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Old 06-10-2003, 07:23 PM
Frank A. Chris Dohrmann
 
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Default Deep Fryers

I just bought my first covered deep fryer with a thermostat, ready
light, and timer.
I would like to know if you can let the oil sit in it for a period of
time or do you have to empty it after each use.
Any experience you can pass on to me would be highly appreciated

Rudyard Kipling said "Words are the most powerful drugs used by mankind"
---
I am a Bright.


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Old 06-10-2003, 08:13 PM
Dave Smith
 
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Default Deep Fryers

"Frank A. Chris Dohrmann" wrote:

I just bought my first covered deep fryer with a thermostat, ready
light, and timer.
I would like to know if you can let the oil sit in it for a period of
time or do you have to empty it after each use.
Any experience you can pass on to me would be highly appreciated


I keep mine in the cupboard for months, using it maybe once every week or
two.


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Old 06-10-2003, 09:23 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default Deep Fryers

"Frank A. Chris Dohrmann" wrote:

I just bought my first covered deep fryer.
I would like to know if you can let the oil
sit in it for a period of time or do you have
to empty it after each use.


Essentially depends on what types and quantities of food
you've cooked... cooking oil does not remain utile as long
from cooking meats as from cooking veggies. But regardless,
your oil will remain useful much longer if drained and strained
immediately after use, the fryer cleaned, and the oil stored in the
fridge for a week, longer in the freezer. And if used to fry fish, liver,
or other strong flavored items don't even think of saving that oil...
unless of course you enjoy liver lickin' good freedom fries


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 07-10-2003, 08:23 AM
Bob Pastorio
 
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Default Deep Fryers

Frank A. Chris Dohrmann wrote:

I just bought my first covered deep fryer with a thermostat, ready
light, and timer.
I would like to know if you can let the oil sit in it for a period of
time or do you have to empty it after each use.
Any experience you can pass on to me would be highly appreciated


Oil will wear out over time. The variables a how much is it used,
at what temperature, to cook what, filtered?

You can let it sit in the fryer and it'll be usable for a couple
months assuming you don't use it very often at high temperatures to
cook a lot of fish and offal and you filter it. It's a better idea to
filter it and put it into a container that you can tuck into a cool,
dark cupboard. Some people put oil in the fridge or freeze it. I don't
find that necessary and never did it in my restaurants.

Even in daily use, our fryers didn't need the oil changed any more
often than every two weeks or so as determined by the test kits from
the oil manufacturers. And that's with 6 am to midnight operation,
every day.

And when you discard the oil, save a cup or so and dump it into the
new oil. New oil doesn't brown food as well as the used oil. I
wouldn't discard the oil any more often than about a dozen uses and
maybe not even then. It will darken over time, but that's not, in and
of itself, the test for replacement. The smoke point will gradually go
lower and lower until it's smoking at normal frying temps (325F to
365F). Then it's time to see if the flavors are still good. If not,
dump it.

The used oil is good for lots of non-culinary things. Brush it on your
flagstone walks. Brush it on clay flower pots. Mix a lot of bird seed
in it and let it harden in the winter cold to feed the wild critters.
Brush it on unfinished fence rails and posts. Pour it down mole holes
and vole holes (they don't like it).

Pastorio



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Old 07-10-2003, 11:31 AM
Jack Schidt®
 
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Default Deep Fryers


"Bob Pastorio" wrote in message
...


The used oil is good for lots of non-culinary things. Brush it on your
flagstone walks. Brush it on clay flower pots. Mix a lot of bird seed
in it and let it harden in the winter cold to feed the wild critters.
Brush it on unfinished fence rails and posts. Pour it down mole holes
and vole holes (they don't like it).


And, as some of us from the more northern latitudes will attest, rub some on
a snow shovel and the snow won't stick to it.

Jack Frost


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Old 07-10-2003, 07:46 PM
Bob Pastorio
 
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Default Deep Fryers

Jack Schidt=AE wrote:

"Bob Pastorio" wrote in message
...
=20
The used oil is good for lots of non-culinary things. Brush it on your
flagstone walks. Brush it on clay flower pots. Mix a lot of bird seed
in it and let it harden in the winter cold to feed the wild critters.
Brush it on unfinished fence rails and posts. Pour it down mole holes
and vole holes (they don't like it).


And, as some of us from the more northern latitudes will attest, rub so=

me on
a snow shovel and the snow won't stick to it.
=20
Jack Frost


Cool. New one to add to the list.

