Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 10-05-2004, 07:39 PM
Darrell Grainger
 
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Default first birthday cake

My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for her. I
know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake (nuts, eggs,
honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it in
the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a cake
that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how these are
made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find anything about
technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking something
like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other suggestions?

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to

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Old 10-05-2004, 08:14 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in message
...
My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for her. I
know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake (nuts, eggs,
honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it in
the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a cake
that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how these are
made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find anything about
technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking something
like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other suggestions?


I know this will sound harsh, but you are really baking the cake for you.
The one year old would be happy with Hostess Twinkie and a sippy cup of Kool
Aid. Therefore, you should make a cake that pleases you, taking into
consideration any dietary restrictions noted by the parents. If you want
ideas for cakes, I would recommend picking up a copy of the Wilton Yearbook
of Cake Decorating. This is a magazine format publication available where
cake decorating supplies are sold. It will have dozens of example of cakes
with instruction detailing the equipment and techniques particular to the
production of each cake.


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Old 10-05-2004, 09:12 PM
Darrell Grainger
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake

On Mon, 10 May 2004, Vox Humana wrote:


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in message
...
My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for her. I
know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake (nuts, eggs,
honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it in
the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a cake
that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how these are
made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find anything about
technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking something
like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other suggestions?


I know this will sound harsh, but you are really baking the cake for you.
The one year old would be happy with Hostess Twinkie and a sippy cup of Kool
Aid. Therefore, you should make a cake that pleases you, taking into
consideration any dietary restrictions noted by the parents. If you want
ideas for cakes, I would recommend picking up a copy of the Wilton Yearbook
of Cake Decorating. This is a magazine format publication available where
cake decorating supplies are sold. It will have dozens of example of cakes
with instruction detailing the equipment and techniques particular to the
production of each cake.


I actually plan on making two cakes. One for the adults that tastes really
good and one for my god-child that looks really good. I was thinking big
but simple graphics like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty
because they should be recognisible to her. I'm just not sure 1) if these
are characters that a 1 year old would recognise (haven't been watching
too much kids cartoons lately) and 2) how would I make it 3d.

The time with the panda bear, the kid could not care less about what the
cake was made out of. The parents got some great shots of the kid trying
to hug the panda bear cake. Quite the mess but these are the sort of
photos my friends are looking for too.

Thanks for the recommendation for Wilton Yearbook of Cake Decorating. I
looked it up on the web. I searched the Wilton site and found instructions
for just what I was looking for. Looks like I'll have to buy/rent some
pans for creating a stand-up bear.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to
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Old 11-05-2004, 12:57 AM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake

at Mon, 10 May 2004 19:14:51 GMT in
, (Vox Humana)
wrote :


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in
message ...
My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for
her. I know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake
(nuts, eggs, honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it
in the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a
cake that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how
these are made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find
anything about technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking
something like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other
suggestions?


I know this will sound harsh, but you are really baking the cake for
you. The one year old would be happy with Hostess Twinkie and a sippy
cup of Kool Aid.


Don't underestimate how much kids can sense and appreciate the difference
between a good and bad cake. While it's true to say that a young child will
be perfectly happy with a Twinkie, I have also seen that even very young
children do notice the difference between a good cake and a Twinkie, if
they've been exposed to both, and will choose the good cake preferentially
over the Twinkie. The difference between them and an adult is that there is
no palpable disappointment if the cake they're confronted with isn't a
great one, and that, presented with a cheap cake or Twinkie, they most
likely won't refuse it outright.

However, they *will* refuse outright a cake with a flavour that they don't
like at all. A kid who doesn't like chocolate (my niece is one) would most
likely refuse a chocolate cake, one who didn't like lemon a lemon cake,
etc. Also, visuals are important. They aren't likely to be too interested
in a cake that looks ugly or plain. (On that count, the Twinkie wouldn't be
that successful). OTOH, the same could be said for adults. I have seen a
majority of adults choose a very pretty-*looking* cake over one that might
not be so perfect in appearance but which tasted great.

Cupcakes always go down well. They're easy to make, and easy to decorate so
they look pretty. Kids, especially small kids, also like them because the
size isn't overwhelming. I've seen most kids are obviously intimidated by
large cakes - they're far too big for them.

As far as what she would like, what does she seem to be attracted to right
now? Think about both the foods she likes and the activities she seems to
be interested in. For instance, when my young nephew turned 1, I had the
same idea you had. It didn't take long to think of what he'd like. Even at
that age he gobbled down blueberries as though they were going out of
style. And he was fascinated by his dad's construction projects. So, I made
a blueberry cake (sort of like a very light blueberry muffin) and covered
it with blueberry paste (literally, condensed, mashed blueberries). Then we
set some toy tools on top. He had great fun with it. Made himself
incredibly messy. Just what one would hope for.

--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)


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Old 11-05-2004, 02:19 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Mon, 10 May 2004 19:14:51 GMT in
, (Vox Humana)
wrote :


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in
message ...
My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for
her. I know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake
(nuts, eggs, honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it
in the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a
cake that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how
these are made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find
anything about technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking
something like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other
suggestions?


I know this will sound harsh, but you are really baking the cake for
you. The one year old would be happy with Hostess Twinkie and a sippy
cup of Kool Aid.


Don't underestimate how much kids can sense and appreciate the difference
between a good and bad cake. While it's true to say that a young child

will
be perfectly happy with a Twinkie, I have also seen that even very young
children do notice the difference between a good cake and a Twinkie, if
they've been exposed to both, and will choose the good cake preferentially
over the Twinkie.


