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Old 03-11-2003, 03:01 AM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

We discovered a small farm nearby that makes artisanal cheese from
their own dairy herd and bakes wonderful bread in a brick oven (for
those of you who are familiar with such ovens, this one is by Alan
Scott of Ovencrafters).

The farm offers demos/classes and on this beautiful Indian Summer day
we drove off into the country to check it all out. (moon roof open)

We got to watch (and taste along the way) the cheese making, from the
fresh milk going into the vat (yes, we met the cows) to the curds
being put into molds, were given a wonderful demonstration & talk
about the entire process and were mightily entertained by the
wonderful stories told by the owner, Jonathan White.

The second part of the morning was spent near the wood-fired oven
making rye levain epis and some foccacia and with a bit of the aged
cheeses, making mozzarella from the curds we had watched being
created in the morning and, of course, tasting our way through it all.

The farm was lovely, with children (the oldest daughter, 15, sells
eggs from the absolutely free-range chickens that wandered all over)
around, cats & dogs lounging about and a charming herd of cows
(several varieties) lending their lowing in the background.

All in all, we had a wonderful day spent pursuing my favorite hobby
(that being anything to do with food) and came home with some terrific
breads & cheeses.

I cannot recall how I stumbled on the web page for this place (it is
in northern Sussex county of New Jersey, near the NY state border,)
but heartily recommend a trip out for anyone who is in the area. (it
is about 90 minutes from Manhattan). The only flaw in the day was when
we locked the keys in the car, but we were rescued by AAA)

If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron

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Old 03-11-2003, 04:27 AM
Dick Margulis
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

Boron Elgar wrote:
We discovered a small farm nearby that makes artisanal cheese from
their own dairy herd and bakes wonderful bread in a brick oven (for
those of you who are familiar with such ovens, this one is by Alan
Scott of Ovencrafters).

The farm offers demos/classes and on this beautiful Indian Summer day
we drove off into the country to check it all out. (moon roof open)

We got to watch (and taste along the way) the cheese making, from the
fresh milk going into the vat (yes, we met the cows) to the curds
being put into molds, were given a wonderful demonstration & talk
about the entire process and were mightily entertained by the
wonderful stories told by the owner, Jonathan White.

The second part of the morning was spent near the wood-fired oven
making rye levain epis and some foccacia and with a bit of the aged
cheeses, making mozzarella from the curds we had watched being
created in the morning and, of course, tasting our way through it all.

The farm was lovely, with children (the oldest daughter, 15, sells
eggs from the absolutely free-range chickens that wandered all over)
around, cats & dogs lounging about and a charming herd of cows
(several varieties) lending their lowing in the background.

All in all, we had a wonderful day spent pursuing my favorite hobby
(that being anything to do with food) and came home with some terrific
breads & cheeses.

I cannot recall how I stumbled on the web page for this place (it is
in northern Sussex county of New Jersey, near the NY state border,)
but heartily recommend a trip out for anyone who is in the area. (it
is about 90 minutes from Manhattan). The only flaw in the day was when
we locked the keys in the car, but we were rescued by AAA)

If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron



That sounds like a wonderful resource, especially for urban/suburban
types who think milk comes from cartons!

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Old 03-11-2003, 05:06 AM
alzelt
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm



Dick Margulis wrote:



That sounds like a wonderful resource, especially for urban/suburban
types who think milk comes from cartons!


I remember my daughter telling me that you pull the cows gutters and
pick up the milk at Safeway. In retrospect, she is probably closer to
the truth than many kids today.
--
Alan

"If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and
avoid the people, you might better stay home."
--James Michener

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Old 03-11-2003, 03:57 PM
Bob Pastorio
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

Boron Elgar wrote:

We discovered a small farm nearby that makes artisanal cheese from
their own dairy herd and bakes wonderful bread in a brick oven (for
those of you who are familiar with such ovens, this one is by Alan
Scott of Ovencrafters).

The farm offers demos/classes and on this beautiful Indian Summer day
we drove off into the country to check it all out. (moon roof open)

We got to watch (and taste along the way) the cheese making, from the
fresh milk going into the vat (yes, we met the cows) to the curds
being put into molds, were given a wonderful demonstration & talk
about the entire process and were mightily entertained by the
wonderful stories told by the owner, Jonathan White.


Jonathan was a partner of Charlie Trotter in another cheesemaking
operation a few years back. Amazing products, like the best of the
cheeses I've had around the world. Many wild-ripened cheeses and
several US-legal raw-milk cheeses.

He was involved in a very cool program a couple years back where he
went to Tibet and taught nomadic yak herders how to make cheese from
the milk. The resulting cheese was a very pale green and had an, er,
"interesting" taste. Everybody I gave some to said how much it was,
um, interesting. They all said they, uh, might eat more at some future
date because it was, uhm, interesting.

