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Old 26-11-2013, 02:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Breadmaker Capacity and Scaling Recipes

I have a Hitachi HB-D102 that's about 20 years old. It bakes a vertical loaf so I rarely use it and when I do, it's only to mix the dough. The recipes that came with the machine all use 3 cups of flour.

I have a recipe for challah that calls for 6 - 6 1/2 cups of flour and 3 eggs. "Makes 2 large challot, about 1 2/3 pounds each." First of all, I'd like to know how much flour can this machine likely mix without burning out the motor. Hitachi no longer offers support for this line so I Googled "HB-D102 motor" and found that it is supposedly 90W.

But this recipe is really larger than I need. Since it calls for 3 eggs, is it appropriate to multiply ALL solid and liquid ingredients including yeast by 2/3? In other words, except for eggs, do baking recipes scale linearly?

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Old 26-11-2013, 05:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Breadmaker Capacity and Scaling Recipes

I have the same Hitachi I think - circa 1990 - and I wouldn't dare put more that 3 cups of flour in it. I've seen dough rise almost to the lid of the machine.

Why not just make two batches of dough, refridge one til the other's ready, or maybe just let it sit in an oiled bowl with a towel cover in a draft free locale.



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Old 26-11-2013, 05:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Breadmaker Capacity and Scaling Recipes


"Kalmia" wrote in message
...
I have the same Hitachi I think - circa 1990 - and I wouldn't dare put more
that 3 cups of flour in it. I've seen dough rise almost to the lid of the
machine.

Why not just make two batches of dough, refridge one til the other's
ready, or maybe just let it sit in an oiled bowl with a towel cover in a
draft free locale.


doesn't the break maker "make the dough" after you toss in all the
ingredients?


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Old 26-11-2013, 10:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Breadmaker Capacity and Scaling Recipes

On Tue, 26 Nov 2013 21:54:27 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:


On 26-Nov-2013, wrote:

I have a Hitachi HB-D102 that's about 20 years old. It bakes a
vertical loaf so I rarely use it and when I do, it's only to mix the
dough. The recipes that came with the machine all use 3 cups of
flour.

I have a recipe for challah that calls for 6 - 6 1/2 cups of flour and
3 eggs. "Makes 2 large challot, about 1 2/3 pounds each." First of
all, I'd like to know how much flour can this machine likely mix
without burning out the motor. Hitachi no longer offers support for
this line so I Googled "HB-D102 motor" and found that it is supposedly
90W.

But this recipe is really larger than I need. Since it calls for 3
eggs, is it appropriate to multiply ALL solid and liquid ingredients
including yeast by 2/3? In other words, except for eggs, do baking
recipes scale linearly?


I have a 3 cup Breadman; not the same brand but same era. I would not
exceed 3-4 cups of flour. Since you indicate you don't need the full
amount of challah, if it were me, I'd halve the recipe. Use two eggs
and reduce the water by 2 tablespoons to compensate for the extra
half-egg. I usually watch the dough ball and check it for proper
consistency (round and smooth, tacky like a Post-It note), adding water
or flour until the ball looks and feels right.


If you have to stand by and futz with additions that negates the "A"
in ABM. There's no law that says you need to fill the machine to full
capacity. Since baking is not pharmaceutical precise chemistry (flour
and yeast are never exactly the same each batch) sometimes it's best
to bake a 7/8 loaf.


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Old 26-11-2013, 11:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Breadmaker Capacity and Scaling Recipes

On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 11:27:30 AM UTC-6, Kalmia wrote:
I have the same Hitachi I think - circa 1990 - and I wouldn't dare put more that 3 cups of flour in it. I've seen dough rise almost to the lid of the machine.



Why not just make two batches of dough, refridge one til the other's ready, or maybe just let it sit in an oiled bowl with a towel cover in a draft free locale.


Kalmia,
I only need enough space in the bread pan to mix the ingredients (assuming the motor can handle the load). I use another, larger bowl to let the dough rise.

I'm intrigued by your suggestion to make two batches, refrigerating the first one till both are ready. A few years ago, I called Fleischmann's about the life of "BreadMachine" yeast and I believe was told that it's only good for 4 1/2 hours. Your comment makes me wonder if I should be using a different type of yeast.


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