I read the same sort of thing on the Disney World newsgroups about how
people can only stay at Disney's deluxe resorts because the toddler can tell
the difference between a parlor suite on the concierge floor of the Grand
Floridian Resort and Spa over a standard room a value resort like Disney's
Pop Century resort.



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Old 11-05-2004, 11:00 PM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake

at Tue, 11 May 2004 13:19:26 GMT in
, (Vox
Humana) wrote :


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
.. .
at Mon, 10 May 2004 19:14:51 GMT in
,
(Vox
Humana)
wrote :
"Darrell Grainger" wrote in
message ...

....
Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking
something like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any
other suggestions?

I know this will sound harsh, but you are really baking the cake for
you. The one year old would be happy with Hostess Twinkie and a sippy
cup of Kool Aid.


Don't underestimate how much kids can sense and appreciate the
difference between a good and bad cake. ...


I read the same sort of thing on the Disney World newsgroups about how
people can only stay at Disney's deluxe resorts because the toddler can
tell the difference between a parlor suite on the concierge floor of the
Grand Floridian Resort and Spa over a standard room a value resort like
Disney's Pop Century resort.


Off-topic digression:

If this is actually verifiable, I wonder what the meaningful differences
are for the toddler? Food plays such a direct part in a toddler's life, and
the taste feedback is so immediate and undeniable, that it's easy to see
how a young kid could develop taste preferences and a sense of what's good
and bad.

However, when one speaks of the differences between a deluxe suite and a
standard room, many of the differences are, I think, ones that don't have
any direct impact on the child. Certain amenities that the child will never
use would fall into this category. If the kid is sleeping in a crib,
obviously the degree of luxury of the adult beds aren't going to have much
importance.

OTOH, other things would, I'm sure, be immediately appreciated. A young
child, crawling on the floor, would be likely to notice the differences
between cheap carpet and quality carpet rather fast. But I suspect a lot of
it may come down to the larger level of personal service and attention you
get in a luxury suite. Young kids, especially, thrive on personal attention
and with that much greater level they'd receive in a luxury suite, I'm sure
they'd remember it pretty permanently. There would also be a few very shy
individuals who would find more people intimidating - I wonder how many
kids might show a decided preference *against* such luxury suites, for that
exact reason? (Just like some adults who don't appreciate what they
consider to be an intrusive, pandering staff!)


--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 13-05-2004, 09:16 PM
Chris and Bob Neidecker
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in message

I actually plan on making two cakes. One for the adults that tastes really
good and one for my god-child that looks really good. I was thinking big
but simple graphics like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty
because they should be recognisible to her. I'm just not sure 1) if these
are characters that a 1 year old would recognise (haven't been watching
too much kids cartoons lately) and 2) how would I make it 3d.


I am a mom of three kids, and here's my take...the baby will be exposed to
(and probably addicted to) licensed characters soon enough. Hopefully this
baby (yes, BABY...a one-year-old isn't a kid, he or she is still a baby,
verging on toddlerhood) hasn't been watching cartoons, but may recognize
characters from books or toys. If you want something that your god-child
will recognize, call the parents and ask. Some kids like characters, but
some are just attached to their stuffed green elephant, or purple cat, or
brown bear. In a pinch, most kids like Pooh Bear, though.

Family Fun magazine (familyfun.com) has lots of cool birthday cake ideas.
Or just use your imagination and figure out what you can make out of
circles, squares and rectangles. I made a really cute kitty cat cake for my
daughter's 2nd bday. Just baked a round cake, frosted it pink (her favorite
color), added tortilla chips for ears (covered w/ frosting), and used gel
icings (from the supermarket) to draw whiskers, eyes, and mouth. Then I
baked some cupcakes to go along with it, frosted and decorated to look like
the mama cat.

A friend's daughter is wild for elephants, so the mom baked squares and
rectangles, cut small parts off for legs and tail, and frosted all the
parts, then put them together to resemble an elephant in profile. A gumdrop
eye, some icing for ear and mouth, and it was done. Simple, but really
cute.

As for making something so cute and lifelike that the child wants to hug the
cake,...no matter what cake you offer, that might happen, or it might not.
Just let the baby be himself or herself, and don't worry if you don't get
the same photo op as your friend's baby with the panda cake. Every child
has his or her shining moments, the unpredictability of which is part of the
charm.




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Old 18-05-2004, 12:45 AM
Nexis
 
Posts: n/a
Default first birthday cake


"Darrell Grainger" wrote in message
...
My god-child is turning 1 next month and I want to make a cake for her. I
know there are restrictions on what I can put in the cake (nuts, eggs,
honey, etc.).

My problem is that I don't know what kind of cake to make her. I was
thinking about a simple vanilla cake or a chiffon cake. Do I bake it in
the shape of something? Can I build something? I remember seeing a cake
that was a very three dimensional panda bear. Anyone know how these are
made? I tried hunting around the web but I couldn't find anything about
technique.

Additionally, what would a 1 year old girl like? I was thinking something
like Blues Clues, Winnie The Pooh or Hello Kitty. Any other suggestions?

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to



Well first, why the restriction on eggs? Is she allergic? You're going to be
hard pressed to find a cake recipe with no eggs, I'm afraid.

If she's not allergic, I would make a simple cake, white, yellow or
chocolate, and maybe do a carousel (tiered layers decorated with bright
colors, and you can either make animals from icing or use animal crackers).
At her age, characters won't matter as much as bright colors.

kimberly




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