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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
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D.Currie
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
freezing?

Thanks!

--
Donna


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Carol Garbo
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question (Donna)

Do not cook them first. Line a large cookie sheet with waxed paper.
Lay the pierogi on it (about 1" apart); place in freezer until solidly
frozen; transfer to Zip-Loc bags & store in the freezer; no need to thaw
before cooking. Carol

Our life may not always be the party we would have chosen, but while we
are here, we may as well dance!

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D.Currie
 
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"Carol Garbo" > wrote in message
...
> Do not cook them first. Line a large cookie sheet with waxed paper.
> Lay the pierogi on it (about 1" apart); place in freezer until solidly
> frozen; transfer to Zip-Loc bags & store in the freezer; no need to thaw
> before cooking. Carol
>


Thanks! Should I let the dry out a bit before I freeze them, or freeze them
right after they're made?

Donna


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Carol Garbo
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question (Donna)

Freeze them as soon as they are made; you don't want them dried out.
Once they are solidly frozen, you can easily peel them from the waxed
paper. Carol

Our life may not always be the party we would have chosen, but while we
are here, we may as well dance!

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Dave Smith
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

"D.Currie" wrote:

> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> freezing?


The people I know who make their own pergogies cook them, toss them in butter
and then freeze them in flat packages so they are frozen in layers instead of
in huge clumps.




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D.Currie
 
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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> "D.Currie" wrote:
>
>> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do
>> you
>> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
>> freezing?

>
> The people I know who make their own pergogies cook them, toss them in
> butter
> and then freeze them in flat packages so they are frozen in layers instead
> of
> in huge clumps.
>
>


Ah, another opinion. Sounds like I could go either way, then. I've got a
vacuum sealer, so I could freeze them in a layer in bags, boil the bags to
thaw/heat them, and then fry them if that was the plan.

I was thinking that freezing them uncooked might give more chance that
they'd crack and then leak when I boil them later. But I wasn't sure.

Thanks for the response.

Donna


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

In article >,
"D.Currie" > wrote:

> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> freezing?
>
> Thanks!


Hi, Donna -- I boil, mix/toss gently in the butter-and-sauteed-onion
mix, bag by the half dozen, seal (I use a bag sealer), and freeze.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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Puester
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

D.Currie wrote:
> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> freezing?
>
> Thanks!
>



It really doesn't matter as long as you make them hexagonal.

;-)
gloria p


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D.Currie
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question


"Puester" > wrote in message
news
> D.Currie wrote:
>> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do
>> you boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them
>> for freezing?
>>
>> Thanks!
>>

>
>
> It really doesn't matter as long as you make them hexagonal.
>
> ;-)
> gloria p

Well, if we don't stop gobbling them down, there will be nothing left to
freeze anyway.

:-p

Donna


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D.Currie
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question


"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "D.Currie" > wrote:
>
>> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do
>> you
>> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
>> freezing?
>>
>> Thanks!

>
> Hi, Donna -- I boil, mix/toss gently in the butter-and-sauteed-onion
> mix, bag by the half dozen, seal (I use a bag sealer), and freeze.
> --
> http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05


I was thinking that boiling would be the way to go, but I think I'll skip
butter and onion. We usually brown ours lightly in butter before serving, so
I can add the onion then with no problem -- unless you put the butter there
to keep them from sticking together?

Sigh. I've got this week off from work, and I was going to spend some "me"
time curled up reading a book or something. But most of the books I've been
looking at have been cookbooks, and that just gets me started...next thing
you know I'm spending all day in the kitchen. But it's soooo much fun.

Donna


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

In article
>,
Puester > wrote:

> D.Currie wrote:
> > When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
> > boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> > freezing?
> >
> > Thanks!
> >

>
>
> It really doesn't matter as long as you make them hexagonal.
>
> ;-)
> gloria p


Heretic. PTP. Proper Triangular Pirohy. Only.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

In article >,
"D.Currie" > wrote:

> "Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "D.Currie" > wrote:
> >
> >> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do
> >> you
> >> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> >> freezing?
> >>
> >> Thanks!

> >
> > Hi, Donna -- I boil, mix/toss gently in the butter-and-sauteed-onion
> > mix, bag by the half dozen, seal (I use a bag sealer), and freeze.
> > --
> > http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05

>
> I was thinking that boiling would be the way to go, but I think I'll skip
> butter and onion. We usually brown ours lightly in butter before serving, so
> I can add the onion then with no problem -- unless you put the butter there
> to keep them from sticking together?


Bingo.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

In article >,
"D.Currie" > wrote:

> "Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "D.Currie" > wrote:
> >
> >> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do
> >> you
> >> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> >> freezing?
> >>
> >> Thanks!

