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Old 18-09-2007, 03:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Old 18-09-2007, 03:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Janet B." wrote

http://www.abrfaq.info/


So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.

nancy


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Old 18-09-2007, 04:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Nancy Young" wrote in message
. ..

"Janet B." wrote

http://www.abrfaq.info/


So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.

nancy

Nancy
It can be as difficult as you want to make it. There are plenty of rye
recipes that use enough white flour to overcome the stickiness of the rye --
they are easy to make. There are rye recipes that use yeast to make them
rise and they are easy. The purists insist on making a 'sour' first and
using that to rise the bread. That's a little more difficult, although it
depends upon the recipe. Then there are those that do the real pumpernickle
that cooks for a long, long time at a low temperature and that's a toughie.
There is everything in between. Rye flour doesn't behave the way that white
flour does. It's sticky, it isn't elastic and it doesn't rise as high. For
a first effort, try a recipe that has a lot of white flour in relationship
with rye flour. Try to avoid the recipes that have you use coffee,
chocolate, etc., they are there for color and are not needed for rye flavor.
Bread cookbooks are a good source of good recipes and information. Ask some
questions at alt.bread.recipes. Everyone there will be happy to help. KA
will be another good place to start. Ask them for some first steps help.
They can give you everything from rye bread in a bottle flavoring to all the
basic flour needed to do it from scratch. I believe their rye flour comes
with a recipe or maybe it is the first clear flour that comes with a rye
recipe. I envy you being able to go to the store and shop. Although, maybe
not, my purse couldn't stand the traffic. I haven't baked any bread since
early 2005 as I haven't been well. I'm planning on getting back into it in
a month or so and am currently stocking up on all the different flour and
making my list for KA. Have fun!!!
Janet


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Old 18-09-2007, 04:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default alt.bread.recipes faq has moved


"Janet B." wrote

"Nancy Young" wrote


"Janet B." wrote

http://www.abrfaq.info/


So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.


It can be as difficult as you want to make it. There are plenty of rye
recipes that use enough white flour to overcome the stickiness of the
rye -- they are easy to make. There are rye recipes that use yeast to
make them rise and they are easy. The purists insist on making a 'sour'
first and using that to rise the bread. That's a little more difficult,
although it depends upon the recipe. Then there are those that do the
real pumpernickle that cooks for a long, long time at a low temperature
and that's a toughie. There is everything in between. Rye flour doesn't
behave the way that white flour does. It's sticky, it isn't elastic and
it doesn't rise as high. For a first effort, try a recipe that has a lot
of white flour in relationship with rye flour. Try to avoid the recipes
that have you use coffee, chocolate, etc., they are there for color and
are not needed for rye flavor. Bread cookbooks are a good source of good
recipes and information. Ask some questions at alt.bread.recipes.
Everyone there will be happy to help. KA will be another good place to
start. Ask them for some first steps help. They can give you everything
from rye bread in a bottle flavoring to all the basic flour needed to do
it from scratch. I believe their rye flour comes with a recipe or maybe
it is the first clear flour that comes with a rye recipe. I envy you
being able to go to the store and shop. Although, maybe not, my purse
couldn't stand the traffic. I haven't baked any bread since early 2005 as
I haven't been well. I'm planning on getting back into it in a month or
so and am currently stocking up on all the different flour and making my
list for KA. Have fun!!!


Thank you so much for this note, I've printed it for future reference.
I was going to buy some additive while I was at the KA store.

Not being a baker, especially of bread, this should be an adventure.

I hope you're feeling better.

nancy


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Old 18-09-2007, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default alt.bread.recipes faq has moved


"The Cook" wrote

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 10:16:57 -0400, "Nancy Young"
wrote:


So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.


Here is Barb's "Mom's Rye Bread" recipe. I think I screwed up when I
tried. Had a bunch of people in the kitchen and I got distracted.
Need to try it again.


Hey, thanks! Also printed and saved. This should be interesting.

nancy




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Old 18-09-2007, 05:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 654
Default alt.bread.recipes faq has moved


"Nancy Young" wrote in message
. ..

