General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 08:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,209
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?

I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the starting
point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above, for
almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 08:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/031...lance&n=283155

or

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/031...Fencoding=UTF8

or

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159...lance&n=283155

or

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/067...lance&n=283155
but you already said that

or

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/076...lance&n=283155
"Kent" wrote in message
. ..
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one
must search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks ,
and I almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975
edition, before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's
still the starting point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook".
Next, depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella
Hazan,'s books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's
books["Cooking School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"].
Only after the above, for almost everything else, do I open any of
the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the
last 5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent




  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 08:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?


"Kent" wrote in message
. ..
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the
starting point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above,
for almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent



For anything dessert-wise, any book by Maida Heatter.

-Scott


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 09:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 842
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?


Kent wrote:
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent


Well, I don't have any favorites published in the last 5-10 years. I
tend to use my mom's recipe books she got back in the 60's. They're a
series of recipe books called "Favorite Recipes of Home Economics
Teachers" published by Favorite Recipes Press. There's a volume on
desserts, one for meats, one for salads, one for vegetables, one for
foreign foods, one for casseroles and breads, and one for quick and
easy dishes. Each volume is at least 350 pages and has several recipes
on each page. The only pictures are at the beginning of each chapter,
and they're all in black and white. There are no pictures on the pages
with the actual recipes.

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3,523
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?


BbqGuy wrote:
[bunch of links]


The classics mentioned already in other replies are inarguable. Of the
current crop of writers I most often recommend Mark Bittman's books.
"How To Cook Everything" is a modern Joy of Cooking in its broad
educational value. "The Best Recipes in the World" (or something close
to that) is both a fine collection of recipes and again has a lot of
useful info and techniques. The Minimalist books give you good food
without fuss while imparting very useful general principles. -aem



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 11:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,984
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "TheWay to Cook"?

Kent wrote:
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the starting
point, 300 cookbooks later.


Amen! My first cookbook (same edition). I sat and read it like a novel
and still consider it "the source"
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 11:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 35,884
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way toCook"?

Kent wrote:

I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the starting
point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above, for
almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,


I have found some good recipes in various sources, cook books, on line,
magazines and newspapers. Some of the most interesting have been from
magazines. Most cook books have all sorts of recipes that I have no use for and
are pretty much a waste of time. If I could have only one cook book it would
have to be the Joy of Cooking. It has more useful recipes and more tips than
any other I have seen.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 11:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 731
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "TheWay to Cook"?

Kent wrote:
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the starting
point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above, for
almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent



My first reference is always to Stephanie Alexander's encyclopaedic
"Cook's Companion", now in its second edition. Can't think how I managed
without it. Well, actually I can, I used other books, which I still
refer to. Marcella Hazan is wonderful. I have Jane Grigson's "Fruit
Book" and "Vegetable Book". I have just about everything Beverley
Sutherland Smith ever published, and Charmaine Solomon's "Complete
Vegetarian Cookbook".

In recent years I have had a lot of use out of various books by Jill
Dupleix, whose recipes are in the style you might call elegant simplicity.

I confess that I do not own anything by Delia Smith or Margaret Fulton
(her Australian counterpart).

Many of my cookbooks are more used as reference works, you can tell by
the lack of stains on the pages! In this category I put various books by
Rose Levy Berenbaum, Barbara Kafka and Claudia Roden (whose "Book of
Jewish Food" is a great read). And of course the greatest reference work
of all, which is not a cookbook, is Harold McGee's mighty "On Food and
Cooking".

These days I rarely buy cookbooks of the instructional manual sort. My
latest purchase has been "The Kitchen Diaries" by Nigel Slater, which is
one of those discursive books with the recipes integrated into the
narrative, a style pioneered by the immortals Elizabeth David and M F K
Fisher.

Christine
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2006, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?


"Dave Smith" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:

I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the
starting
point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above,
for
almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,


I have found some good recipes in various sources, cook books, on line,
magazines and newspapers. Some of the most interesting have been from
magazines. Most cook books have all sorts of recipes that I have no use
for and
are pretty much a waste of time. If I could have only one cook book it
would
have to be the Joy of Cooking. It has more useful recipes and more tips
than
any other I have seen.




"In Nonna's Kitchen", by Carol Field. The author wandered around Italy,
interviewing grandmothers and collecting recipes that might be lost in one
or two generations. No pictures of the food, just the grandmothers.
Fantastic book.

"Vegetables", by James Peterson


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2006, 12:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?