> >
> > Hi, Donna -- I boil, mix/toss gently in the butter-and-sauteed-onion
> > mix, bag by the half dozen, seal (I use a bag sealer), and freeze.
> > --
> > http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05

>
> I was thinking that boiling would be the way to go, but I think I'll skip
> butter and onion. We usually brown ours lightly in butter before serving, so
> I can add the onion then with no problem -- unless you put the butter there
> to keep them from sticking together?


When you toss with butter and onion before freezing, they don't stick
together, plus your browning butter is already there. Thaw and fry 'em
up. Same with the onion part of it - it's already there.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

D.Currie wrote:
> When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do you
> boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you package them for
> freezing?
>
> Thanks!
>

Up here there are comercial perogies availible in grocery stores or
also made and sold by church groups to raise money....They are frozen
prior to being sold. Sold in pkges of 1 dozen. 12 frozen perogies frozen
into 1 big lump in their plastic bag. So either the boiled with butter
or prefrozen on waxed paper has it's merits.

I eat mine just boiled with butter, sauted onions, bacon bits and sour
cream. When my kids were living at home I'd have to boil a mess of them
3 dozen or so. Then pan fry some (my Daughter) and deep fry some (my
Son). They all settled for the condiments I previously mentioned (
except no butter)
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don Gray?

> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>
>> D.Currie wrote:
>> > When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them?
>> > Do you boil them first, or freeze them uncooked? And how do you
>> > package them for freezing?
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>> >

>> Up here there are comercial perogies availible in grocery stores or
>> also made and sold by church groups to raise money....They are frozen
>> prior to being sold. Sold in pkges of 1 dozen. 12 frozen perogies
>> frozen into 1 big lump in their plastic bag. So either the boiled with
>> butter or prefrozen on waxed paper has it's merits.
>>
>> I eat mine just boiled with butter, sauted onions, bacon bits and sour
>> cream. When my kids were living at home I'd have to boil a mess of them
>> 3 dozen or so. Then pan fry some (my Daughter) and deep fry some (my
>> Son). They all settled for the condiments I previously mentioned (
>> except no butter)

>
> I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of P*******s
> until I came across them in this group. See I can't even write the word,
> for I see here different spellings and don't know which to use. I'm
> still not much the wiser except that I came across them once up in just
> one of my hundreds of cookery books.
>
> It's not unusual that location and tradition moulds our tastes. However,
> unless we visit a foreign country and try its foods; or are lucky enough
> to find an ethnic restaurant which serves a selection of its country of
> origins foods, we never have the chance to try them. I have never seen,
> let alone entered a Russian, Polish, Swedish, Danish, etc, etc east
> european restaurant so have no idea what they serve.
>
> The odd thing is that I have entered and eaten in Italian, French, Dutch
> (but recently). Many visits to Indian, Pakistani, Chinese and Thai but
> so few from my own European continent!! I can't bear the thought of
> eating raw fish from a Japanese one, so I've missed out on one Asian
> influence ;-)
>
> Don
>


Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families from
eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either in whole
or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish, Slovak,
Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many crossover
dishes that have either slightly or completely different names, but are
very similar.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don Gray?
>
>> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>>
>>> D.Currie wrote:

>
> Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families from
> eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either in whole
> or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish, Slovak,
> Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many crossover
> dishes that have either slightly or completely different names, but are
> very similar.
>


What Wayne said plus each younger generation takes liberties with the
food or messes with the ingredients. Example perogies started out being
cooked as just boiled. And these days French Fried is the usual way
you'll find them in restaraunts.


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Don Gray > wrote:
> > D.Currie wrote:
> > > When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze them? Do

(snip)
>
> I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of P*******s
> until I came across them in this group. See I can't even write the word, for
> I see here different spellings and don't know which to use. I'm still not
> much the wiser except that I came across them once up in just one of my
> hundreds of cookery books.


Don, think Eastern European ravioli (Italian but better known, perhaps).
A filled noodle dough (as opposed to a yeast dough or another type bread
dough). Pierogi is the Polish word for them, pirohy is the Slovak word
(we're neighbors on the Continent, doncha know; in some parts of Ukraine
they are called varenyky. You will only hear me refer to them as pirohy
because I am a nice Slovak girl, purebred. Dobru' chut'!
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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Mr Libido Incognito
 
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Don Gray wrote:
> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>
>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>>> On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don Gray?
>>>
>>>> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> D.Currie wrote:
>>> Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families from
>>> eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either in whole
>>> or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish, Slovak,
>>> Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many crossover
>>> dishes that have either slightly or completely different names, but are
>>> very similar.
>>>

>> What Wayne said plus each younger generation takes liberties with the food
>> or messes with the ingredients. Example perogies started out being cooked
>> as just boiled. And these days French Fried is the usual way you'll find
>> them in restaraunts.

