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Kent
 
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Default Another standing rib question

Do any of you have a routine for warming up standing rib that
works?[maintaning moisture, degree of rare, taste, etc].
The two of us can only consume a small fraction of a three rib roast. It
would be nice to have the same dinner all over again, instead of having to
resort to sandwiches, hot beefs, stroganoff, etc. All of that is a pretty
dismal way to consume a very expensive cut of beef.
I have warmed up a standing rib beginning at room temp., in foil, very
slowly at an oven temp. of 175F to the old rare temp of 120. This works,
more or less, though obviously quite a lot is lacking.
Have any of you tried a microwave to do the same thing?? It should work.
Wrapping it, or covering it with saran, and warming very slowly on the
defrost power level, after bringing the roast to room temp. should work???
Has anyone tried this, or any other method.
Thanks to all,
Kent


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nancree
 
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Default Another standing rib question

First of all, slice the beef and allow it to sit out and come to room
temperature. This will not cause any effects from "cooking". If you
have any gravy, heat it very hot, and pour over the beef. If not, heat
it in small increments,covered, in the microwave, let it sit, test the
temp. I wouldn't put it in the oven--I think you can control it better
in the microwave.

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Reg
 
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Default Another standing rib question

Kent wrote:

> Do any of you have a routine for warming up standing rib that
> works?[maintaning moisture, degree of rare, taste, etc].
> The two of us can only consume a small fraction of a three rib roast. It
> would be nice to have the same dinner all over again, instead of having to
> resort to sandwiches, hot beefs, stroganoff, etc. All of that is a pretty
> dismal way to consume a very expensive cut of beef.
> I have warmed up a standing rib beginning at room temp., in foil, very
> slowly at an oven temp. of 175F to the old rare temp of 120. This works,
> more or less, though obviously quite a lot is lacking.
> Have any of you tried a microwave to do the same thing?? It should work.
> Wrapping it, or covering it with saran, and warming very slowly on the
> defrost power level, after bringing the roast to room temp. should work???
> Has anyone tried this, or any other method.



If absolutely I want to keep cooking it to a minimum, I
wrap in lettuce leaves and nuke it until it's just warm
enough. I find this is the best way to minimize cooking
but still rewarm it.

If I'm no so concerned about extra cooking, I gently
warm it in gravy or jus.

--
Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com

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fudge
 
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Default Another standing rib question

I have seen restaurants use this method and it works. There is very little
difference between right out of the oven prime rib and this method. Place a
normal portion on a microwavable plate with about a tablespoon of water.
Cover with saran wrap and nuke. I don't know the correct amount of time so
start low and work up. Give it a try.

Farmer John




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Kent
 
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Default Another standing rib question

That's just what I was on the verge of doing when I wrote the post to ask
for advice.
For a 4lb, small end, leftover roast how long would you nuc., and at what
power level? Like almost everyone in this NG, I have to have it pink.
Thanks
Kent

"fudge" > wrote in message
. ..
> I have seen restaurants use this method and it works. There is very
> little difference between right out of the oven prime rib and this method.
> Place a normal portion on a microwavable plate with about a tablespoon of
> water. Cover with saran wrap and nuke. I don't know the correct amount of
> time so start low and work up. Give it a try.
>
> Farmer John
>
>
>
>





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Reg
 
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Default Another standing rib question

Kent wrote:

> That's just what I was on the verge of doing when I wrote the post to ask
> for advice.
> For a 4lb, small end, leftover roast how long would you nuc., and at what
> power level? Like almost everyone in this NG, I have to have it pink.
> Thanks
> Kent
>
> "fudge" > wrote in message
> . ..
>
>> I have seen restaurants use this method and it works. There is very
>>little difference between right out of the oven prime rib and this method.
>>Place a normal portion on a microwavable plate with about a tablespoon of
>>water. Cover with saran wrap and nuke. I don't know the correct amount of
>>time so start low and work up. Give it a try.



Kent, I'd advise that you only attempt this with portion sizes,
not the whole 4 lb roast at once.

--
Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com

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