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Old 23-04-2009, 07:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Substituting artificial butter for real butter or shortening

This is an extension of the above question.
Can you substitute artificial butter for either butter or shortening?
Can you use artificial butter for sautéing or frying successfully?
I've never tried doing that. As with butter, I think the artificial butter
is part water.

Ed




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Old 23-04-2009, 07:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Substituting artificial butter for real butter or shortening

Theron wrote:

This is an extension of the above question.
Can you substitute artificial butter for either butter or shortening?
Can you use artificial butter for sautéing or frying successfully?
I've never tried doing that. As with butter, I think the artificial butter
is part water.


Generally you can substitute margarine for butter as long as you
make sure you're using genuine margarine as it is guaranteed to be
at least 80% fat. Anything not labeled margarine is less thn 80%.
When substituting for shortening, you may use 15% more to make up
for the water in the shortening, and try to use slightly less
moisture elsewhere in the recipe.

-sw
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Old 23-04-2009, 07:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Substituting artificial butter for real butter or shortening

"Theron" wrote in message
...
This is an extension of the above question.
Can you substitute artificial butter for either butter or shortening?


NO - check the water content - too high-


Can you use artificial butter for sautéing or frying successfully?


No too much water - Note these are called SPREAD(s)

I've never tried doing that.


As with butter, I think the artificial butter is part water.

Real American butter is a very small percentage water.


Ed


Made by churning cream until it reaches a semisolid state, butter must by
U.S. Law be at least 80 percent milk fat. The remaining 20 percent consists
of water and milk solids. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grades
butter quality based on flavor, body, texture, color and salt. Butter
packages bear a shield surrounding the letter grade (and occasionally the
numerical score equivalent) indicating the quality of the contents. The
grades, beginning with the finest, are AA (93 score), A (92 score), B (90
score) and C (89 score). AA and A grades are those most commonly found at
the retail level. Butter may be artificially colored (with natural annatto);
it may also be salted or unsalted. Unsalted butter is usually labeled as
such and contains absolutely no salt. It's sometimes erroneously referred to
as "sweet" butter-a misnomer because any butter made with sweet instead of
sour cream is sweet butter. Therefore, expect packages labeled "sweet cream
butter" to contain salted butter. Unsalted butter is preferred by many for
everyday eating and baking. Because it contains no salt (which acts as a
preservative), it is more perishable than salted butter and therefore stored
in the freezer section of some markets. Whipped butter has had air beaten
into it, thereby increasing volume and creating a softer, more spreadable
consistency when cold. It comes in salted and unsalted forms. Light or
reduced-calorie butter has about half the fat of regular butter, possible
through the addition of water, skim milk and gelatin. It shouldn't be
substituted for regular butter or margarine in frying and baking. Storing
butter: Because butter absorbs flavors like a sponge, it should be wrapped
airtight for storage. Refrigerate regular butter for up to 1 month, unsalted
butter for up to 2 weeks. Both can be frozen for up to 6 months. See also
bercy (butter); beurre blanc; beurre manié; beurre noir; beurre noisette;
butter substitutes; clarified butter; compound butter; fats and oils; garlic
butter; ghee.

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Old 23-04-2009, 08:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Substituting artificial butter for real butter or shortening

Dimitri wrote:

"Theron" wrote in message
...
This is an extension of the above question.
Can you substitute artificial butter for either butter or shortening?


NO - check the water content - too high-


It's not the water content that matters, it's the fat content. True
margarine, by law, must be 80% fat. Same as butter.

So yes - they can be substituted just fine. Even Parkay at 70% fat
last I looked can be used as a substitute for butter. But anything
less than that, probably not.

-sw


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