>
> I appreciate that and I also make amendments according to mood, taste or
> present company. I'm just trying to work out what to do with the pierogies.
> Are they eaten on their own as a snack. Or are they considered as part of a
> greater meal and if so what are the accompaniments. I sure can think of a
> bucketful of ideas but I'd rather play with some ideas which are tried and
> tested.
>
> Thanks
>
> Don

Well these days they are both a stand alone meal or part of a large
Feast/holiday spread...Teenager's will eat them for lunch or as a
sidedish with supper...So consider them a type of sidedish.
Traditionally they were plain boiled but not mostly deep fried. Fillings
range from cheese and potato to fruit even some have meat inside. Sour
cream is required eating with all of them...the butter, crumbled bacon
and sauted onions are also options for some types.
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Ian MacLure
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

Melba's Jammin' > wrote in
:

> In article >,
> Don Gray > wrote:
>> > D.Currie wrote:
>> > > When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze
>> > > them? Do

> (snip)
>>
>> I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of
>> P*******s until I came across them in this group. See I can't even
>> write the word, for I see here different spellings and don't know
>> which to use. I'm still not much the wiser except that I came across
>> them once up in just one of my hundreds of cookery books.

>
> Don, think Eastern European ravioli (Italian but better known,
> perhaps). A filled noodle dough (as opposed to a yeast dough or
> another type bread dough). Pierogi is the Polish word for them,
> pirohy is the Slovak word (we're neighbors on the Continent, doncha
> know; in some parts of Ukraine they are called varenyky. You will
> only hear me refer to them as pirohy because I am a nice Slovak girl,
> purebred. Dobru' chut'!


Filled pasta dumplings of whatever sort are thought ( I recently
learned ) to have originated in Anatolia ( Turkey ). There they are
called something like "mentu". In Korea they are called "Mandu".
This is not thought to be a coincidence.
Puts the Babylon 5 lizard guy's comment about Swedish Meatballs
in some sort of perspective.

__________________________________________________ _____________________________
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 31 Dec 2005 09:59:39a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Mr Libido
Incognito?

> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don

Gray?
>>
>>> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>>>
>>>> D.Currie wrote:

>>
>> Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families

from
>> eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either in

whole
>> or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish, Slovak,
>> Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many crossover
>> dishes that have either slightly or completely different names, but are
>> very similar.
>>

>
> What Wayne said plus each younger generation takes liberties with the
> food or messes with the ingredients. Example perogies started out being
> cooked as just boiled. And these days French Fried is the usual way
> you'll find them in restaraunts.


I didn't think about that, Alan, but you're right. When we lived in
Cleveland we used to go to a restaurant called "The Pierogi Palace". They
had a huge variety of both traditional and non-traditional fillings, and
would prepared them just boiled, or with browned butter and onion, or deep
fried. It was a fun place to go.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

On Sat 31 Dec 2005 03:38:10p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don Gray?

> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>
>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> > On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don
>> > Gray?
>> >
>> > > In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>> > >
>> > > > D.Currie wrote:
>> >
>> > Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families
>> > from eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either
>> > in whole or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish,
>> > Slovak, Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many
>> > crossover dishes that have either slightly or completely different
>> > names, but are very similar.
>> >

>>
>> What Wayne said plus each younger generation takes liberties with the
>> food or messes with the ingredients. Example perogies started out being
>> cooked as just boiled. And these days French Fried is the usual way
>> you'll find them in restaraunts.

>
> I appreciate that and I also make amendments according to mood, taste or
> present company. I'm just trying to work out what to do with the
> pierogies. Are they eaten on their own as a snack. Or are they
> considered as part of a greater meal and if so what are the
> accompaniments. I sure can think of a bucketful of ideas but I'd rather
> play with some ideas which are tried and tested.


IME, in many homes they are served as the main course, often preceded by a
soup and accompanied by a salad or marinated cucumbers. Pierogies made for
a common meatless Friday meal or Lenten meal for many Catholics. Some
folks serve them along with kielbasa for a meat meal.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 31 Dec 2005 03:31:12p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Mr Libido
Incognito?

> Don Gray wrote:
>> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>>
>>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>>>> On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don
>>>> Gray?
>>>>
>>>>> In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> D.Currie wrote:
>>>> Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families
>>>> from eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either
>>>> in whole or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish,
>>>> Slovak, Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many
>>>> crossover dishes that have either slightly or completely different
>>>> names, but are very similar.
>>>>
>>> What Wayne said plus each younger generation takes liberties with the
>>> food or messes with the ingredients. Example perogies started out
>>> being cooked as just boiled. And these days French Fried is the usual
>>> way you'll find them in restaraunts.

