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Old 05-07-2005, 04:39 PM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bagna Cauda [anchovies & garlic sauce]

Hello group.
As promised, here is the recipe for the Bagna Cauda,
kindly provided by my boyfriend Davide.

Pandora.


-----------------------------------------

BAGNA CAUDA [literal: "Warm Sauce"]
by Davide Pastore, 2005


Pronunciation: something like "Baa?ah Kaawdah", where the "?"
stands for the peculiar letter group "gn" that has a totally
different sound in English (where you will pronounce it as it
were two well-separate letters g+n) than in Italian (where it
has a single, smooth sound, vaguely similar to the noise of
a fast passing car along a highway: "GGGNnnnnnn...."). If you
are familiar with French you probably already know how to
pronounce "Bagna", otherwise I'm at loss to explain it.



PHILOSOPHICAL PREFACE

Bagna Cauda (abbreviated as "BC" thereafter) is one of the
typical Piedmontese dishes. It is considered the "dish of
friendship", basically because you really can't stand the
proximity of a BC-eating folk if you are not a VERY good
friend of him! By the same token, you usually can't stand
being at the same table with BC-eating people if you don't
taste it (you need the first mouthful of BC to overcome
the garlic scent). It is usually a dinner dish, late in the
evening.



INGREDIENTS

1) Anchovies (I use the ones preserved in oil, although 99%
of the recipes require salted ones)

2) Garlic

3) Some kind of Fat, could be either: Olive Oil and/or Butter
and/or Milk and/or Cream, according to different schools of
thoughts. I use 50% oil and 50% butter. I will not recommend
Seed Oil or other fatty stuff, but you can experiment.

4) A LOT of assorted vegetables.



QUANTITIES

Anchovies and garlic - in the same weight, or about 3oz.-4oz.
[100g] of each for person for a full-size preparation (i.e. a
single dish, full-meal). You will obtain about enough BC to
fill a cup. For a first experiment, just-for-the-taste-of-it,
better to try with just 1oz. [25g] anchovies plus 1oz. [25g]
garlic, per person.

[note: real addicted people here require much more]

Oil etc. - "at least" the same weight as anchovies or garlic,
i.e. 3oz.-4 oz. [100g] for king-size, and 1oz. [25g] for first
tentative; "not more than" twice that quantity (i.e. 6oz.-8oz.
[200g] or 2oz. [50g]), per person. Exact weight is a matter of
fine alchemy and individual taste (see preparation below).

[note: if you want to use salted anchovies, you will need
somewhat more oil]

Vegetables - a lot, in the region of 1lb-2lb [500g-1kg] per
person. See below for details.



INITIAL PREPARATION

ANCHOVIES - the ones preserved in oil require really little
work: just open the can.

On the other hand, the salted ones require ACCURATE washing.
You need to totally eliminate any trace whatsoever of salt,
which will have soaked the anchovies. Wash, wash, wash, and
then wash a little more (and they will taste salted anyway).

If the anchovies come with their bones, these of course
have to be accurately eliminated as well.

[note: the traditional recipe requires salted anchovies for
the simple reason that a couple of centuries ago there was
no way of preserving them, short of salt]


GARLIC - eliminate the external skin of each clove, then cut
the clove in two in the "long" sense. You will note the
presence of an internal "anima" ("soul") somewhat separated
from the pulp (and maybe green-coloured, if the garlic is
a bit too old). Eliminate it, since it has a bitter taste,
leaves a "bad mouth" for days thereafter, and is difficult
to digest.

Cut and/or crush the remaining part of the cloves in little
pieces, then put them into a dish/cup/bowl and cover them
with milk. The scope of this action is "smoothing" the taste
of the garlic. Leave in the milk bath for some time (the
more the better! At the very least, a couple of hours) then
throw away the liquid. Don't add this liquid in the cooking
bowl, since by now its taste will be sour.