Jonathan brought some of his cheeses to an exposition in Europe and
got astonished praise from the attendees.

Pastorio

The second part of the morning was spent near the wood-fired oven
making rye levain epis and some foccacia and with a bit of the aged
cheeses, making mozzarella from the curds we had watched being
created in the morning and, of course, tasting our way through it all.

The farm was lovely, with children (the oldest daughter, 15, sells
eggs from the absolutely free-range chickens that wandered all over)
around, cats & dogs lounging about and a charming herd of cows
(several varieties) lending their lowing in the background.

All in all, we had a wonderful day spent pursuing my favorite hobby
(that being anything to do with food) and came home with some terrific
breads & cheeses.

I cannot recall how I stumbled on the web page for this place (it is
in northern Sussex county of New Jersey, near the NY state border,)
but heartily recommend a trip out for anyone who is in the area. (it
is about 90 minutes from Manhattan). The only flaw in the day was when
we locked the keys in the car, but we were rescued by AAA)

If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron


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Old 03-11-2003, 04:28 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 09:57:17 -0500, Bob Pastorio
wrote:

Boron Elgar wrote:


We got to watch (and taste along the way) the cheese making, from the
fresh milk going into the vat (yes, we met the cows) to the curds
being put into molds, were given a wonderful demonstration & talk
about the entire process and were mightily entertained by the
wonderful stories told by the owner, Jonathan White.


Jonathan was a partner of Charlie Trotter in another cheesemaking
operation a few years back. Amazing products, like the best of the
cheeses I've had around the world. Many wild-ripened cheeses and
several US-legal raw-milk cheeses.

He was involved in a very cool program a couple years back where he
went to Tibet and taught nomadic yak herders how to make cheese from
the milk. The resulting cheese was a very pale green and had an, er,
"interesting" taste. Everybody I gave some to said how much it was,
um, interesting. They all said they, uh, might eat more at some future
date because it was, uhm, interesting.

Jonathan brought some of his cheeses to an exposition in Europe and
got astonished praise from the attendees.



With great modesty, he told us of these delightful happenings (didn't
mention Charlie Trotter, though) and I was suitably impressed that
someone with such talent & expertise was within a 40 minute drive of
my house.

They seem to all be raw milk cheeses now and each has a wonderful
flavor. There were a few of his specialties that were not available
yesterday & I will take a few trips up there in over the next months
in hopes of trying more.

Oh...and he was kind enough to give me a vial of his starter. I was
jazzed and guard it well. We had some nice chats about different
flours, too.

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron




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Old 03-11-2003, 04:43 PM
barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Barry
"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 09:57:17 -0500, Bob Pastorio
wrote:

Boron Elgar wrote:


We got to watch (and taste along the way) the cheese making, from the
fresh milk going into the vat (yes, we met the cows) to the curds
being put into molds, were given a wonderful demonstration & talk
about the entire process and were mightily entertained by the
wonderful stories told by the owner, Jonathan White.


Jonathan was a partner of Charlie Trotter in another cheesemaking
operation a few years back. Amazing products, like the best of the
cheeses I've had around the world. Many wild-ripened cheeses and
several US-legal raw-milk cheeses.

He was involved in a very cool program a couple years back where he
went to Tibet and taught nomadic yak herders how to make cheese from
the milk. The resulting cheese was a very pale green and had an, er,
"interesting" taste. Everybody I gave some to said how much it was,
um, interesting. They all said they, uh, might eat more at some future
date because it was, uhm, interesting.

Jonathan brought some of his cheeses to an exposition in Europe and
got astonished praise from the attendees.



With great modesty, he told us of these delightful happenings (didn't
mention Charlie Trotter, though) and I was suitably impressed that
someone with such talent & expertise was within a 40 minute drive of
my house.

They seem to all be raw milk cheeses now and each has a wonderful
flavor. There were a few of his specialties that were not available
yesterday & I will take a few trips up there in over the next months
in hopes of trying more.

Oh...and he was kind enough to give me a vial of his starter. I was
jazzed and guard it well. We had some nice chats about different
flours, too.

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron




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Old 03-11-2003, 05:37 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 15:43:42 GMT, "barry"
wrote:

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron



Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Thank you for that mention. I have visited that site. Though the
supplies are readily available on line, one important ingredient never
is... fresh milk. The best cheeses come from it. Here in NJ, it is
illegal to sell any raw milk so one cannot even go to a dairy farmer &
purchase directly.