>>
>> I appreciate that and I also make amendments according to mood, taste
>> or present company. I'm just trying to work out what to do with the
>> pierogies. Are they eaten on their own as a snack. Or are they
>> considered as part of a greater meal and if so what are the
>> accompaniments. I sure can think of a bucketful of ideas but I'd rather
>> play with some ideas which are tried and tested.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Don

> Well these days they are both a stand alone meal or part of a large
> Feast/holiday spread...Teenager's will eat them for lunch or as a
> sidedish with supper...So consider them a type of sidedish.
> Traditionally they were plain boiled but not mostly deep fried. Fillings
> range from cheese and potato to fruit even some have meat inside. Sour
> cream is required eating with all of them...the butter, crumbled bacon
> and sauted onions are also options for some types.


Depending on where you serve them, sour cream is not a given, but browned
butter is.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 31 Dec 2005 03:30:47p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don Gray?

> In message Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
>
>> On Sat 31 Dec 2005 01:29:40a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Don
>> Gray?
>>
>> > In message Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>> >
>> >> Up here there are comercial perogies availible in grocery stores or
>> >> also made and sold by church groups to raise money....They are
>> >> frozen prior to being sold. Sold in pkges of 1 dozen. 12 frozen
>> >> perogies frozen into 1 big lump in their plastic bag. So either the
>> >> boiled with butter or prefrozen on waxed paper has it's merits.
>> >>
>> >> I eat mine just boiled with butter, sauted onions, bacon bits and
>> >> sour cream. When my kids were living at home I'd have to boil a mess
>> >> of them 3 dozen or so. Then pan fry some (my Daughter) and deep fry
>> >> some (my Son). They all settled for the condiments I previously
>> >> mentioned ( except no butter)
>> >
>> > I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of
>> > P*******s until I came across them in this group. See I can't even
>> > write the word, for I see here different spellings and don't know
>> > which to use. I'm still not much the wiser except that I came across
>> > them once up in just one of my hundreds of cookery books.
>> >
>> > Don

>>
>> Growing up in Cleveland, OH where there were many immigrant families
>> from eastern Europe, it was easy to find restaurants that were either
>> in whole or in part ethnic in their cuisine. Typical were Polish,
>> Slovak, Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, German, etc. There are many
>> crossover dishes that have either slightly or completely different
>> names, but are very similar.
>>

> Whoops, apologies all round. Just got the book out and realised that the
> name was 'Pirozhki', little stuffed packages, deep fried. Or maybe they
> are a variation of the same thing? I don't know, but they sure look
> tasty ;-)
>
> We intend travelling around Eastern Europe as soon as we've had our fill
> of The Netherlands and Germany. There's just not enough time to take it
> all in.


IIRC, Don, Pirozhki is the Russian version of similar dishes of many
nationalities. I believe Pirozhki are almost always filled with meat
and/or mushrooms. Victor Sack could tell you about that.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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Dave Smith
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

>
> Depending on where you serve them, sour cream is not a given, but browned
> butter is.


It must depend on where you are. The people I know who make perogies always
serve them wit sour cream. I don't remember ever seeing them serve them with
browned butter. I like to fry up some onion in butter until it is browned, but
I am not a perogie maker, nor am I from the ethnic groups that make those
things.

I was spoiled the first time I had perogies. I was visiting a friend whose
mother had just made a huge batch of perogies, and she had made them with a
variety of fillings. Some were just cheese, some had fried onion and the best
bunch had sauerkraut.

  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Don Gray > wrote:

> In message Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>
> > Don Gray > wrote:
> > > > D.Currie wrote:
> > >
> > > I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of P*******s
> > > until I came across them in this group. See I can't even write the word,
> > > for I see here different spellings and don't know which to use. I'm still
> > > not much the wiser except that I came across them once up in just one of
> > > my hundreds of cookery books.

> >
> > Don, think Eastern European ravioli (Italian but better known, perhaps).
> > A filled noodle dough (as opposed to a yeast dough or another type bread
> > dough). Pierogi is the Polish word for them, pirohy is the Slovak word
> > (we're neighbors on the Continent, doncha know; in some parts of Ukraine
> > they are called varenyky. You will only hear me refer to them as pirohy
> > because I am a nice Slovak girl, purebred. Dobru' chut'!