[note: this milk is in addition to the quantity of milk/
/oil/butter/cream listed above]


VEGETABLES - You don't exactly "eat" BC, you actually eat
the vegetables dipped into it. You can dip just anything,
we mainly use:

- red or yellow peppers, raw (or roasted over the fire,
according to taste), sliced.
- cauliflower, boiled, cut to pieces.
- potatoes, boiled, de-skinned and cut to pieces.
- cardoons (eliminate the hardest parts and put the softer
"heart" parts into a bowl, under water and a little lemon
juice).
- topinanbur (I really don't know how this ones are called
in English. In the first picture listed below they are the
yellowish-brown funny things in the foreground, on the
centre-right).
- salad, lettuce, cabbage, radish, etc.

and any other dippable, commestible thing that strikes your
fancy, including of course bread (you will strongly need
bread in the last phase, when you will feel a strong urge
to clean your dish from any remaining atom of BC).

[note: a typical local hors d'oeuvre is sliced roasted
peppers with a little BC over them. And try it on chips!]



COOKING

The scent of the cooking will inevitably permeate your
kitchen for some days thereafter. You will probably NOT
note it the morning after, but any guy who didn't have
previously tasted BC will!!! Maybe you want to do the
cooking outdoor, if you can (and maybe have the entire
meal outdoor, like a barbecue).

BC should be cooked only in its typical pottery bowl
called "Diān" (prn. "Deeaan!"), with its characteristic
chocolate-brown exterior. I don't know if it can be found
in your country: it's a kind of little frying pan about
8in [20cm] diameter and 2in [5cm] high, in a single piece
with its pottery panhandle. Any sort of pottery bowl able
to stand the fire will do; as a last resort, try a metal
one, but I do nor guarantee the result (pottery has an
altogether different way of transmitting heat).

Put "a little" oil/butter in the bowl and start the fire.
Keep the fire VERY low!! When the oil is warm and/or the
butter is liquid, add the anchovies and the pieces of garlic.

From this time, the cooking is a matter of EYE! You will
stir constantly, never stopping, with your WOODEN spoon,
breaking and amalgamating anchovies and garlic with the
frying oil/butter/milk/cream, poured in the bowl little
by little as required. You need to obtain a soft, dense,
smooth, HOMOGENEOUS cream: too little oil and it will burn
(same if fire is too hot), too much oil and the result will
be a "hot oil soup", with some islands of BC sadly floating
into a sea of fat - not a very pleasant sight. Add oil
any time the sauce seems to "dry", and stir for some time
before adding it again.

Remember, you need a dense sauce, not a liquid soup.

[note: if something went wrong, and in the end there is
an obvious lake of oil inside your bowl, better eliminate
it with a spoon before serving in table]

At some time during the stirring (say, after 10-20 minutes
of cooking) you will note that the colour of the BC
(initially anchovy-brown) will more or less suddenly turn
to grey. This indicates that the cooking is done, and the
bowl can be served in table.



ON TABLE

BC has to be tasted hot or at least very warm, period.

It is served in ad-hoc pottery structures that contains
an upper floor for the sauce, and a lover floor for a
candle to keep it warm (see pictures). If you can't find
them, put at least a candle fire on the table under the
main bowl, and serve in each dish just a little hot BC
each time.

The vegetables will be distributed in the middle of the
table, for everyone to choose what he likes and dip it
into his own dish. In case of DEEP friendship or REAL
love amongst guests, you can eliminate the intermediate
step and just dip things all together into the main bowl!!



WINE

A strong Piedmontese dish, BC requires a strong
Piedmontese red wine. The choice is restricted to:

- Barbera
- Dolcetto
- Nebbiolo (or Nebiolo)

Barbera is usually the first choice, being the "normal",
"common" (and cheapest, and a bit "rude") wine here.
Dolcetto is somewhat more noble (and a bit more costly);
Nebbiolo is nobler and costlier still. Since the strong
garlic presence will by and large mask anything else, it
is useless to use a more precious wine than these three.

[note: the exceptionally good Barolo is actually made
with the very same Nebbiolo grapevine. However, it can
be called Barolo only if it grows in a very restricted
geographical zone. So, 99% of people will probably not
find much difference between a 100$ Barolo bottle and
a 10$ Nebbiolo bottle]



PICTURES

I have found on the Web these pictures, to give some idea
of the final result:
http://www.regione.piemonte.it/agri/...frutta/bcauda/
http://www.piemonte-online.com/cucin...bagnacauda.htm
http://www.mangiarebene.com/accademi...gna_cauda.html
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ricett...ricetta_dove=3

I have also found another BC recipe in English:
www.italianmade.com/recipes/recipe75.cfm


Buon Appetito! (have a good meal!)

