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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
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Default Challenging dinner guests

A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
(eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
not many. Everyone else is easy.

The menu will be:

Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
guests)
Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
them in.

I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.

Ginny
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Doug Kanter
 
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"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
...
>A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
> not many. Everyone else is easy.
>
> The menu will be:
>
> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
> guests)
> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
> them in.
>
> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
> I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
> it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
> you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.
>
> Ginny


Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
forms.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Fri 18 Mar 2005 06:57:33a, Ginny Sher wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
> not many. Everyone else is easy.
>
> The menu will be:
>
> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
> guests)
> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
> them in.
>
> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
> I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
> it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
> you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.
>
> Ginny
>


What about this black bean salad from Alton Brown, served on a bed of
greens?

2 cups dried black beans
1/2 celery stalk
1/2 carrot
A few sprigs fresh thyme
A few sprigs fresh parsley
1 bay leaf
1/2 onion
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/3 cup lime juice
1 red onion, minced
A handful fresh cilantro, chopped
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon chili powder
Kosher salt and pepper

Tie the celery, carrot, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle using
cotton butcher?s twine. Place the beans, bundle, and onion into a pot. Add
just enough water to barely cover the beans. Bring to a simmer, partially
cover, and cook for 1 to 2 hours until beans are barely tender.
After 30 minutes, add the salt to the beans. Occasionally check on the
beans and add water to cover the beans, if needed.

When beans are just barely tender, drain them and remove the carrot bundle.
Toss the beans while hot with the olive oil, lime juice, onion, cilantro,
cumin, and chili powder. Chill thoroughly and season with salt and pepper.

Note: I would also add some fresh sliced raw celery to the beans after
cooking.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
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Default

>
>
>What about this black bean salad from Alton Brown, served on a bed of
>greens?
>
>2 cups dried black beans
>1/2 celery stalk
>1/2 carrot
>A few sprigs fresh thyme
>A few sprigs fresh parsley
>1 bay leaf
>1/2 onion
>2 teaspoons kosher salt
>1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
>1/3 cup lime juice
>1 red onion, minced
>A handful fresh cilantro, chopped
>1 teaspoon ground cumin
>1 teaspoon chili powder
>Kosher salt and pepper
>
>Tie the celery, carrot, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle using
>cotton butcher?s twine. Place the beans, bundle, and onion into a pot. Add
>just enough water to barely cover the beans. Bring to a simmer, partially
>cover, and cook for 1 to 2 hours until beans are barely tender.
>After 30 minutes, add the salt to the beans. Occasionally check on the
>beans and add water to cover the beans, if needed.
>
>When beans are just barely tender, drain them and remove the carrot bundle.
>Toss the beans while hot with the olive oil, lime juice, onion, cilantro,
>cumin, and chili powder. Chill thoroughly and season with salt and pepper.
>
>Note: I would also add some fresh sliced raw celery to the beans after
>cooking.


That sounds good. I like that it has some chili flavoring because I'm
also using the chipotle sauce and it might go nicely together.

For clarity, would the beans be served in a pile on top of greens...
or tossed throughout?

Many thanks,
Ginny
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
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Default

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 14:08:25 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> wrote:

>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
.. .
>>A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
>> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
>> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
>> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
>> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
>> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
>> not many. Everyone else is easy.
>>
>> The menu will be:
>>
>> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
>> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
>> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
>> guests)
>> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
>> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
>> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
>> them in.
>>
>> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
>> I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
>> it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
>> you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.
>>
>> Ginny

>
>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>forms.
>

Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.