>
> Ah, now I gotya. It sounds just up my street. It's a bit of a devil sometimes
> sitting back and hearing about "local delicacies", then realising that they
> are actually traditional foods from our side of the pond.
>
> I've never had the opportunity to travel around some parts of Europe,
> particularly those which were under the influence of Russia but will be doing
> in the future, now that we're based in Belgium.
>
> Thanks for the help on the linguistic front. It's surprising how ignorant we
> can be about other people's customs and foods. I would guess that there are
> quite a few similarities between English and Slovak foods, seeing as we live
> in similar cold climates.
>
> I'm going to try pirohies


Not pirohies. Pirohy IS plural. Please get it right.
Not many similarities between English and Slovak food that I've seen.
The Slovak food is flavorful. "-)

Many cultures have similar foods -- most, I think, have a flat bread;
several have filled noodle-dough dumpling things; I know there are more,
but they're not coming to mind right now,

I've posted my recipes for pirohy dough and fillings more than once
here. If you google on that spelling, you're likely to turn up my
recipes. They're pretty good. The key is that you make them in the
only true and proper shape: triangular.

Where "my people" are (still) located was once ruled by the Hungarians.
My family lives in the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains a bit north
of Humenne, Slovakia. VERY near the Polish border. The Poles there eat
similar foods - spelled different. Cabbage rolls (golabki/holubky),
pierogi/pirohy; others, too. Borders are political boundaries. :-)
Potatoes taste like potatoes. Cousin Maria has a hand with yeast dough
that I can only dream of. And she's cute, besides! Made her first
flight on an airplane at age 68 in 2000 to visit her American cousins.
Told her husband, who thought she was too old for it, "If I can climb
the ladder to get snow off the roof, I can get on a plane to go to
America." Go, Maria!
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Ian MacLure > wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' > wrote in
> :
>
> > In article >,
> > Don Gray > wrote:
> >> > D.Currie wrote:
> >> > > When you make the batches of pierogi, what do you do to freeze
> >> > > them? Do

> > (snip)
> >>
> >> I suppose that it sounds strange but I'd never even heard of
> >> P*******s until I came across them in this group. See I can't even
> >> write the word, for I see here different spellings and don't know
> >> which to use. I'm still not much the wiser except that I came across
> >> them once up in just one of my hundreds of cookery books.

> >
> > Don, think Eastern European ravioli (Italian but better known,
> > perhaps). A filled noodle dough (as opposed to a yeast dough or
> > another type bread dough). Pierogi is the Polish word for them,
> > pirohy is the Slovak word (we're neighbors on the Continent, doncha
> > know; in some parts of Ukraine they are called varenyky. You will
> > only hear me refer to them as pirohy because I am a nice Slovak girl,
> > purebred. Dobru' chut'!

>
> Filled pasta dumplings of whatever sort are thought ( I recently
> learned ) to have originated in Anatolia ( Turkey ). There they are
> called something like "mentu". In Korea they are called "Mandu".
> This is not thought to be a coincidence.
> Puts the Babylon 5 lizard guy's comment about Swedish Meatballs
> in some sort of perspective.


The Tibetans have momo. I visited a castle in Eastern Slovakia where
the Turks had been long time ago. And the Vikings were in what's now
the Czech Republic -- all those blonde Czechs came from somewhere,
doncha know. :-)
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Don Gray > wrote:

> Whoops, apologies all round. Just got the book out and realised that the name
> was 'Pirozhki', little stuffed packages, deep fried. Or maybe they are a
> variation of the same thing? I don't know, but they sure look tasty ;-)
>
> We intend travelling around Eastern Europe as soon as we've had our fill of
> The Netherlands and Germany. There's just not enough time to take it all in.
>
> Don


Oh, dear. Where's Bubba Vic! Pirozhki are a yeast dough, I believe.
Not a noodle dough. Pelmeni are like pirohy. When you get around to
Eastern Europe, visit the Vysoky Tatry (High Tatra mountains). Keep
going east and they become the Nizhny (near) Tatry, I think. Then the
Carpathian mountains. God's country. My parents were born there.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Don Gray > wrote:

> I appreciate that and I also make amendments according to mood, taste or
> present company. I'm just trying to work out what to do with the pierogies.
> Are they eaten on their own as a snack. Or are they considered as part of a
> greater meal and if so what are the accompaniments. I sure can think of a
> bucketful of ideas but I'd rather play with some ideas which are tried and
> tested.
>
> Thanks
>
> Don


Don, pirohy are peasant food. Or were. Cheap to make!! Abundant on
meatless Fridays for the Catholics back when, and for the Eastern
Orthodox. Belly-filling. Not a snack. Maybe a side for meat, but we
usually ate them as the meal in and of themselves. Lots of them. I can
put away a dozen without blinking. Mom would make dozens, we would eat
dozens. Fried a bit next morning for breakfast if any were leftover.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
Don Gray > wrote:

> In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
> > In article Don Gray > wrote:
> >
> > > Thanks for the help on the linguistic front. It's surprising how ignorant
> > > we can be about other people's customs and foods. I would guess that
> > > there are quite a few similarities between English and Slovak foods,
> > > seeing as we live in similar cold climates.
> > >
> > > I'm going to try pirohies

> >
> > Not pirohies. Pirohy IS plural. Please get it right. Not many
> > similarities between English and Slovak food that I've seen. The Slovak
> > food is flavorful. "-)

>
> Sorry about incorrect grammar.


