Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-02-2007, 07:14 AM posted to alt.recipes,alt.food.recipes,rec.food.cooking,alt.bread.recipes,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

A month and two days equals "almost two months?"

Sure hope you use a timer for cooking....

pltrgyst wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 10:05:05 -0600, Alan wrote:

As anyone who cooks much knows, making pizza is very easy!

On Sat, 16 Dec 2006 10:46:44 -0500, John
wrote:


Well, much easier than thinking, anyway, since it took you almost two months to
comment on this thread, and inanity is the best you could do.

-- Larry


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Old 12-02-2007, 07:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

On Feb 11, 6:51 pm, Dan Abel wrote:
In article ,
(Victor Sack) wrote:

Alan wrote:


Have a pizza stone in your oven.


Turn the oven on high before you start assembling the crust
and the ingredients, so that stone is HOT before you put the
pizza on it.


Nonsense.


You can fill your oven full of stones and rocks and it still won't be
anywhere near 485°C (905°F) required to make traditional pizza.


We just eat fake pizza. Works for us.


My mother was shown how to make pizza by an Italian. It is the
opposite of how pizza is made in the U.S. First the crust is coated
with olive oil. The meat, mushrooms, and other "filling" ingrediants
are placed on the pizza crust. Cheese goes on next. Then tomato
sauce on top. The main difference is that the crust does not get
soggy with the tomato sauce; the cheese melts to form a type of top
crust; and the "filling" being under the melted cheese does not get
overcooked and dried out. Have any of you had or seen pizza done
like this. Having grown up on it, I find traditional pizza inferior.

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Old 12-02-2007, 03:38 PM posted to alt.recipes,alt.food.recipes,rec.food.cooking,alt.bread.recipes,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

56 days is just a smidge more than one month and two days. Sure hope you use
someone else's brain for counting eggs...

-- Larry

On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 01:14:51 -0600, Christine wrote:

A month and two days equals "almost two months?"

Sure hope you use a timer for cooking....

pltrgyst wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 10:05:05 -0600, Alan wrote:

As anyone who cooks much knows, making pizza is very easy!

On Sat, 16 Dec 2006 10:46:44 -0500, John
wrote:


Well, much easier than thinking, anyway, since it took you almost two months to
comment on this thread, and inanity is the best you could do.

-- Larry

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Old 12-02-2007, 03:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

On 11 Feb 2007 23:44:30 -0800, "Shadowdog" wrote:

My mother was shown how to make pizza by an Italian. It is the
opposite of how pizza is made in the U.S. First the crust is coated
with olive oil. The meat, mushrooms, and other "filling" ingrediants
are placed on the pizza crust. Cheese goes on next. Then tomato
sauce on top. The main difference is that the crust does not get
soggy with the tomato sauce; the cheese melts to form a type of top
crust; and the "filling" being under the melted cheese does not get
overcooked and dried out. Have any of you had or seen pizza done
like this.


Yeah, that's how Pizza Slut does it. And that's not how it's done in Naples,
supposedly the home of pizza.

I oil the crust (especially when grilling pizza), then add sauce, etc. The oil
prevents the crust from absorbing the sauce.

-- Larry
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Old 12-02-2007, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

The best pizza dough I have ever used is the simplest, it's based on a dough
made for baguettes but it also works incredibly well for pizza. It is called
'PAIN a l'ANCIENNE' and I orignally found it in a book called "the bread
Bakers Apprentice"...a great book BTW. It's a very simple flour, water, salt
and yeast dough but with a twist, it's mixed cold and fermented cold first
to let some enzyme magic take place first. The flavor is much improved by
this method. King Arthur Bread flour works best but plain old Pillsbury All
Purpose isn't bad either and when I bake 6 pizzas for a bunch of my kid's
friends they get the .89 cents a bag pillsbury stuff and love it.

I found a copy of this recipe online with google so here is a link
http://www.shaboomskitchen.com/archi...lancienne.html

I make my pizza 15 inches round and as thin as I can make it, by hand, no
rolling pin.

I heat the oven with a stone or tiles to 550 for about 45 minutes, then
build the pizza on parchment paper, peel it onto the stone, after 5 minutes
I take it out with the peel, turn it 180 degrees and remove the parchment
and slide it right onto the stone, and it's done in 7 more minutes, for a
total of 12 minutes. Using the parchment lets me skip throwing semolina or
cornmeal all over the oven.This gives a nice dark, crispy crust, if you want
it lighter and chewier try 10-11 minutes, my wife prefers it that way.
Let the stone reheat 10 minutes at least between pies.

--

Mike S.

"Mike H" wrote in message
9.130...
Alan wrote in
:

As anyone who cooks much knows, making pizza is very easy!


But making a GOOD one isn't always so. Gotta do it right

I've used a Betty Crocker recipe for years, and don't worry
about brand-name tomatoes, etc. etc. etc.