Ginny


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
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Default


>What about this black bean salad from Alton Brown, served on a bed of
>greens?
>
>2 cups dried black beans
>1/2 celery stalk
>1/2 carrot
>A few sprigs fresh thyme
>A few sprigs fresh parsley
>1 bay leaf
>1/2 onion
>2 teaspoons kosher salt
>1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
>1/3 cup lime juice
>1 red onion, minced
>A handful fresh cilantro, chopped
>1 teaspoon ground cumin
>1 teaspoon chili powder
>Kosher salt and pepper
>
>Tie the celery, carrot, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle using
>cotton butcher?s twine. Place the beans, bundle, and onion into a pot. Add
>just enough water to barely cover the beans. Bring to a simmer, partially
>cover, and cook for 1 to 2 hours until beans are barely tender.
>After 30 minutes, add the salt to the beans. Occasionally check on the
>beans and add water to cover the beans, if needed.
>
>When beans are just barely tender, drain them and remove the carrot bundle.
>Toss the beans while hot with the olive oil, lime juice, onion, cilantro,
>cumin, and chili powder. Chill thoroughly and season with salt and pepper.
>
>Note: I would also add some fresh sliced raw celery to the beans after
>cooking.



Wayne... do you think this would also need a salad dressing? (I just
happen to have several limes leftover from the pie.)

Ginny
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Doug Kanter
 
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"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
...

>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>>forms.
>>

> Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
> beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>
> Ginny


I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY
nasty reactions to black beans.

It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your conclusion
that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go ahead with your
plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see people avoiding the
black beans.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dimitri
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
...
>A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
> not many. Everyone else is easy.
>
> The menu will be:
>
> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
> guests)
> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
> them in.
>
> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
> I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
> it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
> you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.
>
> Ginny


Beans and rice are the perfect meat (protein) replacement. We have a
vegetarian in our family Cheese is also a good source of protein.

Dimitri


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:09:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> wrote:

>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
.. .
>
>>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>>>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>>>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>>>forms.
>>>

>> Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
>> beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>>
>> Ginny

>
>I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
>Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY
>nasty reactions to black beans.
>
>It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your conclusion
>that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go ahead with your
>plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see people avoiding the
>black beans.
>

Thanks, I'll check with my guests before I commit to a black bean
dish.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Ginny Sher wrote:
> The menu will be:
>
> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
> guests)
> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
> them in.
>
> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
> [snip]


Couscous. Very fast and easy, very flexible. Goes better with salmon
than beans, imho. -aem



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:09:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> wrote:

>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
.. .
>
>>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>>>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>>>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>>>forms.
>>>

>> Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
>> beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>>
>> Ginny

>
>I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
>Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY
>nasty reactions to black beans.
>
>It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your conclusion
>that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go ahead with your
>plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see people avoiding the
>black beans.
>


This is news to me. I love black beans, and have never seen anyone
avoid them.

Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


Let us restore integrity and honor to the White House
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve the Sauropodman
 
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Or orzo pasta, with roasted red peppers, onions and wilted spinach,
simply dressed in good olive oil, salt, pepper and fresh parsley.

Steve

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Priscilla H. Ballou
 
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Ginny Sher wrote:
>
> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
> not many. Everyone else is easy.
>
> The menu will be:
>
> Artichokes (gotta have 'em while they're in season)
> Grilled salmon basted with Roasted Chipotle Raspberry Sauce
> Cornbread (leftover and frozen from last weeks dinner with other
> guests)
> Key Lime Cheesecake ( I made this last night and licked the bowl
> clean. Simple and delicious. I'll post recipe later)
> Fresh strawberries with a bowl of sour cream and brown sugar to dip
> them in.
>
> I need something to be included on the dinner plate with the salmon.
> I was thinking of some black bean dish but I've drawn a blank. Maybe
> it should be a green salad... possibly with beans in it?? If any of
> you have suggestions, ya know... I am always grateful.


Definitely a green salad. Crunchy with some of the green good 'n' dark.

