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Old 05-07-2005, 04:43 AM
Me
 
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Default Iced tea

what's the difference between brewed & steeped?



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Old 05-07-2005, 04:52 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Mon 04 Jul 2005 08:43:59p, Me wrote in rec.food.cooking:

what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


I didn't know there was a difference unless, of course, you're using an "iced
tea machine", in which case I would think "brewed" we be appropriate.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 05-07-2005, 03:32 PM
limey
 
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"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


If you prepare tea correctly, brewed and steeped are the same.

Dora


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Old 05-07-2005, 05:29 PM
Dimitri
 
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"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


Brewed is made with hot water.
Steeped is generally made with cold water such as sun tea.

Fill a jug with cold water, add the tea in bags, cover and put out in the sun to
steep. Good stuff.

Dimitri


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Old 05-07-2005, 05:45 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 05 Jul 2005 09:29:59a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


Brewed is made with hot water.
Steeped is generally made with cold water such as sun tea.

Fill a jug with cold water, add the tea in bags, cover and put out in
the sun to steep. Good stuff.

Dimitri


Cookbooks often say to pour boiling water over the tea in a teapot and allow
to "steep".

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 05-07-2005, 06:13 PM
Ophelia
 
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"limey" wrote in message
...

"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


If you prepare tea correctly, brewed and steeped are the same.


In UK yes


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Old 05-07-2005, 06:34 PM
Dimitri
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Tue 05 Jul 2005 09:29:59a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


Brewed is made with hot water.
Steeped is generally made with cold water such as sun tea.

Fill a jug with cold water, add the tea in bags, cover and put out in
the sun to steep. Good stuff.

Dimitri


Cookbooks often say to pour boiling water over the tea in a teapot and allow
to "steep".

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*



2 out of 3 say nothing about heat:

Dimitri

4 entries found for steep.
To select an entry, click on it.
steep[1,adjective]steep[2,noun]steep[3,verb]steep[4,noun]

Main Entry: steep
Function: verb
Etymology: Middle English stepen; akin to Swedish stöpa to steep
transitive senses

1 : to soak in a liquid at a temperature under the boiling point (as for
softening, bleaching, or extracting an essence)

2 : to cover with or plunge into a liquid (as in bathing, rinsing, or soaking)

3 : to saturate with or subject thoroughly to (some strong or pervading
influence) practices steeped in tradition
intransitive senses : to undergo the process of soaking in a liquid

synonym see SOAK
- steep·er noun


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Old 05-07-2005, 06:58 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Tue 05 Jul 2005 10:34:17a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Tue 05 Jul 2005 09:29:59a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Me" wrote in message
...
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?

Brewed is made with hot water.
Steeped is generally made with cold water such as sun tea.

Fill a jug with cold water, add the tea in bags, cover and put out in
the sun to steep. Good stuff.

Dimitri


Cookbooks often say to pour boiling water over the tea in a teapot and
allow to "steep".

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*



2 out of 3 say nothing about heat:

Dimitri

4 entries found for steep.
To select an entry, click on it.
steep[1,adjective]steep[2,noun]steep[3,verb]steep[4,noun]

Main Entry: steep
Function: verb
Etymology: Middle English stepen; akin to Swedish stöpa to steep
transitive senses

1 : to soak in a liquid at a temperature under the boiling point (as for
softening, bleaching, or extracting an essence)

2 : to cover with or plunge into a liquid (as in bathing, rinsing, or
soaking)

3 : to saturate with or subject thoroughly to (some strong or pervading
influence) practices steeped in tradition
intransitive senses : to undergo the process of soaking in a liquid

synonym see SOAK
- steep·er noun


I wasn't referring to dictionary definitions, but to cookbooks.

For example, from Joy of Cooking, 1964 Edition:

"Place tea leaves in a preheated pot... Water should only just have arrived
at a brisk rolling boil... Pour over leaves, stir, and permit to steep not
less than 3 and not more thana 5 minutes."

There are many similar references in other cookbooks.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 05-07-2005, 07:19 PM
Dave Smith
 
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Me wrote:

what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


You brew something by steeping it.


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Old 06-07-2005, 12:59 AM
limey
 
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"Ophelia" wrote
"limey" wrote in message
"Me" wrote in message
what's the difference between brewed & steeped?


If you prepare tea correctly, brewed and steeped are the same.


Dora

In UK yes


Ophelia


:-)

Dora




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Old 06-07-2005, 03:30 PM
Dimitri
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Tue 05 Jul 2005 10:34:17a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


Snip every time I use boiling water to brew the tea for iced tea I notice a
small "film" on the surface of the tea when cooled. If I make a cold steeped
tea I do not have that "film" and the tea is less bitter.


Dimitri


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Old 06-07-2005, 03:56 PM
Peter Aitken
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Wed 06 Jul 2005 07:30:43a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Tue 05 Jul 2005 10:34:17a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


Snip every time I use boiling water to brew the tea for iced tea I
notice a small "film" on the surface of the tea when cooled. If I make
a cold steeped tea I do not have that "film" and the tea is less bitter.


Dimitri


I've seen that, too. I'm guessing that's the oil from the leaves,
although
I've also seen it on "sun tea".

If I steep tea in cold water, it never seems to have as robust a flavor.
Not sure I notice any bitterness either way.


Bitterness comes from steeping too long or low quality tea.



--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


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Old 06-07-2005, 03:58 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 06 Jul 2005 07:30:43a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Tue 05 Jul 2005 10:34:17a, Dimitri wrote in rec.food.cooking:


Snip every time I use boiling water to brew the tea for iced tea I
notice a small "film" on the surface of the tea when cooled. If I make
a cold steeped tea I do not have that "film" and the tea is less bitter.


Dimitri


I've seen that, too. I'm guessing that's the oil from the leaves, although
I've also seen it on "sun tea".

If I steep tea in cold water, it never seems to have as robust a flavor.
Not sure I notice any bitterness either way.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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