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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Thin Sliced Ribeye



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 01:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As suspected,
the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was cooked
to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!





--
I made magic once. Now, the sofa is gone...
http://www.dwacon.com


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 01:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

"DWACON" wrote in message
news:xMyCf.24$c64.16@dukeread12...
The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected, the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more
flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!



Hotter pan, perhaps?


--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 04:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: n/a
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


DWACON wrote:
The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As suspected,
the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was cooked
to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!





--
I made magic once. Now, the sofa is gone...
http://www.dwacon.com



I tried it a few times with a well-scrubbed, well seasoned blackened
cast iron grill pan on the stovetop. I preheated the pan over high
heat as hot as possible with the range hood turned on w/o setting off
the smoke alarm and I still couldn't get the steak browned on the
outside w/o overcooking the interior. The meat was always at room
temperature when I started and I would have settled for anything under
medium well.

The preheated oven broiler was an even grreater failure. There's just
not enough thickness to keep it from overcooking on the inside once the
outside is seared.

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 04:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


daveyja writes:
I tried it a few times with a well-scrubbed, well seasoned blackened
cast iron grill pan on the stovetop. I preheated the pan over high
heat as hot as possible with the range hood turned on w/o setting off
the smoke alarm and I still couldn't get the steak browned on the
outside w/o overcooking the interior. The meat was always at room
temperature when I started and I would have settled for anything under
medium well.

The preheated oven broiler was an even grreater failure. There's just
not enough thickness to keep it from overcooking on the inside once the
outside is seared.


Definitely something wrong with your stove.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 07:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


wrote in message
oups.com...

I tried it a few times with a well-scrubbed, well seasoned blackened
cast iron grill pan on the stovetop. I preheated the pan over high
heat as hot as possible with the range hood turned on w/o setting off
the smoke alarm and I still couldn't get the steak browned on the
outside w/o overcooking the interior. The meat was always at room
temperature when I started and I would have settled for anything under
medium well.



Exactly what I did EXCEPT the steaks came directly out of the fridge
(floating in Guinness) so I figured the refrigeration would help. No such
luck, unfortunately.


--
The generation that used acid to escape reality
is now using antacid to deal with reality
http://www.dwacon.com


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 07:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

On Fri 27 Jan 2006 11:14:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it DWACON?


wrote in message
oups.com...

I tried it a few times with a well-scrubbed, well seasoned blackened
cast iron grill pan on the stovetop. I preheated the pan over high
heat as hot as possible with the range hood turned on w/o setting off
the smoke alarm and I still couldn't get the steak browned on the
outside w/o overcooking the interior. The meat was always at room
temperature when I started and I would have settled for anything under
medium well.



Exactly what I did EXCEPT the steaks came directly out of the fridge
(floating in Guinness) so I figured the refrigeration would help. No
such luck, unfortunately.


If it was dripping with Guinness when you put it in the pan, then your
culprit is at least partly moisure which would produce steam and prevent
browning. Meat going on a grill pan, skillet, or even outdoor grill should
have very dry surfaces in order to sear properly.

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 03:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
jay
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 681
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

On Fri, 27 Jan 2006 19:19:40 -0500, DWACON wrote:

The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As suspected,
the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was cooked
to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?


get it sliced about 1 1/2 inches.. or freeze it first.. duh...
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 03:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,668
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


"jay" wrote in message
news
On Fri, 27 Jan 2006 19:19:40 -0500, DWACON wrote:

The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected,
the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more
flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked
to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?


get it sliced about 1 1/2 inches.. or freeze it first.. duh...


What a little ray of sunshine you are jay!


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 06:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,780
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 00:47:59 GMT, Peter Aitken wrote:

"DWACON" wrote in message
news:xMyCf.24$c64.16@dukeread12...
The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected, the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more
flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!



Hotter pan, perhaps?


Perhaps, but 1/2 inch is thin. Sear one side only and serve seared
side up.
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,780
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

On 28 Jan 2006 07:24:02 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

If it was dripping with Guinness when you put it in the pan, then your
culprit is at least partly moisure which would produce steam and prevent
browning. Meat going on a grill pan, skillet, or even outdoor grill should
have very dry surfaces in order to sear properly.


bingo!
--

Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


"Wayne Boatwright" wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote in message
28.19...
On Fri 27 Jan 2006 11:14:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it DWACON?


wrote in message
oups.com...

