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Old 30-12-2012, 11:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

Coq au vin rouge is one of the world's most famous dishes and, as far as
I am concerned, also one of the most overrated. It is incomparably
better made with (and accompanied by) white wine. I posted an Alsatian
version of coq au Riesling before; this one is made with chardonnay and
is very nice indeed, too. Instead of a jointed whole chicken I used
chicken legs and thighs; instead of butter flavoured with Oregon black
truffles I used Italian-produced butter flavoured with summer truffles;
instead of pearl onions I used small shallots, peeled but not blanched.

Victor

Pairings: Coq au Vin Blanc
By FLORENCE FABRICANT

Just as Oregon borrows from Burgundy in vineyards planted with pinot
noirs and chardonnays, that region also inspires dinner. The iconic
boeuf bourguignon would not be the best choice with chardonnay, but this
version of coq au vin, replacing Chambertin with chardonnay, couldn't be
better. I went light with it, omitting the bacon lardons. And I gave a
nod to Oregon's truffle crop by finishing the sauce with a gloss of
black truffle butter. It's a modest investment that elevates the dish.
A generous slab of unsalted butter (especially if it's high-fat
European-style) could also bolster the sauce, though with less foxy
intrigue.

Coq au Vin Blanc
Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

1 tablespoon grape-seed oil
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, in 10 pieces without backbone, dried
Salt and ground white pepper
8 ounces white pearl onions, blanched 3 minutes and peeled
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
4 cloves garlic, sliced
9 ounces oyster mushrooms, trimmed, clumps separated
3/4 cup chardonnay
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter (unsalted or black truffle)
1 tablespoon minced tarragon

1. Heat the oil on medium-high in a 4-quart stovetop casserole or sautÚ
pan. Add the chicken, skin side down, as many pieces as fit
comfortably. Cook until lightly browned, season with salt and pepper
and turn to brown other side. Remove to a platter when done and repeat
with the remaining chicken.

2. Add the pearl onions to casserole and toss in fat until lightly
browned. Remove to a dish. Reduce heat to low. Add the chopped onion,
celery and garlic, cook until softened, and stir in the mushrooms. When
they wilt, add the wine, bring to a simmer and season with salt, pepper
and lemon juice. Return chicken to casserole with any accumulated
juices, baste, cover and cook 30 minutes, basting a few more times.
Remove the chicken to a platter.

3. Increase heat to medium-high and cook the sauce and mushrooms about
5 minutes, until sauce thickens slightly. Lower heat, add the pearl
onions and butter. When butter melts, check seasonings, return chicken
to casserole, baste and simmer a few minutes. Serve from casserole or
transfer to a deep platter. Scatter the tarragon on top before serving.

Yield: 4 servings.

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Old 31-12-2012, 06:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 00:06:53 +0100, (Victor Sack)
wrote:

I gave a
nod to Oregon's truffle crop by finishing the sauce with a gloss of
black truffle butter. It's a modest investment that elevates the dish.
A generous slab of unsalted butter (especially if it's high-fat
European-style) could also bolster the sauce, though with less foxy
intrigue.

Coq au Vin Blanc
Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

1 tablespoon grape-seed oil
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, in 10 pieces without backbone, dried
Salt and ground white pepper
8 ounces white pearl onions, blanched 3 minutes and peeled
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
4 cloves garlic, sliced
9 ounces oyster mushrooms, trimmed, clumps separated
3/4 cup chardonnay
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter (unsalted or black truffle)
1 tablespoon minced tarragon

1. Heat the oil on medium-high in a 4-quart stovetop casserole or sautÚ
pan. Add the chicken, skin side down, as many pieces as fit
comfortably. Cook until lightly browned, season with salt and pepper
and turn to brown other side. Remove to a platter when done and repeat
with the remaining chicken.

2. Add the pearl onions to casserole and toss in fat until lightly
browned. Remove to a dish. Reduce heat to low. Add the chopped onion,
celery and garlic, cook until softened, and stir in the mushrooms. When
they wilt, add the wine, bring to a simmer and season with salt, pepper
and lemon juice. Return chicken to casserole with any accumulated
juices, baste, cover and cook 30 minutes, basting a few more times.
Remove the chicken to a platter.

3. Increase heat to medium-high and cook the sauce and mushrooms about
5 minutes, until sauce thickens slightly. Lower heat, add the pearl
onions and butter. When butter melts, check seasonings, return chicken
to casserole, baste and simmer a few minutes. Serve from casserole or
transfer to a deep platter. Scatter the tarragon on top before serving.

Yield: 4 servings.


Thanks, that looks good enough to give a try and I just happen to have
some of that truffle butter on hand. Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.