It's not a hanging offense. "-)



> I told you that I had never seen it in print
> so I had to guess. So what's the singular then?


The Polish is, I believe, pierog. And the Slovak is, (I'm guessing)
piroh. Be sure to roll the r.

Where the heck is Bubba Vic? He knows everything!
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-22-05
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D.Currie
 
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"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Don Gray > wrote:
>
>> In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>>
>> > In article Don Gray > wrote:
>> >
>> > > Thanks for the help on the linguistic front. It's surprising how
>> > > ignorant
>> > > we can be about other people's customs and foods. I would guess that
>> > > there are quite a few similarities between English and Slovak foods,
>> > > seeing as we live in similar cold climates.
>> > >
>> > > I'm going to try pirohies
>> >
>> > Not pirohies. Pirohy IS plural. Please get it right. Not many
>> > similarities between English and Slovak food that I've seen. The
>> > Slovak
>> > food is flavorful. "-)

>>
>> Sorry about incorrect grammar.

>
> It's not a hanging offense. "-)
>
>
>
>> I told you that I had never seen it in print
>> so I had to guess. So what's the singular then?

>
> The Polish is, I believe, pierog. And the Slovak is, (I'm guessing)
> piroh. Be sure to roll the r.
>


Seems to me there is no such thing as a singular pierogi. You gotta make a
lot of 'em and no way you're going to eat just one!

:-)

Donna


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Victor Sack
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question

Melba's Jammin' > wrote:

> The Polish is, I believe, pierog. And the Slovak is, (I'm guessing)
> piroh. Be sure to roll the r.


Right-o!

> Where the heck is Bubba Vic?


Right here.

> He knows everything!


That goes without saying, ain't it?

The thing to remember about pierogi, pirohy, pelmeni, vareniki,
koldunai, etc. is that all of 'em are supposed to be half-moon shaped
*and* boiled, never fried, unless they are leftovers (is there such a
thing as pierogi leftovers, anyway?). The Lithuanian koldunai are an
exception, since they are sometimes fried and *then* boiled. If you
want fried dumplings, consider the Armenian boraki, Georgian chebureki,
Azerbaijani dushbara or kurze, Tajik kushan, Chinese kao-tse, Korean
gun-mandu, or Japanese age-gyoza.

To answer the OP's question, all of the above are to be frozen raw -
interestingly enough, the taste even improves as a result. Preparing -
no matter how - frozen cooked pierogi or some such is too gruesome an
idea to contemplate.

For recipes, both savoury and sweet, traditional and non-traditional,
here is yet another repost. Note that pierogi are the same thing as the
Russian and Ukranian pelmeni and vareniki. Ignore Barb's heretical
attempts to defile the noble recipe by using such an evil contraption as
a food processor. Ignore also her apostate triangular ushki corruption
of the glorious half-moon shape of the true
pierogi/pirohy/pelmeni/vareniki/koldunai. Keep in mind that, whenever
mushrooms are called for, they are *real* wild mushrooms, such as
ceps/porcini, not the bland, blah button mushrooms, portobella, etc.

For the dough:

1 1/2 lb flour
2 1/2 cups water (some or all of the water can be replaced with milk if
desired)
3 eggs
salt

______________

For meat filling:

3/4 lb beef, finely minced
3/4 lb pork, finely minced
(Lamb or mutton can either be substituted for either beef or
pork, or added to both. Other meats, such as game, can be used,
too. The best pelmeni invariably contain at least two different
kinds of meat. Also, it is ideally preferable to mince meat by
hand - it will be juicier that way.)
1 egg
4-5 cloves of garlic
a bit of minced fresh cabbage (this doesn't add anything to the taste,
but makes pelmeni incredibly juicy; if it's too juicy for you,
reduce the amount of cabbage or leave it out altogether)
salt
pepper
(I've also seen non-traditional recipes adding a bit of freshly grated
ginger)
7-8 cups salted water (or, better still, chicken or beef broth) for
cooking.

