses that would prefer not to have to deal
with new competition. The absence of rigorous competition leads to
high prices in many small communities. While this may be good for the
profit margins of established businesses, it is not necessarily a
condition to be preferred over the benefits for the majority of the
inhabitants of the community that result from robust competition.

Wal-Mart runs the largest corporate cash-giving foundation in
America. In 2004 Wal-Mart donated over $170 million. More than 90
percent of these donations went to charities in the communities
served by Wal-Mart stores.7

From an economic perspective, when all the claims are dispassionately
evaluated it looks like Wal-Mart promotes prosperity. The company is
helping consumers get more for their money. It is providing jobs for
willing employees. It is stimulating its suppliers to achieve greater
economies in manufacturing. It is encouraging trade with
less-developed economies, helping the inhabitants of Third World
nations to improve their standards of living. Far from “disregarding
the concerns of small communities,” Wal-Mart offers an appealing
place to shop and work.

Wal-Mart is doing all these good things and making a profit of around
$9 billion a year.This is a profit margin of less than 4
percent.That’s mighty efficient. To call Wal-Mart a “corporate
criminal” is slander. Wal-Mart is a model of how successful
capitalism is supposed to work. It is a company that should be
emulated, not reviled.

http://business.time.com/2012/06/04/...ts-of-walmart-
coming-to-town/

Homeowners, local chambers of commerce, and town planners alike all
have some assumptions about Walmart. It’s often assumed that when a
new Walmart opens in town, it’ll kill small businesses and may even
hurt the local real estate market. But researchers say the effects of
Walmart on a surrounding town are sometimes surprising: The numbers
indicate that the presence of the big-box retailer may actually be
good for home values and some small businesses—though not so good for
waistlines.

In a new paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research,
Devin Pope and Jaren Pope, economists from the University of Chicago
and Brigham Young University, respectively, investigated what the
introduction of a Walmart store did to nearby home values in
communities around the U.S. After analyzing 600,000 home purchases
between 2001 and 2006 in the vicinity of 159 new Walmarts, they found
that homes located within half a mile of the Walmart rose in value 2%
to 3% more relative to homes that weren’t close to the mammoth
retailer. Homes located between .5-mile and one mile from Walmart
also saw a boost in value, though it tended to be slightly smaller,
with prices increasing 1% to 2%.

But the study also revealed that many other businesses were given a
boost by the presence of Walmart. A CBS News story about the research
noted:

Those selling products and, especially, services that Walmart doesn’t
will tend to do well. Again, because shoppers arrive near Walmart
ready to spend, they tend to leave their money with whomever nearby
is selling what they want. Researchers noted that over time—often, a
LONG period of time—the storefronts shuttered as a result of an
inability to compete with Walmart tend to eventually be occupied by
restaurants, boutique retailers, professional offices, and other
services and businesses that do not try to compete with Walmart.


Want to check on how much tax they pay vs normal places?

--



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Old 02-11-2015, 12:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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cshenk wrote:
Carizozo wrote in rec.food.cooking:

John Kuthe wrote:
I would rather starve than eat anything from a MalWart!!




http://fee.org/freeman/wal-mart-is-g...r-the-economy/

Wal-Mart and Small Communities

The claim that Wal-Mart “disregards the concerns of small
communities” is also contradicted by the evidence. If Wal-Mart’s
stores were not in tune with the concerns of shoppers in small
communities, the stores wouldn’t make a profit and would eventually
shut down. If Wal-Mart’s stores were not in tune with the concerns of
job seekers in those communities, the stores wouldn’t be able to
staff their operations. The concerns that Wal-Mart rightly disregards
are those of local businesses that would prefer not to have to deal
with new competition. The absence of rigorous competition leads to
high prices in many small communities. While this may be good for the
profit margins of established businesses, it is not necessarily a
condition to be preferred over the benefits for the majority of the
inhabitants of the community that result from robust competition.