Priscilla
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Doug Kanter
 
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"Rodney Myrvaagnes" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:09:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> > wrote:
>
>>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
. ..
>>
>>>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>>>>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>>>>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>>>>forms.
>>>>
>>> Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
>>> beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>>>
>>> Ginny

>>
>>I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
>>Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get
>>VERY
>>nasty reactions to black beans.
>>
>>It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your conclusion
>>that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go ahead with your
>>plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see people avoiding
>>the
>>black beans.
>>

>
> This is news to me. I love black beans, and have never seen anyone
> avoid them.


Hey....I love mayonnaise, but I see lots of people avoid it.


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
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Default



Ginny Sher wrote:

> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
> not many. Everyone else is easy.


Sorry, but I make it a rule not to invite people with vegetarian diets for
dinner. I prefer to wait 6 months for them to get back into meat, Find
some other occasion to invite them for, but leave the enjoyment of good
food to people who don't choose to refrain from the basics of our human
diet.




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Fri 18 Mar 2005 07:45:34a, Ginny Sher wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>>
>>
>>What about this black bean salad from Alton Brown, served on a bed of
>>greens?
>>
>>2 cups dried black beans
>>1/2 celery stalk
>>1/2 carrot
>>A few sprigs fresh thyme
>>A few sprigs fresh parsley
>>1 bay leaf
>>1/2 onion
>>2 teaspoons kosher salt
>>1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
>>1/3 cup lime juice
>>1 red onion, minced
>>A handful fresh cilantro, chopped
>>1 teaspoon ground cumin
>>1 teaspoon chili powder
>>Kosher salt and pepper
>>
>>Tie the celery, carrot, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle using
>>cotton butcher?s twine. Place the beans, bundle, and onion into a pot.
>>Add just enough water to barely cover the beans. Bring to a simmer,
>>partially cover, and cook for 1 to 2 hours until beans are barely
>>tender. After 30 minutes, add the salt to the beans. Occasionally check
>>on the beans and add water to cover the beans, if needed.
>>
>>When beans are just barely tender, drain them and remove the carrot
>>bundle. Toss the beans while hot with the olive oil, lime juice, onion,
>>cilantro, cumin, and chili powder. Chill thoroughly and season with salt
>>and pepper.
>>
>>Note: I would also add some fresh sliced raw celery to the beans after
>>cooking.

>
> That sounds good. I like that it has some chili flavoring because I'm
> also using the chipotle sauce and it might go nicely together.
>
> For clarity, would the beans be served in a pile on top of greens...
> or tossed throughout?
>
> Many thanks,
> Ginny
>


I would serve it on top of the greens.


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Fri 18 Mar 2005 07:53:18a, Ginny Sher wrote in rec.food.cooking:

>
>>What about this black bean salad from Alton Brown, served on a bed of
>>greens?
>>
>>2 cups dried black beans
>>1/2 celery stalk
>>1/2 carrot
>>A few sprigs fresh thyme
>>A few sprigs fresh parsley
>>1 bay leaf
>>1/2 onion
>>2 teaspoons kosher salt
>>1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
>>1/3 cup lime juice
>>1 red onion, minced
>>A handful fresh cilantro, chopped
>>1 teaspoon ground cumin
>>1 teaspoon chili powder
>>Kosher salt and pepper
>>
>>Tie the celery, carrot, thyme, parsley, and bay leaf into a bundle using
>>cotton butcher?s twine. Place the beans, bundle, and onion into a pot.
>>Add just enough water to barely cover the beans. Bring to a simmer,
>>partially cover, and cook for 1 to 2 hours until beans are barely
>>tender. After 30 minutes, add the salt to the beans. Occasionally check
>>on the beans and add water to cover the beans, if needed.
>>
>>When beans are just barely tender, drain them and remove the carrot
>>bundle. Toss the beans while hot with the olive oil, lime juice, onion,
>>cilantro, cumin, and chili powder. Chill thoroughly and season with salt
>>and pepper.
>>
>>Note: I would also add some fresh sliced raw celery to the beans after
>>cooking.