Brand names can make a difference tho, for example, the use of King
Arthur AP Flour makes a difference in the final texture of the dough due
to the higher than normal AP protien levels.

THat said, I'm lazy, I just keep pouches of either Wal-Mart brand or
Martha White brand dough mix on hand, and put it together when I need it.
Tho now that I thursdays off, and friday is our Pizza day, I"ll likely
move to scratch dough.





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Old 12-02-2007, 10:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

Alan wrote:

Well, be a snob if you want to, that's your right.


You might want to check a good dictionary for a definition of 'snob'.
You might be surprised.

However, a person can make DELICIOUS pizza quickly and
easily -- in a non-snobby way.


You do not have to get defensive if you do not know the differences
between diffrently prepared foods or are unable to appreciate them. To
anyone who had pizza made by a master pizzaiolo in a good Italian,
especially Neapolitan, pizzeria, the differences to anything else is
immediately apparent. It is akin to comparing foie gras to chopped
liver. Pizza is not, nor has it ever been, a home-made dish. Anything
made at home in the way of pizza is but a pale imitation, however tasty
in itself. In Italy, pasta has always been associated with home and
family; pizza, on the other hand, has always been associated with a
mistress or a lover, something to go out to eat, in more way than one.

Pizza is a very traditional dish, taken very seriously in Italy, and
making it in a non-traditional way renders it not a pizza. Here is how
traditional pizza is supposed to be made - it is all but impossible to
reproduce this at home, lacking a commercial-grade wood-fired oven.
http://www.pizzanapoletana.org/images/file/disciplinare_stg_eng.pdf.

Victor

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Old 13-02-2007, 12:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.


-- in a non-snobby way.

You do not have to get defensive if you do not know the differences
between diffrently prepared foods or are unable to appreciate them. To
anyone who had pizza made by a master pizzaiolo in a good Italian,
especially Neapolitan, pizzeria, the differences to anything else is
immediately apparent. It is akin to comparing foie gras to chopped
liver. Pizza is not, nor has it ever been, a home-made dish. Anything
made at home in the way of pizza is but a pale imitation, however tasty
in itself. In Italy, pasta has always been associated with home and
family; pizza, on the other hand, has always been associated with a
mistress or a lover, something to go out to eat, in more way than one.

Pizza is a very traditional dish, taken very seriously in Italy, and
making it in a non-traditional way renders it not a pizza. Here is how
traditional pizza is supposed to be made - it is all but impossible to
reproduce this at home, lacking a commercial-grade wood-fired oven.
http://www.pizzanapoletana.org/images/file/disciplinare_stg_eng.pdf.

Victor


What would you then call a "DiGorno" frozen pizza or maybe a "red baron"
frozen pizza?


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Old 13-02-2007, 12:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

On Mon, 12 Feb 2007, Victor Sack wrote:

However, a person can make DELICIOUS pizza quickly and
easily -- in a non-snobby way.


Pizza is a very traditional dish, taken very seriously in Italy, and
making it in a non-traditional way renders it not a pizza. Here is how
traditional pizza is supposed to be made - it is all but impossible to
reproduce this at home, lacking a commercial-grade wood-fired oven.
http://www.pizzanapoletana.org/images/file/disciplinare_stg_eng.pdf.

Victor


Well, hell, Victor - that's the whole problem: Semantics!

Nobody here ever claimed to make "Pizza Napoletana STG".

That's a great whitepaper and defense of a particular, jealously guarded
style, but it is not the be-all and end-all definition of "pizza"...

Dave
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Old 13-02-2007, 12:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

Dave Bell wrote:

On Mon, 12 Feb 2007, Victor Sack wrote:

http://www.pizzanapoletana.org/images/file/disciplinare_stg_eng.pdf.


Well, hell, Victor - that's the whole problem: Semantics!

Nobody here ever claimed to make "Pizza Napoletana STG".


Ah, but the name and designation are actually incidental - it is just
the traditional way of making pizza that is being codified in the paper.

That's a great whitepaper and defense of a particular, jealously guarded
style, but it is not the be-all and end-all definition of "pizza"...


And I think it is just that. It is the original pizza and everything
else claiming that name has to at least strive to come close, otherwise
calling it a pizza would be ridiculous. Of course, it is semantics - as
everything ultimately is, but calling things by their particular names
facilitates communication. Somewhere the line has to be drawn to make
oneself understood at all. And we did discuss these things "here", i.e.
on rfc, before. People defended the Chicago style deep-dish pizza as
having a right to the name, too, yet not very much makes it similar to
the original pizza. People called it pizza to capitalise on the
familiar name, that is all. Otherwise, the names of some other
flatbreads could be used with the same justification, such as, for
example, those of the Ligurian focaccia, the Romagnola piadina, the
Calabrian pitta, a large crostino, the Turkish lahmaçun and, come to
think of it, the Ethiopian injera. Many, maybe most, so-called pizzas,
home-made and otherwise, have probably more in common with one or more
of these flatbreads than with the original pizza. Or is "pizza"
supposed to replace generic "flatbread"?