Pastorio

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Old 08-10-2003, 01:38 AM
Harry Demidavicius
 
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Default Deep Fryers

On Tue, 07 Oct 2003 10:31:19 GMT, "Jack Schidt®"
wrote:


"Bob Pastorio" wrote in message
...


The used oil is good for lots of non-culinary things. Brush it on your
flagstone walks. Brush it on clay flower pots. Mix a lot of bird seed
in it and let it harden in the winter cold to feed the wild critters.
Brush it on unfinished fence rails and posts. Pour it down mole holes
and vole holes (they don't like it).


And, as some of us from the more northern latitudes will attest, rub some on
a snow shovel and the snow won't stick to it.

Jack Frost

Pam works a lot neater. Try it across the bottom of your garage door
too.

Harry
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Old 08-10-2003, 05:36 PM
j*ni p.
 
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Default Deep Fryers

Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:
"j*ni p." wrote in message
...


snip

Okay, call me an ignoramus, but why would one want to oil the
bottom of a garage door?


Water gets under them and in winter will freeze, causing the door to stick
when trying to open it. A coating of oil will keep the water from bonding
with the bottom of the door (usually lined with some type of
weatherstripping, rubber and whatnot) and the concrete garage floor.

Jack Overhead


OIC! It usually doesn't freeze that hard around here (Western WA,
think soggy), so it's not a problem I've come up against. And the
year I lived in Pennsylvania, we didn't have a garage... :-)


--
j*ni p. ~ mom, gamer, novice cook ~
...fish heads, fish heads, eat them up, yum!
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Old 08-10-2003, 08:39 PM
Jack Schidt®
 
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Default Deep Fryers


"j*ni p." wrote in message
...
Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:
"j*ni p." wrote in message
...


snip

Okay, call me an ignoramus, but why would one want to oil the
bottom of a garage door?


Water gets under them and in winter will freeze, causing the door to

stick
when trying to open it. A coating of oil will keep the water from

bonding
with the bottom of the door (usually lined with some type of
weatherstripping, rubber and whatnot) and the concrete garage floor.

Jack Overhead


OIC! It usually doesn't freeze that hard around here (Western WA,
think soggy), so it's not a problem I've come up against. And the
year I lived in Pennsylvania, we didn't have a garage... :-)


See? You don't need to get extra cooking oil then. Problem solved!

Jack Climate


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Old 08-10-2003, 08:56 PM
j*ni p.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Deep Fryers

Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:

"j*ni p." wrote in message
...
Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:
"j*ni p." wrote in message
...


snip

Okay, call me an ignoramus, but why would one want to oil the
bottom of a garage door?


Water gets under them and in winter will freeze, causing the door
to stick when trying to open it. A coating of oil will keep the
water from bonding
with the bottom of the door (usually lined with some type of
weatherstripping, rubber and whatnot) and the concrete garage floor.

Jack Overhead


OIC! It usually doesn't freeze that hard around here (Western WA,
think soggy), so it's not a problem I've come up against. And the
year I lived in Pennsylvania, we didn't have a garage... :-)


See? You don't need to get extra cooking oil then. Problem solved!

Jack Climate


Hey, you're right! Thanks Jack, what would we do without you... ;-)


--
j*ni p. ~ mom, gamer, novice cook ~
...fish heads, fish heads, eat them up, yum!
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Old 08-10-2003, 09:22 PM
Jack Schidt®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Deep Fryers


"j*ni p." wrote in message
...
Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:

"j*ni p." wrote in message
...
Hark! I heard "Jack Schidt®" say:
"j*ni p." wrote in message
...

snip

Okay, call me an ignoramus, but why would one want to oil the
bottom of a garage door?

Water gets under them and in winter will freeze, causing the door
to stick when trying to open it. A coating of oil will keep the
water from bonding
with the bottom of the door (usually lined with some type of
weatherstripping, rubber and whatnot) and the concrete garage floor.

Jack Overhead

OIC! It usually doesn't freeze that hard around here (Western WA,
think soggy), so it's not a problem I've come up against. And the
year I lived in Pennsylvania, we didn't have a garage... :-)


See? You don't need to get extra cooking oil then. Problem solved!

Jack Climate


Hey, you're right! Thanks Jack, what would we do without you... ;-)


I'm here to help not to hinder. All just part of my posterial duties.

Jack Assist

--
j*ni p. ~ mom, gamer, novice cook ~
...fish heads, fish heads, eat them up, yum!



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