"Old Mother Ashby" wrote in message
...
Kent wrote:
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else. This never ceases to amaze me. It's still the
starting point, 300 cookbooks later.
Following that it's almost always Julia Child;s "The Way to Cook". Next,
depending on what I'm wanting to cook, are any of Marcella Hazan,'s
books["Classic Italian Cooking], any of Michael Field's books["Cooking
School", "Culinary Classics and Improvisations"]. Only after the above,
for almost everything else, do I open any of the remaining 290 books.
What are your favorites? Especially newer favorites published in the last
5-10 years.
Many thanks for any advice,
Kent



My first reference is always to Stephanie Alexander's encyclopaedic
"Cook's Companion", now in its second edition. Can't think how I managed
without it. Well, actually I can, I used other books, which I still refer
to. Marcella Hazan is wonderful. I have Jane Grigson's "Fruit Book" and
"Vegetable Book". I have just about everything Beverley Sutherland Smith
ever published, and Charmaine Solomon's "Complete Vegetarian Cookbook".

In recent years I have had a lot of use out of various books by Jill
Dupleix, whose recipes are in the style you might call elegant simplicity.

I confess that I do not own anything by Delia Smith or Margaret Fulton
(her Australian counterpart).

Many of my cookbooks are more used as reference works, you can tell by the
lack of stains on the pages! In this category I put various books by Rose
Levy Berenbaum, Barbara Kafka and Claudia Roden (whose "Book of Jewish
Food" is a great read). And of course the greatest reference work of all,
which is not a cookbook, is Harold McGee's mighty "On Food and Cooking".

These days I rarely buy cookbooks of the instructional manual sort. My
latest purchase has been "The Kitchen Diaries" by Nigel Slater, which is
one of those discursive books with the recipes integrated into the
narrative, a style pioneered by the immortals Elizabeth David and M F K
Fisher.

Christine


Another vote for Marcella Hazan. "Marcella Cucina" is a great book. She
cooks and writes like a normal person, not a celebrity. The recipes leave
lots of room for improvisation. No exclusive & trendy ingredients that one
must order from some overpriced boutique in Manhattan.




  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2006, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,675
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "TheWay to Cook"?

Kent wrote:
I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe



What cookbook do you open when you want to find a particular recipe and
what are your favorite cookbooks are two different questions. Like you,
I reach for Joy of Cooking when I know I want to make souffle (for
example) and need to know basic recipe and technique, but there are lots
of other reasons for a cookbook to become a favorite.


After Joy, the next book I use a lot for basic information is The
Victory Garden Cookbook by Marian Morash. Sometimes I just need to know
what to do with a vegetable, and she always has the answer plus useful
tables along the lines of how many pounds equals how much grated.


I like the Silver Palate cookbooks and the old Mollie Katzen and
Moosewood cookbooks. I don't feel like getting up and going to the
other room to get the titles right, but I like the ethnic cookbooks so I
can make an authentic Greek recipe or a Thai one. I like those to have
lots of pictures and sometimes just look at the pictures.


--Lia

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2006, 10:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,215
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?

Besides the obvious listed above, there is one I found by
accident......"Never Trust a Skinny Cook" by Arlene Conant.

She states flat out that when she got married she didn't have a clue...then
proceeded to find one (sort of like Julia). Plain food, uses some canned
items, but it is a good way to start out with minimal failure.

-Ginny


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2006, 02:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 130
Default What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"?

On Sun, 4 Jun 2006 12:38:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

I'm sure this has been asked many times before, but now and then one must
search for what is new, and what people think.
When I want to find a recipe I sit in front of our 300+ cookbooks , and I
almost always reach for the Rombauers' "Joy of Cooking", 1975 edition,
before anything else.


Me too (1964 edition). My paperback copy is in three sections now, and
most of the pages are food-stained.

Jo Anne



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Irrational Search for Micrograms (of Animal Parts) proves that"veganism" isn't about so-called "factory farms" at all Rudy Canoza[_8_] Vegan 0 19-08-2016 06:04 PM
"Bien cuit" ("cook it until it's done") Christopher M.[_5_] General Cooking 0 28-07-2013 05:05 PM
BLIMPS REJOICE! "Grilled" At KFC Means You Can Gobble More Pieces OfChicken Than The Original "Boogies On A Bone" Fried Artery-Cloggers! Lil' Barb Barbecue 4 18-05-2009 11:22 PM
FDA says "no" in Tomato connection to reduced cancer risk: From "Sham vs. Wham: The Health Insider" D. Vegan 0 11-07-2007 05:29 PM
+ Asian Food Experts: Source for "Silver Needle" or "Rat Tail" Noodles? + Chris General Cooking 1 29-12-2006 07:13 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:15 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017