Chocolate (rec.food.chocolate) all topics related to eating and making chocolate such as cooking techniques, recipes, history, folklore & source recommendations.

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Old 21-08-2008, 11:04 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

A few years ago I and my family enthusiastically signed up for a tour
of a "chocolate factory." I was expecting to see roasted cocoa beans
on one side of the factory and chocolate on the other. Instead I saw
that the factory started with 5 kg or 10 kg slabs of chocolate
purchased from chocolate wholesalers. Slabs were tossed into a giant
cauldron of molten chocolate in the middle of the factory. Molten
chocolate was then taken from there to make a huge variety of
chocolate candies some of which were specifically designed for the
local market.

I told the owner of my surprise about not seeing chocolate being made.
He explained that there were only about 12 chocolate makers in the
whole world. Companies such as Hershey, Cadbury, Nestle, Mars and
Ghirardelli fit into that category. However, companies such as Godiva,
Sees and thousands of others make chocolate products but do not make
chocolate itself.

I thought the readers of this group would be interested in this
knowledge. Can those of you in the know confirm it?

Which other companies make chocolate as opposed to create and market
chocolate products?

So if one is a chocoholic who enjoys all chocolate products but
particularly likes plain, neat unadulterated chocolate, wouldn't one
only buy chocolate bars from the chocolate makers.

By the way the the factory I visited was Sherm Edwards Candies in
Trafford, PA. The tour was lots of fun and the owner was friendly and
enthusiastic.

Where does one go to tour a chocolate factory that makes chocolate. A
few years ago we went to Hershey, PA but that factory tour was not a
factory tour instead it was a simulated factory a la Disney style -
nice, very nice but not the real deal.

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Old 22-08-2008, 01:06 AM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

Farrel wrote:
A few years ago I and my family enthusiastically signed up for a tour
of a "chocolate factory." I was expecting to see roasted cocoa beans
on one side of the factory and chocolate on the other. Instead I saw
that the factory started with 5 kg or 10 kg slabs of chocolate
purchased from chocolate wholesalers. Slabs were tossed into a giant
cauldron of molten chocolate in the middle of the factory. Molten
chocolate was then taken from there to make a huge variety of
chocolate candies some of which were specifically designed for the
local market.

I told the owner of my surprise about not seeing chocolate being made.
He explained that there were only about 12 chocolate makers in the
whole world. Companies such as Hershey, Cadbury, Nestle, Mars and
Ghirardelli fit into that category. However, companies such as Godiva,
Sees and thousands of others make chocolate products but do not make
chocolate itself.


I thought the readers of this group would be interested in this
knowledge. Can those of you in the know confirm it?

Which other companies make chocolate as opposed to create and market
chocolate products?



Try Scharffen Berger, I think they have a great show in Berkeley as
well as
a chocolate cafe. There is another SFBA maker beside Scharffen Berger and
Ghirardelli. Oh yes, Guittard and they most likely make their stuff
from beans.

Most likely Michel Cluizel does his own since I am sure that I have seen
pure varietals and 99% Chocolate bars at Fog City News, in addition to the
bourchons which are exquisite (when fresh) which are cork shaped bon-bons
with a center of Bordeaux infused ganache. Just to die for.

So if one is a chocoholic who enjoys all chocolate products but
particularly likes plain, neat unadulterated chocolate, wouldn't one
only buy chocolate bars from the chocolate makers.

Well I buy stuff from retailers and even Trader Joe's has it own
factory which
was recently moved leading to supply problems. Maybe TJ's factory just
makes
the bars but I think it may be working on the chocolate production as well.
Last I heard it was in Belgium though.

By the way the the factory I visited was Sherm Edwards Candies in
Trafford, PA. The tour was lots of fun and the owner was friendly and
enthusiastic.

Where does one go to tour a chocolate factory that makes chocolate. A
few years ago we went to Hershey, PA but that factory tour was not a
factory tour instead it was a simulated factory a la Disney style -
nice, very nice but not the real deal.

San Francisco Bay Area, www.sharffenberger.com to check the current
situation.

I you can find anything about tours of the other factories via
Google kindly let us know.

later
bliss -- C O C O A Powered... (at california dot com)

--
bobbie sellers - a retired nurse in San Francisco

"It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of cocoa that the thoughts acquire speed,
the thighs acquire girth, the girth become a warning.
It is by theobromine alone I set my mind in motion."
--from Someone else's Dune spoof ripped to my taste.

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Old 22-08-2008, 02:33 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers (commercial)

I've run into that situation with my business, Chiammaya Custom
Crafted Chocolate.

After visiting Oaxaca Mexico on vacation several years ago I saw
chocolate being made in it's original form; stone ground , minimally
processed and delicious.