Davide






  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-07-2005, 09:00 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pandora wrote:

Hello group.
As promised, here is the recipe for the Bagna Cauda,
kindly provided by my boyfriend Davide.

Pandora.

-----------------------------------------

BAGNA CAUDA [literal: "Warm Sauce"]
by Davide Pastore, 2005

Pronunciation: something like "Baa?ah Kaawdah", where the "?"


bah-nya cow-dah

stands for the peculiar letter group "gn" that has a totally
different sound in English (where you will pronounce it as it
were two well-separate letters g+n) than in Italian (where it
has a single, smooth sound, vaguely similar to the noise of
a fast passing car along a highway: "GGGNnnnnnn....").


This is a funny comparison. I can see adults standing on the side of a
road trying to make that noise...

If you
are familiar with French you probably already know how to
pronounce "Bagna", otherwise I'm at loss to explain it.

PHILOSOPHICAL PREFACE

Bagna Cauda (abbreviated as "BC" thereafter) is one of the
typical Piedmontese dishes.


From where my grandparents came. It was a monthly dinner with us for
decades. Over time, they adapted it to the vegetables most readily
available where we lived in New Jersey. They also extended what went
with it and how to eat it.

It is considered the "dish of
friendship", basically because you really can't stand the
proximity of a BC-eating folk if you are not a VERY good
friend of him! By the same token, you usually can't stand
being at the same table with BC-eating people if you don't
taste it (you need the first mouthful of BC to overcome
the garlic scent). It is usually a dinner dish, late in the
evening.


The ceremony of eating it is in the spirit of a fondue.

INGREDIENTS

1) Anchovies (I use the ones preserved in oil, although 99%
of the recipes require salted ones)


Traditionally, salted anchovies were a condiment in their own right and
seen as a salt substitute with an extra little flavor element.

2) Garlic

3) Some kind of Fat, could be either: Olive Oil and/or Butter
and/or Milk and/or Cream, according to different schools of
thoughts. I use 50% oil and 50% butter. I will not recommend
Seed Oil or other fatty stuff, but you can experiment.


50-50 butter and a milder olive oil in our house. We found all butter or
all oil not flavored in as balanced a way. Some of our relatives use
cream in theirs, but I find it a bit too bland. Just my tastes, though.

4) A LOT of assorted vegetables.

QUANTITIES

Anchovies and garlic - in the same weight, or about 3oz.-4oz.
[100g] of each for person for a full-size preparation (i.e. a
single dish, full-meal). You will obtain about enough BC to
fill a cup. For a first experiment, just-for-the-taste-of-it,
better to try with just 1oz. [25g] anchovies plus 1oz. [25g]
garlic, per person.

[note: real addicted people here require much more]


One ounce of garlic cloves is about 5 of them (I just weighed some).

Anchovies will come in a package that tells you the weight contained.
You can estimate from there.

Oil etc. - "at least" the same weight as anchovies or garlic,
i.e. 3oz.-4 oz. [100g] for king-size, and 1oz. [25g] for first
tentative; "not more than" twice that quantity (i.e. 6oz.-8oz.
[200g] or 2oz. [50g]), per person. Exact weight is a matter of
fine alchemy and individual taste (see preparation below).


For oil, figure roughly one ounce per ounce (although it's actually
slightly less). That is if you need 4 ounces by weight, 4 ounces by
volume is close enough. Butter is easier; the packages tell you the weights.

[note: if you want to use salted anchovies, you will need
somewhat more oil]

Vegetables - a lot, in the region of 1lb-2lb [500g-1kg] per
person. See below for details.


I'd say 1 1/2 pounds total weight per person assuming all adults. Kids
and older people will eat less. Football players, stonecutters and
loggers will eat more.

INITIAL PREPARATION

ANCHOVIES - the ones preserved in oil require really little
work: just open the can.

On the other hand, the salted ones require ACCURATE washing.
You need to totally eliminate any trace whatsoever of salt,
which will have soaked the anchovies. Wash, wash, wash, and
then wash a little more (and they will taste salted anyway).