I tried it a few times with a well-scrubbed, well seasoned blackened
cast iron grill pan on the stovetop. I preheated the pan over high
heat as hot as possible with the range hood turned on w/o setting off
the smoke alarm and I still couldn't get the steak browned on the
outside w/o overcooking the interior. The meat was always at room
temperature when I started and I would have settled for anything under
medium well.



Exactly what I did EXCEPT the steaks came directly out of the fridge
(floating in Guinness) so I figured the refrigeration would help. No
such luck, unfortunately.


If it was dripping with Guinness when you put it in the pan, then your
culprit is at least partly moisure which would produce steam and prevent
browning. Meat going on a grill pan, skillet, or even outdoor grill
should
have very dry surfaces in order to sear properly.



D-OHH !!!!



--
The generation that used acid to escape reality
is now using antacid to deal with reality
http://www.dwacon.com


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2006, 09:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,334
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


"DWACON" wrote in message
news:xMyCf.24$c64.16@dukeread12...
The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected, the size made the marinade soak through and it was much more
flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!



Ten seconds in a very hot wok.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 29-01-2006, 11:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,284
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

In article ,
"Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" wrote:

"DWACON" looking for trouble wrote in
news:xMyCf.24$c64.16@dukeread12:

The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected, the size made the marinade soak through and it was much
more flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!


Throw it on, and flip it a few seconds later, and yank it off. I'm talking
seconds here. I use rib eyes that thin as breakfast steak for steak and
eggs. I just pan sear them and serve 'em up with eggs and a side of
potatoes.

Michael


I got some of those last week. They are wonderful and were also on sale.

The trick is getting the pan as hot as possible.

I assume he was using Olive oil?
I started buying grapeseed oil specifically for steaks!

Heat the Cast Iron pan with grapeseed oil until the oil just starts to
smoke. Smoking GO oil is really hot! Make sure the marinated steaks are
at room temperature, and add any additional seasonings prior to cooking!
I use salt free lemon pepper and just a dash of garlic powder.

I use a pair of tongs to put them into the hot oil, then time for
exactly 1 minute per side. These steaks were about 3/4 inch thick.

They stay fairly rare on the inside and crispy dark brown on the
outside, and cut with a fork. ;-d Michaels "few seconds" might actually
be better as long as the outside of the steak is as brown as you want it.

Hope this helps?
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 29-01-2006, 11:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,284
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye

In article ,
sf wrote:

On 28 Jan 2006 07:24:02 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

If it was dripping with Guinness when you put it in the pan, then your
culprit is at least partly moisure which would produce steam and prevent
browning. Meat going on a grill pan, skillet, or even outdoor grill
should
have very dry surfaces in order to sear properly.


bingo!



Heh! Yeah.
When I "marinate" steaks for frying, I don't actually soak them.
I just use what marinade I want, (generally soy sauce, teryaki sauce,
and/or Hoisin sauce now that I've finally bought some) and sprinkle just
enough on the steak to cover it and let it soak in. I sort of sprinkle
it over it then rub it into the steak with my fingers. Additional dry
seasonings get sprinkled on top.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 30-01-2006, 03:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 57
Default Thin Sliced Ribeye


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 00:47:59 GMT, Peter Aitken wrote:

"DWACON" wrote in message
news:xMyCf.24$c64.16@dukeread12...
The local supermarket had some ribeye cut about ˝-inch thick. As
suspected, the size made the marinade soak through and it was much

more
flavorful.

The problem -- I wanted to sear the outside and being so thin it was
cooked to medium well (I was aiming for medium) before it could

brown.

Ideas on how to do it right next time?

Thanks!



Hotter pan, perhaps?


Perhaps, but 1/2 inch is thin. Sear one side only and serve seared
side up.


Around here, they are sold as sandwich ribeyes. Throw them on a hot grill
(outside), and cook them till the fat is mostly blackened. Put them between
the halves of a buttered and toasted bun along with a bit of salt and
pepper. No other flavorings needed.

Dave


 




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