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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Cooking noodles



 
 
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 10:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default Cooking noodles

"sf" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 21:19:21 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

wrote in message ...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"biig" wrote in message
...

When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried
should
I cook?....tia...Sharon

Depends on the noodles. Some retain their bulky shape more than others
(like
egg noodles, ziti), while others compact more (elbows). Experiment.

What kind of strange elbow macaroni do you use? They always expand
a little when I cook them.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.


Measure 2 cups of dry noodles, 3 different kinds: Egg noodles, elbows,
ziti.
Cook them. Measure their volume after cooking. Let me know what results
you
observe.

Yhe only thing you're observing is an over cooked noodle that compacts
under weight. Elbow noodles expand and will show it clearly when you
measure *if* they aren't cooked to death.


Yes, all pasta expands. But, that doesn't answer the question about how much
volume is occupied by many bits of pasta. This is a pretty intuitive thing,
if you think about it, AND if you understand what volume means.


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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 10:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default Cooking noodles

"Blair P. Houghton" wrote in message
...
cybercat wrote:
There is not a noodle on this planet that "compacts" after you cook it,
Joespare. Where do you get this stuff? lol


Lasagne take up less space when limp and wet than dry.

--Blair


Blair gets this concept. Blair wins 47 cases of his favorite beer.


  #18 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 12:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,083
Default Cooking noodles



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Oh pshaw, on Wed 13 Sep 2006 05:05:00a, Phred meant to say...

In article , biig wrote:

When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Let's see, in summary the answers to date include:

1 cup (Barb)

1.5 ounces dry gives about 1 cup cooked (Wayne)

A little over 2 cups (Dave)

At least 3/4 cup (-L)

Almost 2 cups (your own empirical results :-)

HTH -- But all those bloody experts have left me a tad confused! ;-)

Cheers, Phred.


It also will vary somewhat by the specific noodle being cooked. Also, the
typical flat egg noodle does not expand as much as most pasta types.

In the US, at least, packages list a serving or portion in dry ounces or
grams as well as the equivalent cooked volume measurement in cups.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Everything in our favor was against us.


Wow, I didn't think my question would get such different responses.
...lol.... As it turns out, I used medium egg noodles and I cooked 2
cups of dry that cooked up to a little over 2 cups when cooked al
dente. They compacted somewhat, but the casserole turned out fine. It
looked like I had a bit too much liquid in the dish when I assembled it,
but since I don't care for al dente noodles or pasta, it got taken up to
make the noodles the way I like them. DH approved......Sharon
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 01:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,107
Default Cooking noodles

In article , biig wrote:

When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Let's see, in summary the answers to date include:

1 cup (Barb)

1.5 ounces dry gives about 1 cup cooked (Wayne)

A little over 2 cups (Dave)

At least 3/4 cup (-L)

Almost 2 cups (your own empirical results :-)

HTH -- But all those bloody experts have left me a tad confused! ;-)

Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

  #20 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 01:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,620
Default Cooking noodles

Oh pshaw, on Wed 13 Sep 2006 05:05:00a, Phred meant to say...

In article , biig wrote:

When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Let's see, in summary the answers to date include:

1 cup (Barb)

1.5 ounces dry gives about 1 cup cooked (Wayne)

A little over 2 cups (Dave)

At least 3/4 cup (-L)

Almost 2 cups (your own empirical results :-)

HTH -- But all those bloody experts have left me a tad confused! ;-)

Cheers, Phred.


It also will vary somewhat by the specific noodle being cooked. Also, the
typical flat egg noodle does not expand as much as most pasta types.

In the US, at least, packages list a serving or portion in dry ounces or
grams as well as the equivalent cooked volume measurement in cups.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Everything in our favor was against us.

  #21 (permalink)  
Old 13-09-2006, 01:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,977
Default Cooking noodles

cybercat wrote:

Depends on the noodles. Some retain their bulky shape more than others

(like
egg noodles, ziti), while others compact more (elbows). Experiment.