>
>
> Wayne... do you think this would also need a salad dressing? (I just
> happen to have several limes leftover from the pie.)
>
> Ginny
>


It certainly couldn't hurt to have a nice lime vinaigrette, perhaps an
extension of the mix the beans are tossed with, and perhaps in a small
pitcher or bowl on the table.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter Aitken
 
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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Ginny Sher wrote:
>
>> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
>> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
>> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
>> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
>> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
>> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
>> not many. Everyone else is easy.

>
> Sorry, but I make it a rule not to invite people with vegetarian diets for
> dinner. I prefer to wait 6 months for them to get back into meat, Find
> some other occasion to invite them for, but leave the enjoyment of good
> food to people who don't choose to refrain from the basics of our human
> diet.
>
>


Anyone who eats fish is not a vegetarian. Case closed. Unless a higher power
has elevated fish to vegetable status while I was not looking.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 17:17:50 -0500, Dave Smith
> wrote:

>
>
>Ginny Sher wrote:
>
>> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
>> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
>> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
>> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
>> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
>> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
>> not many. Everyone else is easy.

>
>Sorry, but I make it a rule not to invite people with vegetarian diets for
>dinner. I prefer to wait 6 months for them to get back into meat, Find
>some other occasion to invite them for, but leave the enjoyment of good
>food to people who don't choose to refrain from the basics of our human
>diet.
>


6 months or 6 years.... it won't make a difference. My girlfriend has
followed Pritkin lifestyle for probably 20 years. Her husband has
also been a vegetarian for at least 10 years. Until recently, he ate
everything else yummy like cheese, desserts, etc. but the doctor put
him on a restricted diet.

Ginny

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ginny Sher
 
Posts: n/a
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. They'll be here in about 4
hours... I better hurry up and decide what to serve.

Ginny


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
aem
 
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Ginny Sher wrote:
> [snip] Her husband has
> also been a vegetarian for at least 10 years. Until recently, he ate
> everything else yummy like cheese, desserts, etc. but the doctor put
> him on a restricted diet.
>

He was a vegetarian for >10 years, and now the doctor has restricted
his diet even further? Maybe his diet needs to be expanded, instead.
-aem

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
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Ginny Sher wrote:

>
> 6 months or 6 years.... it won't make a difference. My girlfriend has
> followed Pritkin lifestyle for probably 20 years. Her husband has
> also been a vegetarian for at least 10 years. Until recently, he ate
> everything else yummy like cheese, desserts, etc. but the doctor put
> him on a restricted diet.


Of all the vegetarians I have none, very few of them have stuck it out more
than a few years. I have to admit that some of them seem to benefit from it. A
few of the female vegetarians I know have wonderful complexions. Others have
just looked sickly.

I posted previously about being expected to cater to a vegan niece at our house
a few years ago. The next time I saw her was at a buffet brunch where she
gorged on bacon, ham, chicken, roast beef.

I am sorry, but I am not a vegetarian. I cook lots of vegetables, but not
"vegetarian dishes". I just prefer to stick to what I know and what I would
like to learn, not what to do to indulge people who adopt diets that are devoid
of what I consider to be the feature dish of a meal, the cooked flesh, and in
some cases the uncooked flesh.




  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
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Dan Abel wrote:

> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in posting
> that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or so and then
> give it up. I read something written by a doctor who said that he did not
> have any special advice for vegans who weren't getting enough vitamin B12,
> because the body has a three year supply, and most people don't stay vegan
> that long.


You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not interested in
indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet that is different from
mine. My system does not agree with cabbage and tomatoes. If I knew someone who
had to have cabbage rolls for dinner I would not invite them either. I don't
care care if people are vegetarians. Hell, it helps keep the price of meat down.
They can boycott meat until the cows come home. I'm just not interested in
catering to their diet. If they want to come to a dinner party and bring their
own food that would be great. If they want to come to a dinner party and eat just
vegetables that is fine, but I will be damned if I will cook a vegetarian meal
for them. The closest I come to a vegetarian meal is macaroni and cheese or three
cheese penne, and when I do that I have to listen to a carnivore wife complain.



