Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Default Etymology/orthography of Kung-fu/Gonfu tea

HI y'all--

China tea isn't *my* cup of tea, but I know some of you are very
interested in details relating to China tea...

Here is an article by a linguist of Chinese language about what the
"right" characters are to write "Gongfu tea." It is a very rich and
nicely documented discussion. It is also quite recently posted.

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3282#more-3282

Even if you decide you have gotten too much info in the main article
itself, I'd suggest you go read the comments-- the comments on the
languagelog site are always informed and substantial.

jhholland
geneva, ny
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Default Etymology/orthography of Kung-fu/Gonfu tea

I mentioned the Morrison directory previously. The original English
meaning was Congou as a tea grade from Wuyi mts only known to the
Chinese. Fortune in his 1848 travel memoir mentions small tea pots
for tea service but didnt give it a name. He discovered the Wuyi
source for black tea popular in England at the time. These were the
Chinese plants that essentially populated the Darjeeling tea area
which were later crossed with the initial Assam and Canton plants
which the British considered inferior.

Jim

PS Keep those links coming.

On Jul 20, 4:31 pm, Thitherflit > wrote:
> HI y'all--
>
> China tea isn't *my* cup of tea, but I know some of you are very
> interested in details relating to China tea...
>
> Here is an article by a linguist of Chinese language about what the
> "right" characters are to write "Gongfu tea." It is a very rich and
> nicely documented discussion. It is also quite recently posted.
>
> http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3282#more-3282
>
> Even if you decide you have gotten too much info in the main article
> itself, I'd suggest you go read the comments-- the comments on the
> languagelog site are always informed and substantial.
>
> jhholland
> geneva, ny


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