On the other hand, there are certainly pizzas made similarly enough to
the original that do deserve the name, the prime example being the New
York style pizza, which, if made traditionally and with traditional
ingredients, is very similar indeed to the original pizza, the main
difference being size - the New York pizza is often rather larger in
diameter.

Victor


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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

Roughrider50 wrote:

What would you then call a "DiGorno" frozen pizza or maybe a "red baron"
frozen pizza?


Never tried them... are they are any better than other frozen "pizzas"?
If not, I'd call 'em a perversion. That said, I do buy frozen "pizzas"
on occasion, I just do not expect them to be similar to real pizzas in
any way.

Victor
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Old 13-02-2007, 04:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.


"Victor Sack" wrote in message
. ..
Roughrider50 wrote:

What would you then call a "DiGorno" frozen pizza or maybe a "red baron"
frozen pizza?


Never tried them... are they are any better than other frozen "pizzas"?
If not, I'd call 'em a perversion. That said, I do buy frozen "pizzas"
on occasion, I just do not expect them to be similar to real pizzas in
any way.

Victor

I've heard of them being called a lot of things, but "perversion" is a new
one. Actually DiGorno isn't too bad for a frozen pizza. Its the only kind I
buy. Outside of costing a little more than the other frozen pizzas their
pretty close to what we get at pizza parlors here in town.


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Old 13-02-2007, 04:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 23:49:03 +0100, (Victor Sack) wrote:

Pizza is a very traditional dish, taken very seriously in Italy, and
making it in a non-traditional way renders it not a pizza. Here is how
traditional pizza is supposed to be made - it is all but impossible to
reproduce this at home, lacking a commercial-grade wood-fired oven.
http://www.pizzanapoletana.org/images/file/disciplinare_stg_eng.pdf.


No, it renders it not an official Neapolitan pizza. Period. It's just another EU
protected name and concept, like AOCs.

"The "Associazone Verace Pizza Napoletana" ("True Neapolitan Pizza
Association"), which was founded in 1984 and only recognises the Marinara and
Margherita, has set the very specific rules that must be followed for an
authentic Neapolitan pizza. These include that the pizza must be baked in a
wood-fired, domed oven at 485C for no more than 60 to 90 seconds; that the base
must be hand-kneaded and must not be rolled with a pin or prepared by any
mechanical means and that the pizza must not exceed 35 cm in diameter or be more
than a third of a cm thick at the centre."

Just as following all the rules but making it 36 cm. diameter would render it
not a Neapolitan pizza. No more, no less.

Or making other than a marinara or margherita pizza.

And we all know how *every* artisan in Europe is 100% behind all the new EU
regs, eh?

BTW, there's an awful lot of crap pizza in Naples these days. I'd say NYC is
more consistent, so long as you ignore any Chicago or deep-dish wanna-bes.

-- Larry
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Old 13-02-2007, 08:16 PM posted to alt.recipes,alt.food.recipes,rec.food.cooking,alt.bread.recipes,rec.food.baking
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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.

On Dec 16 2006, 10:39 am, "Pandora" wrote:
"John" ha scritto nel messaggionews:[email protected] com...

First, here are the results (broadband/DSL recommended):


http://i10.tinypic.com/2eklx6f.jpg


Gnam Gnam! It seems very good!

thank you for this pic!

--
Merry Christmas
Pandora
--------------------------------------





The pizza peel is also homemade. I made it from scrap wood and coated in
shellac. I have it for about 10 years.


Dough for a 13"-15" pizza


3/4 cups of water.
1/2 tsp yeast
1/2 tsp sugar (sucrose)
about 2 cups of KA white flour.


Add yeast and sugar to warm water to dissolve.


I use a cuisinart to knead the dough. The dough should be just slightly
sticky.


Let dough rise is a slightly oily pot for about and hour or two.


Preheat oven to 550 degrees with pizza stone in oven.


I use Tuttorosso crushed tomatoes with basil for the pizza sauce. I found
it a lot less expensive (about $1 per 28oz can) and much better tasting
than commerical "pizza" sauce.


I use Sargento mozzarella & provolone. Every now and then my supermarket
has them on sale for half price so I stock on them.


I roll the dough on a lightly dusted pizza peel. I measure the dough out
for my pizza stone; a 14" stone bought from Bed & Bath for $15. I wish I
still had my commercial oven where I used to make 20" pizzas.


Add a little oregano and or garlic powder to the top of the cheese.


Slide the pizza onto heated stone in oven.


Carefully watch the pizza. It can go from delicious to burned in a few
minutes. When the bottom the crust is slightly brown, I remove the pizza.


My pizza costs me about $2 to $3 and we greatly prefer it to the local
salty greasy "pizza". If we were in NYC, then that would be another
matter.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


damn that looks good!

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Default Easy home-made pizza (with picture). Eat your heart out.


damn that looks good!



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