> My son tried a vegetarian diet for about a year and then gave it up. On
> the other hand, my daughter went vegetarian at 13 and not only stuck it
> out for 6 years, but has now gone vegan (she gave up eggs and dairy).


I am sure that you can appreciate that she is more the exception than the rule.
Care to make a bet that she will stick to it forever?


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Ginny Sher wrote:
>
> Thanks everyone for the suggestions. They'll be here in about 4
> hours... I better hurry up and decide what to serve.
>
> Ginny


Skip the beans; the meal has more than enough protein. A green salad is
plenty to go with the salmon.


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
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Dave Smith wrote:
> Dan Abel wrote:
>
>> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in
>> posting
>> that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or so and
>> then
>> give it up. I read something written by a doctor who said that he
>> did not have any special advice for vegans who weren't getting
>> enough vitamin B12, because the body has a three year supply, and
>> most people don't stay vegan that long.

>
> You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not
> interested in indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet
> that is different from mine. My system does not agree with cabbage
> and tomatoes. If I knew someone who had to have cabbage rolls for
> dinner I would not invite them either. I don't care care if people
> are vegetarians. Hell, it helps keep the price of meat down. They can
> boycott meat until the cows come home. I'm just not interested in
> catering to their diet. If they want to come to a dinner party and
> bring their own food that would be great. If they want to come to a
> dinner party and eat just vegetables that is fine, but I will be
> damned if I will cook a vegetarian meal for them. The closest I come
> to a vegetarian meal is macaroni and cheese or three cheese penne,
> and when I do that I have to listen to a carnivore wife complain.
>
>
>
>> My son tried a vegetarian diet for about a year and then gave it up.
>> On
>> the other hand, my daughter went vegetarian at 13 and not only stuck
>> it
>> out for 6 years, but has now gone vegan (she gave up eggs and dairy).

>
> I am sure that you can appreciate that she is more the exception than
> the rule. Care to make a bet that she will stick to it forever?


Well let's see... my friend Sujata is a vegetarian and has been for 30
years; she was raised that way. Her husband, on the other hand and her
young daughter, eat meat. So she prepares meals acceptable for both. She's
not adverse to preparing meals with meat in them, she just won't eat them.
She does eggs/dairy, grains, veggies; no chicken or fish. I wouldn't say
she's going to fall off this "diet" any time soon.

Having said that, I agree with not going too far out to cater to a guests
particular diet, be it a fad or not. If you invite people over and they
know you are carnivores, they have the right to say "no thanks". Still, I'd
make an effort to have *something* if they said they would like to attend,
even if it's just grilled or steamed mixed vegetables or couscous or
something. Maybe they just like the company of the friend doing the
inviting.

Jill


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Dan Abel wrote:
>
>> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in posting
>> that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or so and then
>> give it up. I read something written by a doctor who said that he did
>> not
>> have any special advice for vegans who weren't getting enough vitamin
>> B12,
>> because the body has a three year supply, and most people don't stay
>> vegan
>> that long.

>
> You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not interested
> in
> indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet that is different
> from
> mine. My system does not agree with cabbage and tomatoes. If I knew
> someone who
> had to have cabbage rolls for dinner I would not invite them either. I
> don't
> care care if people are vegetarians. Hell, it helps keep the price of meat
> down.
> They can boycott meat until the cows come home. I'm just not interested in
> catering to their diet. If they want to come to a dinner party and bring
> their
> own food that would be great. If they want to come to a dinner party and
> eat just
> vegetables that is fine, but I will be damned if I will cook a vegetarian
> meal
> for them. The closest I come to a vegetarian meal is macaroni and cheese
> or three
> cheese penne, and when I do that I have to listen to a carnivore wife
> complain.