I decided I should bring this back to the USA. My plan was to locate
small kiosks in up scale grocery stores and make fresh chocolate for
the customers on a demand basis.

When I called on prospective sites and told them I make chocolate the
assumed I made chocolateS. No I had to explain, I grind cacao, sugar,
cinnamon and almonds in the Mexican tradition to make chocolate, good
for hot chocolate, baking, deserts etc. Though it CAN be eaten as a
candy bar it will surprise most because of its rustic texture.

You can see it being made on my web site http://www.chiammaya.com

or, if you are in the Huntington WV area, give me a call and I'll
invite you over to make some chocolate just for you.

I do have a setup that will allow me to take this on the road, and do
attend select fairs, festivals and events, I AM very selective.

Hope that helps,

Walt
Chiammaya

On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 15:04:47 -0700 (PDT), Farrel
wrote:

A few years ago I and my family enthusiastically signed up for a tour
of a "chocolate factory." I was expecting to see roasted cocoa beans
on one side of the factory and chocolate on the other. Instead I saw
that the factory started with 5 kg or 10 kg slabs of chocolate
purchased from chocolate wholesalers. Slabs were tossed into a giant
cauldron of molten chocolate in the middle of the factory. Molten
chocolate was then taken from there to make a huge variety of
chocolate candies some of which were specifically designed for the
local market.

I told the owner of my surprise about not seeing chocolate being made.
He explained that there were only about 12 chocolate makers in the
whole world. Companies such as Hershey, Cadbury, Nestle, Mars and
Ghirardelli fit into that category. However, companies such as Godiva,
Sees and thousands of others make chocolate products but do not make
chocolate itself.

I thought the readers of this group would be interested in this
knowledge. Can those of you in the know confirm it?

Which other companies make chocolate as opposed to create and market
chocolate products?

So if one is a chocoholic who enjoys all chocolate products but
particularly likes plain, neat unadulterated chocolate, wouldn't one
only buy chocolate bars from the chocolate makers.

By the way the the factory I visited was Sherm Edwards Candies in
Trafford, PA. The tour was lots of fun and the owner was friendly and
enthusiastic.

Where does one go to tour a chocolate factory that makes chocolate. A
few years ago we went to Hershey, PA but that factory tour was not a
factory tour instead it was a simulated factory a la Disney style -
nice, very nice but not the real deal.

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Old 22-08-2008, 11:00 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

* * Well I buy stuff from retailers and even Trader Joe's has it own
factory which
was recently moved leading to supply problems. *Maybe TJ's factory just
makes
the bars but I think it may be working on the chocolate production as well.
Last I heard it was in Belgium though.


I have no knowledge, but would be very surprised if Trader Joe made
their own chocolate. I would strongly presume that they have
contracted with a Belgian chocolate maker to produce bars under the
Trader Joe name. Incidentally, their chocolate is wonderful and on a
price per gram basis is darn darn cheap. I once did an interesting
comparsion of regular Hershey bar (60 g or so) vs Lindt bar vs Barry
Callebaut broken up into 500g blocks by Whole Foods and Trader Joe
slab (about 250g). The last two were so much cheaper (per gram) and
Trader Joe's was phenomenally cheap. But then with so much chocolate
in the house one just eats more chocolate. That invevitably costs more
money and more time. The time is need to exercise to burn the energy
content off. I have no chocolate satiety center in my brain.
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Old 23-08-2008, 04:03 AM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

Farrel wrote:
Well I buy stuff from retailers and even Trader Joe's has it own
factory which
was recently moved leading to supply problems. Maybe TJ's factory just
makes
the bars but I think it may be working on the chocolate production as well.
Last I heard it was in Belgium though.


I have no knowledge, but would be very surprised if Trader Joe made
their own chocolate. I would strongly presume that they have
contracted with a Belgian chocolate maker to produce bars under the
Trader Joe name. Incidentally, their chocolate is wonderful and on a
price per gram basis is darn darn cheap. I once did an interesting
comparsion of regular Hershey bar (60 g or so) vs Lindt bar vs Barry
Callebaut broken up into 500g blocks by Whole Foods and Trader Joe
slab (about 250g). The last two were so much cheaper (per gram) and
Trader Joe's was phenomenally cheap. But then with so much chocolate
in the house one just eats more chocolate. That invevitably costs more
money and more time. The time is need to exercise to burn the energy
content off. I have no chocolate satiety center in my brain.

If I could not limit myself to an ounce or less of chocolate
per day I would have to quit eating it. Usually I hold myself
to a third of an ounce and a tablespoon of cocoa in my drink
in the morning. Of course once a month I chop up a couple
of ounces of chocolate, and with 6 tablespoons of cocoa and
3 of chocolate bits make my infamous rice muffins with
walnuts and cranberries. 6 muffins that is and I freeze them
to eat over the next couple of weeks.