Salted ones as mentioned here are the dry-salted anchovies. They're
available in the U.S., but oil-packed ones are much more common.

If the anchovies come with their bones, these of course
have to be accurately eliminated as well.

[note: the traditional recipe requires salted anchovies for
the simple reason that a couple of centuries ago there was
no way of preserving them, short of salt]


And because people like that salty note in food. My Sicilian
grandparents used dry-salted anchovies in their cooking with just a
quick rinse.

GARLIC - eliminate the external skin of each clove, then cut
the clove in two in the "long" sense. You will note the
presence of an internal "anima" ("soul") somewhat separated
from the pulp (and maybe green-coloured, if the garlic is
a bit too old). Eliminate it, since it has a bitter taste,
leaves a "bad mouth" for days thereafter, and is difficult
to digest.


A bit too fastidious, I'd say. For all the garlic I've eaten, I don't
recall ever having "a "bad mouth" for days thereafter." YMMV

Cut and/or crush the remaining part of the cloves in little
pieces, then put them into a dish/cup/bowl and cover them
with milk. The scope of this action is "smoothing" the taste
of the garlic. Leave in the milk bath for some time (the
more the better! At the very least, a couple of hours) then
throw away the liquid. Don't add this liquid in the cooking
bowl, since by now its taste will be sour.

[note: this milk is in addition to the quantity of milk/
/oil/butter/cream listed above]


My grandmother did this with raw milk from our cows, cream still in it.
She cooked the milk after straining the garlic out and reduced it to
about 1/4 of the original volume. It went into other dishes, most often
creamy sauces for pasta or over polenta piled with stewed chicken as a
flavoring ingredient.

She was a school teacher in Italy and he was a blacksmith before they
came to the U.S., both from frugal peasant stock. Waste nothing.

VEGETABLES - You don't exactly "eat" BC, you actually eat
the vegetables dipped into it. You can dip just anything,
we mainly use:

- red or yellow peppers, raw (or roasted over the fire,
according to taste), sliced.
- cauliflower, boiled, cut to pieces.
- potatoes, boiled, de-skinned and cut to pieces.
- cardoons (eliminate the hardest parts and put the softer
"heart" parts into a bowl, under water and a little lemon
juice).


Cardoons are related to artichokes but are rather rare in the U.S.

- topinanbur (I really don't know how this ones are called
in English. In the first picture listed below they are the
yellowish-brown funny things in the foreground, on the
centre-right).


Jerusalem artichokes.
For a similar, crunchy texture, try water chestnuts or slices of jicama.

- salad, lettuce, cabbage, radish, etc.


Steamed broccoli florets
Endive leaves

and any other dippable, comestible thing that strikes your
fancy, including of course bread (you will strongly need
bread in the last phase, when you will feel a strong urge
to clean your dish from any remaining atom of BC).

[note: a typical local hors d'oeuvre is sliced roasted
peppers with a little BC over them. And try it on chips!]


And in our house, the BC isn't just a dip. It's also spooned over other
foods. There's always a bowl of pasta (macaroni of some sort, cooked,
drained, buttered, hot to table), cold poached shrimp, breads (usually a
crusty one and another like a foccacia with olives baked into it or one
with salt, basil and rosemary), meatballs (veal with very little
seasoning); occasionally - hot baked clams or pieces of fish, grilled
slices of eggplant and zucchini, chunks of lobster tail and claw meat
(we got them ourselves at their summer place on the ocean back in the day).

COOKING

The scent of the cooking will inevitably permeate your
kitchen for some days thereafter. You will probably NOT
note it the morning after, but any guy who didn't have
previously tasted BC will!!! Maybe you want to do the
cooking outdoor, if you can (and maybe have the entire
meal outdoor, like a barbecue).


This is a bit strong a description. It's highly scented, but mine
doesn't seem to be quite this pungent.

BC should be cooked only in its typical pottery bowl
called "Diān" (prn. "Deeaan!"), with its characteristic
chocolate-brown exterior. I don't know if it can be found
in your country: it's a kind of little frying pan about
8in [20cm] diameter and 2in [5cm] high, in a single piece
with its pottery panhandle. Any sort of pottery bowl able
to stand the fire will do; as a last resort, try a metal
one, but I do nor guarantee the result (pottery has an
altogether different way of transmitting heat).


