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What can I do with yucca?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20-11-2004, 01:15 AM
krusty kritter
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Default What can I do with yucca?

I ate yucca once in Panama in the last century, I think it was fried, and maybe
the actual flavor came from the grease it was fried in, I dunno...

Another time I ate raw yucca flowers. They taste fishy like tuna...

I bought a can of "Yuca Entera" at the 99 Cents Only Store today...

The label says that the yucca has been already been boiled, and that I can
french fry the yucca after sprinkling it with lime juice...

What else can I do with yucca?

Adventurous gourmands want to know...


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-12-2004, 02:55 AM
Peter Dy
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Default


"krusty kritter" wrote in message
...
I ate yucca once in Panama in the last century, I think it was fried,



Yeah, I had fried yucca patties recently at a Dominican restaurant in NYC.
Search for "arepas de yuca" and you'll find some recipes. Or search "yucca
patties."

Peter



and maybe
the actual flavor came from the grease it was fried in, I dunno...

Another time I ate raw yucca flowers. They taste fishy like tuna...

I bought a can of "Yuca Entera" at the 99 Cents Only Store today...

The label says that the yucca has been already been boiled, and that I can
french fry the yucca after sprinkling it with lime juice...

What else can I do with yucca?

Adventurous gourmands want to know...


# * 0 * #
^






  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-12-2004, 02:55 AM
Peter Dy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"krusty kritter" wrote in message
...
I ate yucca once in Panama in the last century, I think it was fried,



Yeah, I had fried yucca patties recently at a Dominican restaurant in NYC.
Search for "arepas de yuca" and you'll find some recipes. Or search "yucca
patties."

Peter



and maybe
the actual flavor came from the grease it was fried in, I dunno...

Another time I ate raw yucca flowers. They taste fishy like tuna...

I bought a can of "Yuca Entera" at the 99 Cents Only Store today...

The label says that the yucca has been already been boiled, and that I can
french fry the yucca after sprinkling it with lime juice...

What else can I do with yucca?

Adventurous gourmands want to know...


# * 0 * #
^






  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-12-2004, 04:02 AM
krusty kritter
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

From: "Peter Dy"

Yeah, I had fried yucca patties recently at a Dominican restaurant in NYC.
Search for "arepas de yuca" and you'll find some recipes. Or search "yucca
patties."


Thanks, Peter. I found two recipes:

Cassava Preparation
makes 8 cups
2 lbs. fresh yucca root (cassava)
1 quart water
1 teaspoon salt

Peel the yucca root with a sharp knife or potato peeler. Cut the root into 2"
chunks and boil in water for about 20 or 30 minutes, until softened.Drain the
yucca and mash it with a fork. Then squeeze it dry with your hands, and use it
in soups, breads, et cetera. The yucca can be spread on a wooden board, covered
lightly with a cloth, and left to dry out overnight.

1 1/2 dozen patties
2 lbs. fresh yucca (cassava), peeled, grated, and squeezed dry
Moisten hands with water and form yucca into plum sized balls. Flatten with
palms of hands, or place yucca between two pieces of waxed paper and flatten
with the bottom of a heavy skillet. Make them very thin up to 1/2" in
thickness, according to to taste. Cook from 1 to 3 minutes per side, depending
on thickness, on a hot, ungreased griddle over high heat. Serve hot.
The Cassava can be kept at room temperature and will store indefinitely.


Yucca,also known as cassava or manioc in
English,is a starchy vegetable you can find in
any Hispanic market and many mainstream mar-
kets.In fact,you might even judge the quality of
a market by whether it carries yucca (just kid-
ding).Achiote is a spice found in the cuisines of
Mexico and Central America,and is readily
available in markets as well.
If you can remember to cook those yuccas the
day before,this dish takes just a little preparation
and cooks in a couple of minutes.
TORTITAS DE YUCA /YUCCA PATTIES
6 medium yucas,fresh or frozen
3 oz.Cream cheese,softened
2 eggs,lightly beaten
Salt
Achiote
1.Cook the yucas the day before preparing the
tortitas.If they are fresh,it should take about 30
minutes of simmering.If frozen,check after 30
minutes to see if they are soft.If not,leave for
another 15 minutes or so.The goal is to have
them soft all the way through.
2.The next day,grind the yuca to a soft dough.
Add the cheese,beaten eggs,salt and achiote.
Mix well and roll the dough on a floured surface;
cut into round tortitas (patties).
3.Fry them in hot vegetable oil until golden on
both sides.They can be served with a tomato or
avocado sauce.




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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-12-2004, 05:07 AM
Peter Dy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"krusty kritter" wrote in message
...
From: "Peter Dy"


Yeah, I had fried yucca patties recently at a Dominican restaurant in NYC.
Search for "arepas de yuca" and you'll find some recipes. Or search
"yucca
patties."


Thanks, Peter. I found two recipes:



There's also a great Filipino "dessert" made with cassava called bibingka.
I didn't mention it since it's from Asia, but maybe you'd be interested. (I
also forgot that yucca=cassava.) Here's one recipe, but there are lots of
others out there. I've never made it myself.

http://www.jsonline.com/entree/cooki...p?format=print

In Veracruz, Mexico last summer, I got something very similar at my favorite
bakery--a moist, slightly sweet square of what seemed like cassava. They
called it "budín." I just did a google search though, and it doesn't seem
like they have that in Mexico. They do have "budín de pan," which I guess
would translate to "bread pudding," so maybe that is what I got. This cute
young girl was working there at the time, and I asked her what it was made
of, and she made a face and said she didn't know, adding "No me gusta."
Haha. But my search also revealed that a regional version of cassava
bibingka in the Philippines goes by the name of budin! Wow, had no idea.
Looks like a good recipe (first link below). There are also Central
American budines made with cassava, but they're not sweet. It does give you
something to do with yucca instead of frying though. The second link is to
a Guatemalan recipe of cassava budín.

http://tinyurl.com/54qe5

http://expedition.bensenville.lib.il...udindeYuca.htm

Peter


 




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