There is not a noodle on this planet that "compacts" after you cook it,
Joespare. Where do you get this stuff? lol


I beg to differ. A bag of raw noodles has a lot of empty space in it because
the noodles are rigid. Once they are cooked they become limp and those spaces
disappear. They take up less space than before they were cooked.


  #24 (permalink)  
Old 14-09-2006, 01:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,861
Default Cooking noodles

sf wrote on 13 Sep 2006 in rec.food.cooking

On Wed, 13 Sep 2006 12:05:00 GMT, (Phred)
wrote:

In article , biig wrote:

When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried

should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Let's see, in summary the answers to date include:

1 cup (Barb)

1.5 ounces dry gives about 1 cup cooked (Wayne)

A little over 2 cups (Dave)

At least 3/4 cup (-L)

Almost 2 cups (your own empirical results :-)

HTH -- But all those bloody experts have left me a tad confused! ;-)

http://www.ilovepasta.org/faqs.html#Q10


See dry pasta or noodles don't fit well in a measuring cup. They stay the
shape they are, allowing all kinds of air gaps.

Now cooked pasta will conform to a measuring cup better, by readily
bending and collapsing on theirself. So you can fit more in the measuring
cup. Yes the noodles absorb some water and swell, but their soft limpness
defeats this when measured by cups. So some cooked pasta measured in a
measuring cup take up less space than when they were measured dry in the
same measuring cup.

Cups is a measurement of volume...space taken up. dry noodles generally
take up more space or volume. Cooked noodles less space or volume. Also
the longer the pasta sits in liquid the more it will absorb...Example:
leftover chicken noodle soup...put the soup in the fridge and the next
day the noodle will have absorbed a lot more liquid getting really soggy
and much larger.

Now to top this off... weight can also be measured in a unit of measure
called ounces. A cup is 8 fluid ounces, a pound is 16 ounces. But other
than the name, these measuring units have little relationship. As one
measures volume or space taken up and the other measure weight.

Think which weighs more; a pound of lead or a pound of feathers? Then
think which takes up more room; a cup of lead or a cup of feathers? The
answer to both questions is, of course, neither.

So cook 2-3 cups of dry noodles and then take the measured amount you
require from that...or guestimate ahead of time.

So it's more of an improper question than a solvable answer. Kinda like
asking if 2 cars leave Vancouver, which one will get to Capetown first.
Without other known factors like speed, route and method of travel...it
is not solvable.

So measure your dry pasta by weight (ounces) not volume (ounces). If
exactness is that important to you.



--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 17-09-2006, 04:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 82
Default Cooking noodles

On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 15:14:27 -0400, biig wrote:


When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Don't worry about it Just add some damn noodles.

I am always amazed at the anal retentive nature if the frequent
posters here. Don;t you EVER taste anything?
------------
There are no atheists in foxholes
or in Fenway Park in an extra inning
game.
____

Cape Cod Bob

Delete the two "spam"s for email
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 17-09-2006, 06:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default Cooking noodles

"Cape Cod Bob" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 15:14:27 -0400, biig wrote:


When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Don't worry about it Just add some damn noodles.

I am always amazed at the anal retentive nature if the frequent
posters here. Don;t you EVER taste anything?



Apparently, the idea of experimentation is illegal in many parts of the
world. It's a sad state of affairs.


  #27 (permalink)  
Old 17-09-2006, 07:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Cooking noodles


"Cape Cod Bob" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Sep 2006 15:14:27 -0400, biig wrote:


When a recipe calls for 2 cups cooked noodles, how much dried should
I cook?....tia...Sharon


Don't worry about it Just add some damn noodles.

I am always amazed at the anal retentive nature if the frequent
posters here.


I have to admit, I have had the same thought. I rarely measure anything,
which matters little in cooking, though it would be terrible for baking.
I chop, plop, and fling. I open boxes and jars and sprinkle, dump, and
dash. That said, it seems to be basic nature, whether we are precise
or not, and all along the spectrum between the two extremes. We
all get to be who we are, in this regard.


 




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