--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 31-12-2012, 07:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Sun, 30 Dec 2012 22:52:24 -0800, sf wrote:

Thanks, that looks good enough to give a try and I just happen to have
some of that truffle butter on hand. Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


Great with poultry and fish. One of my 'staple' herbs. I always add it
to a roast chook, along with half a lemon.
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Old 31-12-2012, 07:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default REC: Coq au Vin Blanc


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 00:06:53 +0100, (Victor Sack)
wrote:

I gave a
nod to Oregon's truffle crop by finishing the sauce with a gloss of
black truffle butter. It's a modest investment that elevates the dish.
A generous slab of unsalted butter (especially if it's high-fat
European-style) could also bolster the sauce, though with less foxy
intrigue.

Coq au Vin Blanc
Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

1 tablespoon grape-seed oil
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, in 10 pieces without backbone, dried
Salt and ground white pepper
8 ounces white pearl onions, blanched 3 minutes and peeled
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
4 cloves garlic, sliced
9 ounces oyster mushrooms, trimmed, clumps separated
3/4 cup chardonnay
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter (unsalted or black truffle)
1 tablespoon minced tarragon

1. Heat the oil on medium-high in a 4-quart stovetop casserole or sautÚ
pan. Add the chicken, skin side down, as many pieces as fit
comfortably. Cook until lightly browned, season with salt and pepper
and turn to brown other side. Remove to a platter when done and repeat
with the remaining chicken.

2. Add the pearl onions to casserole and toss in fat until lightly
browned. Remove to a dish. Reduce heat to low. Add the chopped onion,
celery and garlic, cook until softened, and stir in the mushrooms. When
they wilt, add the wine, bring to a simmer and season with salt, pepper
and lemon juice. Return chicken to casserole with any accumulated
juices, baste, cover and cook 30 minutes, basting a few more times.
Remove the chicken to a platter.

3. Increase heat to medium-high and cook the sauce and mushrooms about
5 minutes, until sauce thickens slightly. Lower heat, add the pearl
onions and butter. When butter melts, check seasonings, return chicken
to casserole, baste and simmer a few minutes. Serve from casserole or
transfer to a deep platter. Scatter the tarragon on top before serving.

Yield: 4 servings.


Thanks, that looks good enough to give a try and I just happen to have
some of that truffle butter on hand. Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.



--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.



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Old 31-12-2012, 07:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 46,524
Default REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

sf wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 00:06:53 +0100, (Victor Sack)
wrote:

I gave a
nod to Oregon's truffle crop by finishing the sauce with a gloss of
black truffle butter. It's a modest investment that elevates the
dish. A generous slab of unsalted butter (especially if it's high-fat
European-style) could also bolster the sauce, though with less foxy
intrigue.

Coq au Vin Blanc
Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

1 tablespoon grape-seed oil
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, in 10 pieces without backbone, dried
Salt and ground white pepper
8 ounces white pearl onions, blanched 3 minutes and peeled
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
4 cloves garlic, sliced
9 ounces oyster mushrooms, trimmed, clumps separated
3/4 cup chardonnay
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons butter (unsalted or black truffle)
1 tablespoon minced tarragon

1. Heat the oil on medium-high in a 4-quart stovetop casserole or
sautÚ pan. Add the chicken, skin side down, as many pieces as fit
comfortably. Cook until lightly browned, season with salt and pepper
and turn to brown other side. Remove to a platter when done and
repeat with the remaining chicken.

2. Add the pearl onions to casserole and toss in fat until lightly
browned. Remove to a dish. Reduce heat to low. Add the chopped
onion, celery and garlic, cook until softened, and stir in the
mushrooms. When they wilt, add the wine, bring to a simmer and
season with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Return chicken to
casserole with any accumulated juices, baste, cover and cook 30
minutes, basting a few more times. Remove the chicken to a platter.

3. Increase heat to medium-high and cook the sauce and mushrooms
about 5 minutes, until sauce thickens slightly. Lower heat, add the
pearl onions and butter. When butter melts, check seasonings,
return chicken to casserole, baste and simmer a few minutes. Serve
from casserole or transfer to a deep platter. Scatter the tarragon
on top before serving.

Yield: 4 servings.


Thanks, that looks good enough to give a try and I just happen to have
some of that truffle butter on hand. Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.



I like buying dried spices and herbs at Target because they carry a variety
of sizes. I can get small bottles of things I don't use much of. Some of
the grocery stores here also have small jars but not all.




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Old 31-12-2012, 08:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sky Sky is offline
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.

Sky

--

Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!


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Old 31-12-2012, 08:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.


I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.
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Old 31-12-2012, 11:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

"Je▀us" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.


I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.


But it should be divided aobut every 3 years to keep it vigourous. I love
tarragon - one of those swoon worthy herbs.


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Old 31-12-2012, 02:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.

How much water does it get? It won't get watered if it doesn't fall
from the sky and IMO, if mint survives in your yard - it's either
because of rain or you're watering it.


--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 31-12-2012, 02:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 19:15:13 +1100, Je▀us wrote:

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.


If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.


I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.


Frost isn't the issue here.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


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Old 31-12-2012, 08:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 22:49:34 +1100, "Farm1"
wrote:

"Je▀us" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.

