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Old 11-04-2009, 11:32 PM
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Cilantro is an herb that people either love or hate, and I happen to
be one of those who hate it and thinks it tastes like soap.

I ate at a very expensive Indian restaurant last night and told the
waiter I didn't care for cilantro and requested that they hold the
cilantro on my lamb curry. So they made sure to dump cilantro on top
and I wasted half the curry trying to pick it out to make it edible.
Even then, the flavor was ruined every time I bit into a stray piece
and the vile taste overwhelmed my taste buds.

The retards at McDonalds are able to hold the pickle if the customer
requests it. Even Mexican taquerias will hold the chiles if you say
you like it mild. They could even put the cilantro on the side and
let the customer decide whether to put it in his taco or curry.

Vietnamese restaurants are another big offender when it comes to
cilantro. I can't even stand the thought of Vietnamese food anymore
because of it. My guess is that cilantro is traditionally used to
cover up the taste of spoiled meat.


Its not so bad.....
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Old 13-04-2009, 01:32 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

In article ,
wrote:
I ate at a very expensive Indian restaurant last night and told the
waiter I didn't care for cilantro


That's your mistake. I have met many Indians who don't know what you
mean when you say "cilantro." If you ask to leave out the cilantro,
they will assume what they put in is fine because they don't use
anything called cilantro in their food. To them, it's called
coriander. Cilantro is the Spanish name.

-A


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Old 13-04-2009, 05:48 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

On Apr 12, 5:32*pm, (axlq) wrote:

That's your mistake. I have met many Indians who don't know what you
mean when you say "cilantro." If you ask to leave out the cilantro,
they will assume what they put in is fine because they don't use
anything called cilantro in their food. *To them, it's called
coriander. Cilantro is the Spanish name.


His mistake??? That is really carrying the PC accommodating foreigners
bullshit too damn far. People open up a restaurant in an area and
they don't know the local food lingo? Not to mention, that cilantro is
a well known aka for coriander in culinary circles. No, it's the
restaurant's mistake.

I know the "customer is always right" is a joke nowadays, but no way
the OP is at fault. Geezus, go to an Italian place and you say no
mushrooms, and it's your fault because you didn't say no funghi...NO
WAY!

Ciccio
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Old 13-04-2009, 09:05 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

Ciccio wrote:

His mistake??? That is really carrying the PC accommodating foreigners
bullshit too damn far. People open up a restaurant in an area and
they don't know the local food lingo? Not to mention, that cilantro is
a well known aka for coriander in culinary circles. No, it's the
restaurant's mistake.


I know the "customer is always right" is a joke nowadays, but no way
the OP is at fault. Geezus, go to an Italian place and you say no
mushrooms, and it's your fault because you didn't say no funghi...NO
WAY!


The Voice of reason.

You got your ethnic restaurants that don't speak the local
majority language, and they do business at one level, and
then you got those that do, and they do business at a better level.
It all evens out. Parity.

Steve
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Old 15-04-2009, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

In article ,
Ciccio wrote:
On Apr 12, 5:32*pm, (axlq) wrote:
That's your mistake. I have met many Indians who don't know what you
mean when you say "cilantro." If you ask to leave out the cilantro,
they will assume what they put in is fine because they don't use
anything called cilantro in their food. *To them, it's called
coriander. Cilantro is the Spanish name.


His mistake??? That is really carrying the PC accommodating foreigners
bullshit too damn far. People open up a restaurant in an area and


Simmer down. I was being sarcastic, more or less.

Perhaps "mistake" wasn't appropriate, but the word in this context
has an interesting background:

Two weeks ago an Indian friend put on a baby shower for us. (My
function was to turn it into a wine tasting party to get rid of some
cases of wine that are getting a bit old, so I tended bar.) The
party attracted 45 guests, so we used the clubhouse at our condo
complex.

Anyway, she and another Indian guy were up late the night before
cooking, then on party day they took over our kitchen, finished
preparing all the food, and it was a glorious feast. I quail at
the thought of preparing an 8-course buffet for 45 people, but they
pulled it off. Most of it *wasn't* Indian cuisine, but some was,
and some was pre-prepared from a store.

Now, my Mom was there, too. She hates cilantro.

My Mom asked our friends which dishes had cilantro in them, and they
told her "none". They were using coriander in some dishes. My
Mom thought afterward that she was lied to until I explained that
Indians likely don't call it cilantro, and may not have known what
she meant, to which she responded "maybe that was my mistake."

The very next week, with her comment in mind, I posted the above
reply.

-A
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Old 27-04-2009, 01:22 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

On Apr 15, 1:25*pm, (axlq) wrote:

Simmer down. *I was being sarcastic, more or less.


Maybe you were. Yet, there are idiots who actually assert such
bullshit.

Two weeks ago an Indian friend put on a baby shower for us.
My Mom asked our friends which dishes had cilantro in them, and they
told her "none". *They were using coriander in some dishes. *My
Mom thought afterward that she was lied to until I explained that
Indians likely don't call it cilantro, and may not have known what
she meant, to which she responded "maybe that was my mistake."

The very next week, with her comment in mind, I posted the above
reply.


Hosts serving guests at at private baby shower is a big difference
from a professional restauranter serving paying patrons.

Though, in both instances, it is rather odd that nobody inquired
something like: "What is cilantro?" I mean jeez, if some Indian were
to ask me: "Is there dhanyia in the food?" Almost reflexively I'd
reply: "What is dhanyia?" Perhaps, it's part of Indian social mores
not to make such inquiries.

Ciccio


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Old 27-04-2009, 02:23 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

Ciccio wrote in message
...
[snippety do dah]
Perhaps, it's part of Indian social mores not to make
such inquiries.


Just say, "Perhaps it's part of Western European and US social mores to
reflexively ask, "What's that?" Many asian and Indian cultures wouldn't
think to make such an inquiry...

The Ranger


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Old 27-04-2009, 02:46 AM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

On Apr 26, 6:23*pm, "The Ranger" wrote:
Ciccio wrote in message


Just say, "Perhaps it's part of Western European and US social mores to
reflexively ask, "What's that?"


At the risk of sounding ethnocentric, then obviously our way is
better, since guests and patrons wouldn't get served what they
dislike. Unless, I'm missing the positive aspect of serving people
food they dislike or are allergic to.

Many asian and Indian cultures wouldn't think to make such an inquiry...


So, I was right, it is part of their social mores...Interesting.

Ciccio
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Old 02-05-2009, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.restaurants,ba.food,alt.food.asian
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Default Death to cilantro!

"The Ranger" writes:

Ciccio wrote in message
...
[snippety do dah]
Perhaps, it's part of Indian social mores not to make
such inquiries.


Just say, "Perhaps it's part of Western European and US social mores to
reflexively ask, "What's that?" Many asian and Indian cultures wouldn't
think to make such an inquiry...


Hm... this is news to me.

rsi


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