A good, heavy metal fondue pot or ceramic caquelin as for cheese fondue
will work.

Put "a little" oil/butter in the bowl and start the fire.
Keep the fire VERY low!! When the oil is warm and/or the
butter is liquid, add the anchovies and the pieces of garlic.


Heat really needs to be VERY low, as Davide says. Otherwise you scorch
the garlic and it becomes very bitter.

From this time, the cooking is a matter of EYE! You will
stir constantly, never stopping, with your WOODEN spoon,
breaking and amalgamating anchovies and garlic with the
frying oil/butter/milk/cream, poured in the bowl little
by little as required. You need to obtain a soft, dense,
smooth, HOMOGENEOUS cream: too little oil and it will burn
(same if fire is too hot), too much oil and the result will
be a "hot oil soup", with some islands of BC sadly floating
into a sea of fat - not a very pleasant sight. Add oil
any time the sauce seems to "dry", and stir for some time
before adding it again.

Remember, you need a dense sauce, not a liquid soup.


In recent years, I've taken to using a wand blender to break up the
pieces so the cooking goes more easily. I still cook it long enough, but
that constant stirring is minimized a bit. The finished dip is smoother
this way and, as far as I can see, doesn't damage or reduce the quality
or mouthfeel. It still tastes good and it feels good with the other
foods. And it will pull together a mixture with a small amount too much
oil and spare you the puddle problem.

[note: if something went wrong, and in the end there is
an obvious lake of oil inside your bowl, better eliminate
it with a spoon before serving in table]

At some time during the stirring (say, after 10-20 minutes
of cooking) you will note that the colour of the BC
(initially anchovy-brown) will more or less suddenly turn
to grey. This indicates that the cooking is done, and the
bowl can be served in table.

ON TABLE

BC has to be tasted hot or at least very warm, period.

It is served in ad-hoc pottery structures that contains
an upper floor for the sauce, and a lower floor for a
candle to keep it warm (see pictures). If you can't find
them, put at least a candle fire on the table under the
main bowl, and serve in each dish just a little hot BC
each time.


Any *adjustable* rechaud for fondue can work if you set it at its lowest
heat. You're not cooking at table, merely sustaining the heat already in
there. A candle as for a chocolate fondue is better. Stir it to prevent
even the slightest scorching.

The vegetables will be distributed in the middle of the
table, for everyone to choose what he likes and dip it
into his own dish. In case of DEEP friendship or REAL
love amongst guests, you can eliminate the intermediate
step and just dip things all together into the main bowl!!


This is how we do it in our family. No double-dipping. No fingers in the
BC.

For guests, we put out small dishes that look like Japanese soup bowls
and let guests spoon some of the BC into theirs. That bowl sits on
another, larger flat dish onto which people can put whatever they want
from the trays in the center of the table. For example, spoon some pasta
on the plate and drizzle a little BC over top. Parmesan or not as they
choose.

WINE

A strong Piedmontese dish, BC requires a strong
Piedmontese red wine. The choice is restricted to:

- Barbera
- Dolcetto
- Nebbiolo (or Nebiolo)

Barbera is usually the first choice, being the "normal",
"common" (and cheapest, and a bit "rude") wine here.
Dolcetto is somewhat more noble (and a bit more costly);
Nebbiolo is nobler and costlier still. Since the strong
garlic presence will by and large mask anything else, it
is useless to use a more precious wine than these three.

[note: the exceptionally good Barolo is actually made
with the very same Nebbiolo grapevine. However, it can
be called Barolo only if it grows in a very restricted
geographical zone. So, 99% of people will probably not
find much difference between a 100$ Barolo bottle and
a 10$ Nebbiolo bottle]


My grandfather (and his friends, all at least in their 60's by the time
I knew them, called themselves "gli ragazzi" - the boys) made all the
wines we drank. For this meal, it was almost always a slightly rough
one. The intensity of the flavors of the foods meant that subtle, fine
wines would be wasted, as Davide says.