"Janet B." wrote

"Nancy Young" wrote


"Janet B." wrote

http://www.abrfaq.info/

So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.


It can be as difficult as you want to make it. There are plenty of rye
recipes that use enough white flour to overcome the stickiness of the
rye -- they are easy to make. There are rye recipes that use yeast to
make them rise and they are easy. The purists insist on making a 'sour'
first and using that to rise the bread. That's a little more difficult,
although it depends upon the recipe. Then there are those that do the
real pumpernickle that cooks for a long, long time at a low temperature
and that's a toughie. There is everything in between. Rye flour doesn't
behave the way that white flour does. It's sticky, it isn't elastic and
it doesn't rise as high. For a first effort, try a recipe that has a lot
of white flour in relationship with rye flour. Try to avoid the recipes
that have you use coffee, chocolate, etc., they are there for color and
are not needed for rye flavor. Bread cookbooks are a good source of good
recipes and information. Ask some questions at alt.bread.recipes.
Everyone there will be happy to help. KA will be another good place to
start. Ask them for some first steps help. They can give you everything
from rye bread in a bottle flavoring to all the basic flour needed to do
it from scratch. I believe their rye flour comes with a recipe or maybe
it is the first clear flour that comes with a rye recipe. I envy you
being able to go to the store and shop. Although, maybe not, my purse
couldn't stand the traffic. I haven't baked any bread since early 2005
as I haven't been well. I'm planning on getting back into it in a month
or so and am currently stocking up on all the different flour and making
my list for KA. Have fun!!!


Thank you so much for this note, I've printed it for future reference.
I was going to buy some additive while I was at the KA store.

Not being a baker, especially of bread, this should be an adventure.

I hope you're feeling better.

nancy

My pleasure. I hope you will come and join us at alt.bread.recipes. And
yes, I am much better -- the radiation played hell with my gizzard.
Janet


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Old 18-09-2007, 05:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default alt.bread.recipes faq has moved

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 10:16:57 -0400, "Nancy Young"
wrote:


"Janet B." wrote

http://www.abrfaq.info/


So, you're into baking bread. I was wondering, do you think
that making rye bread is difficult? I'm going to be stopping by
King Arthur Flour in a week or two and I was thinking of picking
up supplies there.

nancy

Here is Barb's "Mom's Rye Bread" recipe. I think I screwed up when I
tried. Had a bunch of people in the kitchen and I got distracted.
Need to try it again.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Mom¹s Rye Bread

Recipe By :Gustavus Adolphus¹ Evie (Ma) Young
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Breads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 cup milk
1 cup water
2 1/2 Tbsp. shortening
1/2 cup molasses
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground anise
2 pkgs. dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
1 Tbsp. sugar
2 cups rye flour
4 cups white flour (4 to 5)

Scald milk; add water, shortening, molasses, 1/2 cup sugar, salt, and
anise.

Dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup warm water and 1 Tbsp. sugar.

When milk mixture is lukewarm, add yeast, then rye flour and mix
until smooth.

Add white flour until dough is easy to handle. Turn dough onto
floured board and knead for about 10 minutes until smooth.

Place in greased bowl and let rise in warm place until doubled --
about 2 hours.

Measure and round into 3 balls. Cover and let rest 15 minutes. Place
in greased pans.

Let rise; bake at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes. After removing from
oven, brush with butter.

Source:
"Minneapolis Tribune, December 21, 1981. Posted to RFC by Barb
Schaller on 12-19-2000"
Yield:
"3 loaves"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 2068 Calories; 45g Fat (18.8%
calories from fat); 33g Protein; 400g Carbohydrate; 11g Dietary Fiber;
33mg Cholesterol; 2335mg Sodium. Exchanges: 10 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2
Lean Meat; 1 Non-Fat Milk; 8 1/2 Fat; 15 Other Carbohydrates.

NOTES : Won 2nd place at the Minnesota State Fair with this recipe,
1991.
Slight adjustment: Used equal parts molasses and honey for measure of
molasses.



Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)


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