Mix together the ingredients for the filling and season with salt and
pepper. To make the dough, mix flour, eggs, and salt together in a
mixing bowl, then add water gradually. Knead until springy. Let the
flour rest in the refrigerator for a half hour or so. Roll out the
dough very thinly (ideally, it should be almost transparent) and cut
into circles with a thin glass of about 2.5 inch in diameter (but the
size is up to you). Put about a teaspoon of the meat mixture in the
centre of each circle, fold in half and seal the edges firmly together
to form a half moon. (If you want a fancier form, fold again, bringing
together the ends of the semi-circle, pinching them to hold them in
place). Repeat until the filling and the dough are used up. Pelmeni
are ready to be cooked at this point, unless you want to freeze them. In
the latter case, they should be put on the floured board, not touching
each other, and placed in the freezer. Once frozen, they can be put
into plastic bags and kept for months.

To cook pelmeni, whether fresh or frozen, bring the water or broth to
the boil in a large pot and drop in the pelmeni.
Bring to the boil
again and boil until they rise to the top. Take them
out quickly with a
perforated spoon and put in a colander for a few
moments to drain the
excess water.

(Pelmeni can also be fried or baked, but this is not traditional. To
prepare fried ones, first boil them for two or three minutes, as
described above, then take out and drain. Fry them in hot butter in a
pan until golden brown. To prepare baked pelmeni, first boil them until
not quite ready, then take out and drain them and arrange them in a pan.
Pour over sour cream, or tomato- or cheese sauce and bake in the oven
until ready).

Serve pelmeni with butter, or sour cream, or sour cream laced with
garlic, or with diluted vinegar, or mustard, or mustard sauce - or,
indeed, with any sauce, whether spicy or not, you deem suitable. They
can be sprinkled with fresh dill or parsley and with grated cheese. They
can also be served in a beef or chicken broth or soup.

______________

Pelmeni filled with feta cheese and baked in an
omelette:

400 g (14 ounces) feta cheese
100 g (3.5 ounces) butter
2 garlic cloves
5 eggs
1/2 cup milk
2 tablespoons flour
salt

Put feta in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Let stand until the
water is cool. Put the feta through the grinder together with garlic
and mix well with softened butter. Form and fill pelmeni and boil them.
Heat some fat in a in a large high-sided frying pan. Arrange the boiled
hot pelmeni in the pan and fry on all sides. Beat a mixture of eggs,
milk and flour and pour over the pelmeni. Bake until the omelette is
ready.

______________

Chicken filling:

1 boned medium-sized chicken
1 cup milk (or cream)
salt, spices to taste

Put the chicken through the grinder twice, salt, and add milk or cream.
Mix everything well together. The filling shouldn't be too thin.

______________

Radish filling (white radish or daikon):

600 g (1.3 pounds) radish
1 onion, finely minced
1.5 cup sour cream
salt, spices to taste

Coarsely grate the radish (it would perhaps be a good idea to soak the
radish before grating in salted water for some time and then add a bit
of vinegar to the soaking liquid), add onions, sour cream and spices.
Mix everything well together. Serve these pelmeni with some vegetable
oil.

______________

Sauerkraut or fresh cabbage filling:

4 cups sauerkraut or 1 kg (2.2 pounds) fresh cabbage
2-3 onions
1 carrot
1 parsley root
1.5 tablespoon tomato purée
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
1-2 teaspoons sugar
6-7 black peppercorns

Mince sauerkraut or cabbage finely and cook it a bit in 1 tablespoon
oil. Separately fry minced carrot, onions and parsley root. Add them
to the sauerkraut/cabbage together with tomato purée, salt, pepper and
sugar. Cook a bit more to let some of the liquid evaporate. These
pelmeni are served with onions fried in oil, with the oil poured over
pelmeni.

______________

Mushroom filling:

500 g (1.1 pounds) fresh mushrooms
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 onion, finely minced
2 eggs
salt, pepper

Clean, wash, dry and finely mince the mushrooms. Fry the onions in a
mix of oil and butter until translucent. Add the mushrooms and fry over
high heat for a few minutes. Reduce heat and continue cooking for about
20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Salt and pepper. Meanwhile, boil
the eggs, peel and chop finely and add them to the mushrooms. Mix well.
Serve these pelmeni with sour cream or melted butter.

______________

Beans and mushroom filling:

1 cup beans (e.g. white, broad, or Boston beans)
2-3 tablespoons lard
2-3 onions, finely minced
100 g (3.5 ounces) dried mushrooms
red pepper, salt to taste

Cook the beans and, when ready, purée them. Fry onions fried in lard.
Boil the mushrooms. Mix all of the above well together with red pepper
and salt.

______________

Vareniki with farmer's cheese filling:

20 oz Farmer's cheese
1-2 tablespoon sour cream
1-2 eggs
1 tablespoon sugar
a pinch of salt

Mix everything very well until it combines into a uniform elastic mass.