Boron
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Old 03-11-2003, 06:35 PM
maxine in ri
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm


I cannot recall how I stumbled on the web page for this place (it is
in northern Sussex county of New Jersey, near the NY state border,)
but heartily recommend a trip out for anyone who is in the area. (it
is about 90 minutes from Manhattan). The only flaw in the day was when
we locked the keys in the car, but we were rescued by AAA)

If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron


Kewl! It's not that far from my BIL's. I'll have to contact them
and see when during the Yule season they're open, so we can check it out.

maxine in ri
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Old 03-11-2003, 06:38 PM
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 22:27:52 -0500, Dick Margulis
wrote:

If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron



That sounds like a wonderful resource, especially for urban/suburban
types who think milk comes from cartons!


They came to the Union Square Greenmarket (NYC) this morning and I
bought pieces of the three cheeses they brought in. We now have four
artisanal cheesemakers coming in through a week. 2 with cows, and one
each sheep and goats.



Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

"Religious wisdom is to wisdom as military music is to music."
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2003, 06:59 PM
Margaret Suran
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

Boron Elgar wrote:

On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 15:43:42 GMT, "barry"
wrote:

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron



Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Thank you for that mention. I have visited that site. Though the
supplies are readily available on line, one important ingredient never
is... fresh milk. The best cheeses come from it. Here in NJ, it is
illegal to sell any raw milk so one cannot even go to a dairy farmer &
purchase directly.

Boron


Thank you for the lovely story of A Day On The Farm. From your
description, I almost felt as if I had come along with you, seeing all
the animals that were wandering around, tasting the cheeses and smelling
the aroma of the baking bread.

Thank you for sharing this pleasant day with us, Margaret


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Old 03-11-2003, 07:00 PM
Steve Calvin
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:

On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 22:27:52 -0500, Dick Margulis
wrote:


If anyone wants to see pictures of the place (including the oven!),
just click below:

http://www.cowsoutside.com

Boron



I may have to check that out. It's only about an hour from me.

Did you take one of the seminars or just go to a tasting?

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Old 03-11-2003, 07:25 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 12:59:03 -0500, Margaret Suran
wrote:


Thank you for the lovely story of A Day On The Farm. From your
description, I almost felt as if I had come along with you, seeing all
the animals that were wandering around, tasting the cheeses and smelling
the aroma of the baking bread.

Thank you for sharing this pleasant day with us, Margaret


Aw, shucks, Margaret...you make me blush.

Boron

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Old 03-11-2003, 08:35 PM
Jack Schidt®
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 15:43:42 GMT, "barry"
wrote:

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron



Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Thank you for that mention. I have visited that site. Though the
supplies are readily available on line, one important ingredient never
is... fresh milk. The best cheeses come from it. Here in NJ, it is
illegal to sell any raw milk so one cannot even go to a dairy farmer &
purchase directly.

Boron


Great narrative about the farm and the cheeses sound great.

I'm puzzled by this. Upon perusing their website, one finds that one of
their children is autistic. Then Greg Z posts his farm story that also
features an autistic child. From out of the blue we get 2 farm stories and
they both feature autism. Coincidence? I think not.

Jack Conspiracy


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Old 03-11-2003, 08:59 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm

On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 19:35:49 GMT, "Jack Schidt®"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
.. .
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 15:43:42 GMT, "barry"
wrote:

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron



Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Thank you for that mention. I have visited that site. Though the
supplies are readily available on line, one important ingredient never
is... fresh milk. The best cheeses come from it. Here in NJ, it is
illegal to sell any raw milk so one cannot even go to a dairy farmer &
purchase directly.

Boron


Great narrative about the farm and the cheeses sound great.

I'm puzzled by this. Upon perusing their website, one finds that one of
their children is autistic. Then Greg Z posts his farm story that also
features an autistic child. From out of the blue we get 2 farm stories and
they both feature autism. Coincidence? I think not.

Jack Conspiracy


I blame Clinton.

Boron
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2003, 09:55 PM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default A day on the farm


"Jack Schidt®" wrote in message
news

"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 15:43:42 GMT, "barry"
wrote:

I must say, that I went up there primarily for the bread aspects of

it
all, but was quite taken with the cheese part and only wish that
making decent cheese at home were as easy as making decent bread.

Boron



Check this site and the people behind it.

www.cheesemaking.com

Thank you for that mention. I have visited that site. Though the
supplies are readily available on line, one important ingredient never
is... fresh milk. The best cheeses come from it. Here in NJ, it is
illegal to sell any raw milk so one cannot even go to a dairy farmer &
purchase directly.

Boron


Great narrative about the farm and the cheeses sound great.

I'm puzzled by this. Upon perusing their website, one finds that one of
their children is autistic. Then Greg Z posts his farm story that also
features an autistic child. From out of the blue we get 2 farm stories

and
they both feature autism. Coincidence? I think not.

Jack Conspiracy

There are no such things as conspiracies! Of course, they would want us to
believe that, wouldn't they?

Graham




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