I do love my chocolate but moderation in all things but
recipes.

later
bliss -- C O C O A Powered... (at california dot com)

--
bobbie sellers - a retired nurse in San Francisco

"It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of cocoa that the thoughts acquire speed,
the thighs acquire girth, the girth become a warning.
It is by theobromine alone I set my mind in motion."
--from Someone else's Dune spoof ripped to my taste.




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Old 23-08-2008, 05:27 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

Try Scharffen Berger, I think they have a great show in Berkeley as
well as
a chocolate cafe. There is another SFBA maker beside Scharffen Berger and
Ghirardelli. Oh yes, Guittard and they most likely make their stuff
from beans.

Sharffenberger had a great tour, at least they did a few years ago. I
hope it is still there.

There is also a new chocolate maker in San Francisco, Tcho. They have
been at a few events in the area giving out samples. Very nice, very
dark chocolate.

--
Queenie

*** Be the change you wish to see in the world ***
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Old 24-08-2008, 02:38 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

Farrel wrote:
I told the owner of my surprise about not seeing chocolate being made.
He explained that there were only about 12 chocolate makers in the
whole world. Companies such as Hershey, Cadbury, Nestle, Mars and
Ghirardelli fit into that category. However, companies such as Godiva,
Sees and thousands of others make chocolate products but do not make
chocolate itself.


This is pretty much true, though there are some boutique grinders, the
majority of chocolate makers buy large bars wholesale and melt them.
There is some art in getting the particular type of chocolate and
some will add chocolate liquor and/or cocoa powder to adjust the
flavor profile.

I thought the readers of this group would be interested in this
knowledge. Can those of you in the know confirm it?


Which other companies make chocolate as opposed to create and market
chocolate products?


There are some new small batch machines for conching (the process
of grinding beans into smooth chocolate) just now coming onto the
market and you may see more small boutique grinders popping up.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
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Old 13-10-2008, 10:53 AM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

On Aug 21, 3:04*pm, Farrel wrote:
A few years ago I and my family enthusiastically signed up for a tour
of a "chocolate factory." I was expecting to see roasted cocoa beans
on one side of the factory and chocolate on the other. Instead I saw
that the factory started with 5 kg or 10 kg slabs of chocolate
purchased from chocolate wholesalers. Slabs were tossed into a giant
cauldron of molten chocolate in the middle of the factory. Molten
chocolate was then taken from there to make a huge variety of
chocolate candies some of which were specifically designed for the
local market.

I told the owner of my surprise about not seeing chocolate being made.
He explained that there were only about 12 chocolate makers in the
whole world. Companies such as Hershey, Cadbury, Nestle, Mars and
Ghirardelli fit into that category. However, companies such as Godiva,
Sees and thousands of others make chocolate products but do not make
chocolate itself.

I thought the readers of this group would be interested in this
knowledge. Can those of you in the know confirm it?

Which other companies make chocolate as opposed to create and market
chocolate products?

So if one is a chocoholic who enjoys all chocolate products but
particularly likes plain, neat unadulterated chocolate, wouldn't one
only buy chocolate bars from the chocolate makers.

By the way the the factory I visited was Sherm Edwards Candies in
Trafford, PA. The tour was lots of fun and the owner was friendly and
enthusiastic.

Where does one go to tour a chocolate factory that makes chocolate. A
few years ago we went to Hershey, PA but that factory tour was not a
factory tour instead it was a simulated factory a la Disney style -
nice, very nice but not the real deal.


www.roguechocolates.com was on martha stewart...he buys the cacao
beans and makes his own chocolate all thru the whole process...and he
makes his own machines to make the chocolate...guy is a wizzard...just
genius...no wonder martha is smitten with this kid...it is a difficult
process and if you go look at this, you will see...also, if you go to
the "chocolate alchemy" guy...he will help you do it yourself at
home...let me go get the proper addy's for these two....okay, the guy
is here in the states http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/ and i hope to
learn how to make chocolate this way, too...
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Old 14-10-2008, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.chocolate
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Default Chocolate makers vs. chocolatiers

nawteeschocolate wrote:

the "chocolate alchemy" guy...he will help you do it yourself at
home...let me go get the proper addy's for these two....okay, the guy
is here in the states http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/ and i hope to
learn how to make chocolate this way, too...


That is a great web site! I may need to practice
restraint here. Let's see, I've already got the
Champion, but I'll need the Santha and the Behmor.
I've got a mill similar to the Crankenstein, though
mine is much smaller.


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