PICTURES

I have found on the Web these pictures, to give some idea
of the final result:
http://www.regione.piemonte.it/agri/...frutta/bcauda/
http://www.piemonte-online.com/cucin...bagnacauda.htm
http://www.mangiarebene.com/accademi...gna_cauda.html
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ricett...ricetta_dove=3

I have also found another BC recipe in English:
www.italianmade.com/recipes/recipe75.cfm


Buon Appetito! (have a good meal!)


Wonderful post. A good glimpse into a different way of looking at food
than is usually the case in the U.S. (and most any other country I've
been to).

Mille grazie...

Pastorio
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-07-2005, 10:56 PM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bob (this one)" wrote:
Wonderful post. A good glimpse into a different way of looking at food
than is usually the case in the U.S. (and most any other country I've been
to

Mille grazie...


Thank You!

Pastorio


You know that my surname is Pastore and my name is Davide )))

Ciao Pastorio! also from Pandora.


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-07-2005, 11:03 PM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bob wrote:
Mille grazie...


Very good italian, dear Pastorio. Tomorrow I will post other photo of "Bagna
cauda" which we have eaten just three hours ago.
Ciao e Mille grazie anche a te!
Pandora


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Old 05-07-2005, 11:51 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pandora wrote:

"Bob wrote:

Mille grazie...


Very good italian, dear Pastorio. Tomorrow I will post other photo of "Bagna
cauda" which we have eaten just three hours ago.
Ciao e Mille grazie anche a te!
Pandora


Prego.

Parle Friulano ("Furlan" in nostra casa.). Impara in gli Stati Uniti LOL

Adesso mangiamo...?

Pastorio


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 08:40 AM
sf
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 18:51:15 -0400, Bob (this one) wrote:

Prego.


Prego, my foot... I'm hungry and I want to see the picture now!

LOL
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 09:01 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Here is some photos of Bagna Caoda we eat yesterday evening.
We have post the recipe some post ago...

http://tinypic.com/6rrrly.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rrrs1.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rrrxd.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rsc9x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rscg9.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rscj7.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rscvm.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rscy9.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6rsd52.jpg

Cheers Pandora e Pandoro (Davide, my boyfriend)


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 09:18 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bob (this one)"
Pandora wrote:
Very good italian, dear Pastorio. Tomorrow I will post other photo of
"Bagna cauda" which we have eaten just three hours ago.
Ciao e Mille grazie anche a te!
Pandora


Prego.

Parle Friulano ("Furlan" in nostra casa.). Impara in gli Stati Uniti
Adesso mangiamo...?

You should learn italian, not a dialect ))))
Ciao
Pandora


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Old 06-07-2005, 11:01 AM
sf
 
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Default

On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 08:01:44 GMT, Pandora wrote:

http://tinypic.com/6rrrs1.jpg



pandora... will you be my personal shopper? I LOVE that tablecloth.
If I send money, will you shop for me?

sf

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 11:25 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"sf" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 08:01:44 GMT, Pandora wrote:

http://tinypic.com/6rrrs1.jpg



pandora... will you be my personal shopper? I LOVE that tablecloth.
If I send money, will you shop for me?


I bought last year. But i don't Know if I will find again! If I will find I
will tell you.
You are always very kind ))))
So I must thinK to open an import- export factory )))
Cheers
Pandora




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 07:43 PM
sf
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 10:25:49 GMT, Pandora wrote:

So I must thinK to open an import- export factory )))



Not as far fetched as you may think... one of our former posters has
done just that. He's so busy now that I haven't seen a peep from him
in a couple of years.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-07-2005, 08:05 PM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"sf" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 10:25:49 GMT, Pandora wrote:

So I must thinK to open an import- export factory )))



Not as far fetched as you may think... one of our former posters has
done just that. He's so busy now that I haven't seen a peep from him
in a couple of years.


It means that he hates business (what a pity for him!) ))
Pandora


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-07-2005, 06:25 AM
serene
 
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Pandora wrote:

Here is some photos of Bagna Caoda we eat yesterday evening.
We have post the recipe some post ago...


Wow. Beautiful.

serene
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-07-2005, 06:56 AM
Pandora
 
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"serene" wrote:

Here is some photos of Bagna Caoda we eat yesterday evening.
We have post the recipe some post ago...


Wow. Beautiful.
serene


Thank you.
Pandora




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