______________

Vareniki with sour cherry filling (roll out thicker
dough for this filling):

2 1/2 lb sour cherries
1 1/2 cup sugar

Pit the cherries, reserving the stones, put in a non-reactive dish.
Sprinkle with sugar and leave in a sunny place for 2-3 hours or longer.
Pour off the juice, reserving it. Fill vareniki with the cherries, i.e.
put about a teaspoon of cherries in the centre of each dough circle,
fold in half and seal the edges firmly together to form a half moon.

Crush 5-7 cherry stones roughly and put them together with the rest of
the stones in a non-reactive dish. Add about 3/4 cup water and boil for
a couple of minutes. Strain the liquid, add sugar and let it boil
again. Take from the heat, let cool and mix with the cherry juice.
Serve with vareniki.

______________

Vareniki with apple filling:

1 kg (2.2 pounds) very ripe, soft apples, peeled and cored
3/4 cup sugar

Julienne the apples, sprinkle with sugar, mix well and let stand for 15
minutes. These vareniki are served with honey.

______________

Vareniki with poppy seed filling:

1.5 cup poppy seeds
1/2 cup sugar
1 teaspoon honey

Cover the poppy seeds with boiling water and let stand 15 minutes. Drain
and dry the seeds on kitchen towels until they are quite dry. Pound them
in a mortar. Add sugar and honey and continue to pound until everything
combines into a uniform mass. Important: as soon as each of these
vareniki is formed, it should be boiled at once, otherwise they tend to
fall apart.

Bubba Vic


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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
(Victor Sack) wrote:

> Melba's Jammin' > wrote:
>
> > The Polish is, I believe, pierog. And the Slovak is, (I'm guessing)
> > piroh. Be sure to roll the r.

>
> Right-o!
>
> > Where the heck is Bubba Vic?

>
> Right here.
>
> > He knows everything!

>
> That goes without saying, ain't it?
>
> The thing to remember about pierogi, pirohy, pelmeni, vareniki,
> koldunai, etc. is that all of 'em are supposed to be half-moon shaped


Bite me, baby boy!

> To answer the OP's question, all of the above are to be frozen raw -
> interestingly enough, the taste even improves as a result. Preparing -
> no matter how - frozen cooked pierogi or some such is too gruesome an
> idea to contemplate.


Sez you. I'll freeze some raw next time out and see how they cook up,
but you're full of pickled beet juice to suggest that preparing (read
heating) frozen cooked pirohy is a chore. Bull tweety!

> here is yet another repost. Note that pierogi are the same thing as the
> Russian and Ukranian pelmeni and vareniki. Ignore Barb's heretical
> attempts to defile the noble recipe by using such an evil contraption as
> a food processor. Ignore also her apostate triangular ushki corruption
> of the glorious half-moon shape of the true
> pierogi/pirohy/pelmeni/vareniki/koldunai.


Sez you, Bubba! Sez you!

> For the dough:
>
> 1 1/2 lb flour
> 2 1/2 cups water (some or all of the water can be replaced with milk if
> desired)
> 3 eggs
> salt


Have you ever actually made them, Bubba Vic? A nice young Slovak girl
taught me to add a small bit of boiled potato to the dough mixture.
I've done it ever since. And there's nothing, got it, nothing wrong
with using a food processor for mixing the dough. It's called progress.
Pfftthhgggbbtt!
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Melba's Jammin'
 
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In article >,
"D.Currie" > wrote:
(snippage)

> >> I told you that I had never seen it in print
> >> so I had to guess. So what's the singular then?

> > The Polish is, I believe, pierog. And the Slovak is, (I'm guessing)
> > piroh. Be sure to roll the r.


> Seems to me there is no such thing as a singular pierogi. You gotta make a
> lot of 'em and no way you're going to eat just one!


> :-)
>
> Donna


Oh I agree about the last part of your statement, Donna. I can easily
put away a dozen in a sitting. More if I'm hungry.
--
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  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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Default Ping: Parb -- Pierogi question


"Victor Sack" > wrote

> The thing to remember about pierogi, pirohy, pelmeni, vareniki,
> koldunai, etc. is that all of 'em are supposed to be half-moon shaped


Huh ... I thought they were supposed to be triangle shaped.

nancy


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Mon 02 Jan 2006 04:37:46p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Nancy Young?

>
> "Victor Sack" > wrote
>
>> The thing to remember about pierogi, pirohy, pelmeni, vareniki,
>> koldunai, etc. is that all of 'em are supposed to be half-moon shaped

>
> Huh ... I thought they were supposed to be triangle shaped.


I think the best shape is the one you decide to make.

There is no "official" shape, despite what Barb says.

AND, they taste the same, in any case.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
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