If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.


I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.


But it should be divided aobut every 3 years to keep it vigourous. I love
tarragon - one of those swoon worthy herbs.


That's something I should do... will do today.
Thanks
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Old 01-01-2013, 04:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

"Je▀us" wrote in message
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 22:49:34 +1100, "Farm1"
wrote:

"Je▀us" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.

If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.

I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.


But it should be divided aobut every 3 years to keep it vigourous. I love
tarragon - one of those swoon worthy herbs.


That's something I should do... will do today.
Thanks


Yikes! I didn't mean for that advice to be taken literally for action at
this time of the year. I'm done for by the garden heat by midday so imagine
how a transplanted herb may react.

If you are going to do it today however, check how the temps are going to go
over the next few days. And try to give it some shade for a few days so it
can settle in and water well too till it gets its roots established. I cut
bits of Sacred Bamboo (nandina domestica) and use that as shade unbrellas to
protect transplants - works a treat and the only real reason why it's worth
growing as far as I'm concerned.


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Old 03-01-2013, 02:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Tue, 1 Jan 2013 15:06:28 +1100, "Farm1"
wrote:

"Je▀us" wrote in message
On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 22:49:34 +1100, "Farm1"
wrote:

"Je▀us" wrote in message
news On Mon, 31 Dec 2012 03:05:16 -0500, Sky
wrote:

On 12/31/2012 1:52 AM, sf wrote:
Tarragon is another matter,
fresh or dried. Not that I don't like tarragon, but I am not French
and don't have enough uses for it to replace the stale bottle of dried
tarragon that I finally threw out, but this recipe looks good enough
that I'll buy tarragon.... not sure what form it will be in yet, but I
can always freeze "fresh" tarragon.

If rosemary grows and survives in your neck of the woods, then tarragon
should survive, too! Heck, the tarragon plant planted in my front
yard some years ago still survives to this day - dang, but it's
resilient : Er, as does the mint patch, too.

I would venture to say its tougher than Rosemary. We have severe
frosts here and I've lost many Rosemary bushes... the Tarragon always
dies back in winter but come springtime, it always regrows.

But it should be divided aobut every 3 years to keep it vigourous. I love
tarragon - one of those swoon worthy herbs.


That's something I should do... will do today.
Thanks


Yikes! I didn't mean for that advice to be taken literally for action at
this time of the year. I'm done for by the garden heat by midday so imagine
how a transplanted herb may react.

If you are going to do it today however, check how the temps are going to go
over the next few days. And try to give it some shade for a few days so it
can settle in and water well too till it gets its roots established. I cut
bits of Sacred Bamboo (nandina domestica) and use that as shade unbrellas to
protect transplants - works a treat and the only real reason why it's worth
growing as far as I'm concerned.


Not to worry, I didn't get around to doing it

The weather here isn't that brutally hot, if fact I was wearing a
beanie when out doing the rounds this morning.

Actually, it has hit 31░C today - the hottest we've had this summer -
but still quite cool inside the house and the shade houses, I reckon
the tarragon would handle it okay.
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Old 03-01-2013, 05:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

"Je▀us" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 1 Jan 2013 15:06:28 +1100, "Farm1"
wrote:
Yikes! I didn't mean for that advice to be taken literally for action at
this time of the year. I'm done for by the garden heat by midday so
imagine
how a transplanted herb may react.

If you are going to do it today however, check how the temps are going to
go
over the next few days. And try to give it some shade for a few days so
it
can settle in and water well too till it gets its roots established. I
cut
bits of Sacred Bamboo (nandina domestica) and use that as shade unbrellas
to
protect transplants - works a treat and the only real reason why it's
worth
growing as far as I'm concerned.


Not to worry, I didn't get around to doing it


LOL. Well that's a relief! I was worried about your poor gaggin tarragon
gaspign for water in a blazing sun.

The weather here isn't that brutally hot, if fact I was wearing a
beanie when out doing the rounds this morning.


Send some this way please!

Actually, it has hit 31░C today - the hottest we've had this summer -
but still quite cool inside the house and the shade houses, I reckon
the tarragon would handle it okay.


Probably. BTW, I found a Brown Snake in my plastic Geyde bin the other day.
It was a shock for both of us as you can imagine :-))


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Old 03-01-2013, 07:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default tarragon; was REC: Coq au Vin Blanc

On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 13:32:20 +1100, Je▀us wrote:

Actually, it has hit 31░C today - the hottest we've had this summer -
but still quite cool inside the house and the shade houses, I reckon
the tarragon would handle it okay.


How cold does it get there? I tried to buy Tarragon at the nursery
today and was out of luck. They told me they don't sell it this time
of year and the person I talked to said hers doesn't like it in San
Francisco. She says her French Tarragon is 3 years old, grows just a
few inches during the growing season and then dies back. Do you find
that tarragon is deciduous? She says it dies back to the ground every
year.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


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