Wal-Mart runs the largest corporate cash-giving foundation in
America. In 2004 Wal-Mart donated over $170 million. More than 90
percent of these donations went to charities in the communities
served by Wal-Mart stores.7

From an economic perspective, when all the claims are dispassionately
evaluated it looks like Wal-Mart promotes prosperity. The company is
helping consumers get more for their money. It is providing jobs for
willing employees. It is stimulating its suppliers to achieve greater
economies in manufacturing. It is encouraging trade with
less-developed economies, helping the inhabitants of Third World
nations to improve their standards of living. Far from “disregarding
the concerns of small communities,” Wal-Mart offers an appealing
place to shop and work.

Wal-Mart is doing all these good things and making a profit of around
$9 billion a year.This is a profit margin of less than 4
percent.That’s mighty efficient. To call Wal-Mart a “corporate
criminal” is slander. Wal-Mart is a model of how successful
capitalism is supposed to work. It is a company that should be
emulated, not reviled.

http://business.time.com/2012/06/04/...ts-of-walmart-
coming-to-town/

Homeowners, local chambers of commerce, and town planners alike all
have some assumptions about Walmart. It’s often assumed that when a
new Walmart opens in town, it’ll kill small businesses and may even
hurt the local real estate market. But researchers say the effects of
Walmart on a surrounding town are sometimes surprising: The numbers
indicate that the presence of the big-box retailer may actually be
good for home values and some small businesses—though not so good for
waistlines.

In a new paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research,
Devin Pope and Jaren Pope, economists from the University of Chicago
and Brigham Young University, respectively, investigated what the
introduction of a Walmart store did to nearby home values in
communities around the U.S. After analyzing 600,000 home purchases
between 2001 and 2006 in the vicinity of 159 new Walmarts, they found
that homes located within half a mile of the Walmart rose in value 2%
to 3% more relative to homes that weren’t close to the mammoth
retailer. Homes located between .5-mile and one mile from Walmart
also saw a boost in value, though it tended to be slightly smaller,
with prices increasing 1% to 2%.

But the study also revealed that many other businesses were given a
boost by the presence of Walmart. A CBS News story about the research
noted:

Those selling products and, especially, services that Walmart doesn’t
will tend to do well. Again, because shoppers arrive near Walmart
ready to spend, they tend to leave their money with whomever nearby
is selling what they want. Researchers noted that over time—often, a
LONG period of time—the storefronts shuttered as a result of an
inability to compete with Walmart tend to eventually be occupied by
restaurants, boutique retailers, professional offices, and other
services and businesses that do not try to compete with Walmart.


Want to check on how much tax they pay vs normal places?


Sure.

First define "normal places".

The read the facts.

Wal Mart pays beaucoup taxes:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/...taxes/1991313/

These are the companies paying the most in taxes:

5. Wal-Mart
• Income tax expense: $7.98 billion
• Earnings before taxes: $25.74 billion
• Revenue: $469.16 billion
• 1-year share price change: 21.87%
• Industry: Supermarkets

Wal-Mart Stores (WMT) is the largest company in the United States and
the largest employer. Unlike some of the other companies on the highest
taxpayer list, particularly the banks and oil companies, Wal-Mart is
relatively young, founded in 1962. Since that time, expansion has
outpaced traditional American retailers, such as Sears, Kmart and J.C.
Penney, each of which has struggled as Wal-Mart has expanded. Wal-Mart's
annual tax payment has been above $7 billion in each of its past five
fiscal years. Wal-Mart's size has become something of a disadvantage
because it is hard for the retailer to grow much faster than the economy
in general. Recently, the company's U.S. same-store sales were up only
2.2% In a recent conversation with the media, Charles Holley Jr.,
Wal-Mart's chief financial officer, said "I don't think the economy's
helping us."
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 4:41:03 PM UTC-6, John Kuthe wrote:
On Sun, 01 Nov 2015 17:33:48 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

Walmart sells their products under the Stouffer's name, superb!
http://www.stuffed-foods.com/
Tonight's dinner is Spinach, Kale, & Mozz Ravioli with pork shoulder
chop tomato sauce that I made a while ago.


I would rather starve than eat anything from a MalWart!!

No, you wouldn't. Maybe you'd go a day or two, but that's just a fast,
not starvation. After a few days you'd be crying like a little Somali
boy, and begging like Esau for just a few slices of Great Value bacon.

John Kuthe...


--Bryan


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