Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 31-10-2007, 01:35 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.


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Old 01-11-2007, 03:50 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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stark wrote:
It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.

Hardtack?
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Old 01-11-2007, 12:35 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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On Oct 31, 9:50 pm, Dave Bell wrote:
stark wrote:
It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.


Hardtack?


Could be. There's something called rusk and there's zweibach, but I
was thinking there's a specific name for bread in whole loaf
preservation. There's a small treatise on reconstituting stale bread
in The Bread Book dtd 1640 which instructs one to dip the loaf in cold
water then heat in a gentle oven, claiming that the bread tastes
almost fresh.

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Old 02-11-2007, 12:41 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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On Nov 1, 3:30 pm, the pilgrim wrote:
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 02:50:07 GMT, Dave Bell wrote:
stark wrote:
It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.


Hardtack?


Seabiscuit?



Nah, he quit racing decades ago.


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Old 20-11-2007, 12:48 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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In article .com,
stark wrote:

It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.


Sounds like a rusk to me.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Notes about our meals in Tuscany have been posted to
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; 10-16-2007


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Old 20-11-2007, 01:38 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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On Nov 19, 5:48 pm, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:
In article .com,

stark wrote:
It's for an English word that describes a bread that has been
preserved by toasting or heating. Naturally the bread is no longer
fresh; it's hard and usable only for dunking in soups or stews or
maybe used as a thickener. But the bread keeps for a long while
without
becoming mouldy. As I understand it the bread required no special
handling, just hung
in bags or sacks until it was used.


Sounds like a rusk to me.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ


That may be it, or the closest I'm gonna get. I remember it as Holland
rusk but English accepts all comers. Thanks.



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