Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 29-10-2003, 01:32 PM
metaperson
 
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Default Tea and brain

Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?
And is tea really addictive?

Metaperson.




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Old 29-10-2003, 02:50 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default Tea and brain

/29/03

Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?



No, it sounds very nice.

Michael

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Old 30-10-2003, 12:12 AM
Zephyrus
 
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Default Tea and brain

Michael Plant wrote in message ...
/29/03

Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?



No, it sounds very nice.

Michael


Let me start by saying I am *not* qualified to discuss the chemistry
of the situation, and I'd love to be corrected by someone who knows
what they're talking about. This is what I've gathered from drinking
tea and tea books:

I often get light-headed after drinking much tea (sometimes to the
point of not being able to walk, after serious pu-erh gongfu). This
seems like the "euphoria" you describe, and it's very pleasent.
However, I don't concern myself too much about this: certain
polyphenols in tea work as relaxants (not depressants like alchohol,
mind you), and "euphoria" is probably a feeling of great relaxation
(very nice in modern society). This is why tea (esp. green, Oolong, or
decaffinated) can put you to sleep despite its caffine content.

On the other hand, it is possible (though unlikely) that your body
chemistry has a funky reaction to tea, as I've heard of some folks who
get drunk off of tea. Still probably not anything to worry about,
unless you operate heavy machinery. If you take medication, it's also
vaguely possible that tea could be reacting oddly with that (then
again, many things could). Your doctor would be the only one to ask if
you're hugely concerned. Again, these possibilites are really
unlikely.

The only thing I've ever heard of that could possibly be addicting in
tea is caffine, and considering all the caffinated things imbibed and
eaten in our culture, tea is pretty mild. Only pregnant or nursing
women or folks with high caffine sensitivity need worry about it. It's
really hard to get "coffee nerves" off of most teas, partly due to the
relaxing polyphenols and partly owing to the relitively low caffine
content.

I, personally, have to remind myself to drink tea. Doesn't feel overly
addicting. Some days, I accidently go without tea because I forget to
drink any.

Of course, why would it be bad to be addicted to tea? It's relitively
cheap and most of its health effects are beneficial. It's mentally
soothing, it soothes the throat and it relaxes the body. For someone
not overly caffine-sensitive, I can't think of any bad effects of tea.

Just some thoughts. I wouldn't worry.

ZBL
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Old 30-10-2003, 01:56 AM
Ennien
 
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Default Tea and brain

On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 15:32:24 +0300, "metaperson"
wrote:


Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?


Not at all. Tea has long been used to aid meditation and other
practices. Its a cornerstone of certain 'mystic' practices passed
down in my family, because it can have just such an effect.

Since the effect is very mild, during day to day drinking, when we're
concentrating on other things, its felt simply as a pleasant
relaxation. When tea is taken in a more ritualized setting, such as
during meditation or a tea ceremony, the effect is more easily
noticed.

And is tea really addictive?


Tea contains caffiene and caffiene is addictive.

Hope this helps
Is mise le meas
-==- Katzedecimal

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Old 30-10-2003, 05:35 AM
AK
 
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Default Tea and brain

In article , metaperson wrote:
Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?


Typical for drugs. Hence their popularity.

I get the opposite effect, though - I feel markedly "off" if I drink
even one cup of medium-strength tea on empty stomack. It's similar to
eating too much salty food (for me). Or too much refined sugar food.

I only drink tea after a meal.

And is tea really addictive?


Yes, but you should not be alarmed.. many things are addictive. I think
salt and sugar are. As far as addictive chemicals go, tea is the most
innocent one.

-AK

Metaperson.





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Old 30-10-2003, 10:35 PM
crymad
 
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Default Tea and brain



AK wrote:

In article , metaperson wrote:
Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?


Typical for drugs. Hence their popularity.

I get the opposite effect, though - I feel markedly "off" if I drink
even one cup of medium-strength tea on empty stomack. It's similar to
eating too much salty food (for me). Or too much refined sugar food.

I only drink tea after a meal.


Finer green teas like gyokuro are far to precious to spoil by drinking
them after my tastes have been dulled by a meal, I feel. I always drink
them alone, on an empty stomach, and think they taste best this way. If
I am also a little weary, say after a days work, then the tea can
produce that narcotic euphoria that AK speaks of. This isn't the
effects of caffeine, because lesser teas with similar caffeine content
fail to work such magic.

--crymad
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Old 03-11-2003, 05:45 AM
Shrewsbury
 
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Default Tea and brain

The Republic of Tea refers to this effect as "teamind".


-rebeccah
"metaperson" wrote in message
...
Hi, everyone!
Does anyone know exactly what effect tea has on brain?
I'm asking because I heard that tea is an addictive drug.
Of course, its effects may be weak, but sometimes after drinking quite a

lot
of tea I experience something strange... Euphoria, maybe... Or something
like mystical experiences.
Is it abnormal?
And is tea really addictive?

Metaperson.







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