I got yer back, Dave. If I invite guests over for dinner, I plan the meal.
The guests can eat what they want. Pick and choose. However, I'll go you
one better. My carnivore wife complains if I make chicken instead of beef!

Thankfully, I don't have any vegetarian/vegan (didn't know there was a
difference) friends. Our friends all agree with Ron White's statement of "I
didn't climb to the top of the f*cking food chain to eat carrots!"

Bret



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  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri 18 Mar 2005 06:37:47p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Dave Smith wrote:
>> Dan Abel wrote:
>>
>>> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in
>>> posting that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or
>>> so and then give it up. I read something written by a doctor who
>>> said that he did not have any special advice for vegans who weren't
>>> getting enough vitamin B12, because the body has a three year supply,
>>> and most people don't stay vegan that long.

>>
>> You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not
>> interested in indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet
>> that is different from mine. My system does not agree with cabbage
>> and tomatoes. If I knew someone who had to have cabbage rolls for
>> dinner I would not invite them either. I don't care care if people
>> are vegetarians. Hell, it helps keep the price of meat down. They can
>> boycott meat until the cows come home. I'm just not interested in
>> catering to their diet. If they want to come to a dinner party and
>> bring their own food that would be great. If they want to come to a
>> dinner party and eat just vegetables that is fine, but I will be
>> damned if I will cook a vegetarian meal for them. The closest I come
>> to a vegetarian meal is macaroni and cheese or three cheese penne, and
>> when I do that I have to listen to a carnivore wife complain.
>>
>>
>>
>>> My son tried a vegetarian diet for about a year and then gave it up.
>>> On
>>> the other hand, my daughter went vegetarian at 13 and not only stuck
>>> it out for 6 years, but has now gone vegan (she gave up eggs and
>>> dairy).

>>
>> I am sure that you can appreciate that she is more the exception than
>> the rule. Care to make a bet that she will stick to it forever?

>
> Well let's see... my friend Sujata is a vegetarian and has been for 30
> years; she was raised that way. Her husband, on the other hand and her
> young daughter, eat meat. So she prepares meals acceptable for both.
> She's not adverse to preparing meals with meat in them, she just won't
> eat them. She does eggs/dairy, grains, veggies; no chicken or fish. I
> wouldn't say she's going to fall off this "diet" any time soon.


I would hazard a guess that most "lifetime" vegetarians were raised that
way, either in a vegetarian culture or a home environment that was
vegetarian.

I've never personally met anyone who "decided" to become vegetarian and
lived the rest of their lives as one.

> Having said that, I agree with not going too far out to cater to a
> guests particular diet, be it a fad or not. If you invite people over
> and they know you are carnivores, they have the right to say "no
> thanks". Still, I'd make an effort to have *something* if they said
> they would like to attend, even if it's just grilled or steamed mixed
> vegetables or couscous or something. Maybe they just like the company
> of the friend doing the inviting.
>
> Jill


--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Maverick wrote:
> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Dan Abel wrote:
>>
>>> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in
>>> posting
>>> that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or so and
>>> then
>>> give it up.

>> You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not
>> interested
>> in
>> indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet that is
>> different
>> from
>> mine.

>
> Thankfully, I don't have any vegetarian/vegan (didn't know there was a
> difference) friends. Our friends all agree with Ron White's
> statement of "I didn't climb to the top of the f*cking food chain to
> eat carrots!"
>
> Bret
>

To my understanding, Vegans don't eat any animal products at all. Strictly
vegetables and grains. No butter, no nothing that has anything to do with
animals including butter or milk from cows or goats. Strict Vegans also
won't eat honey although I have no idea what this has to do with "animal"
products since bees aren't animals. Vegetarians are more moderate, using
dairy products including cheese, butter but won't eat meat, fish or poultry.

Jill


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


jmcquown wrote:
>
> To my understanding, Vegans don't eat any animal products at all.

Strictly
> vegetables and grains. No butter, no nothing that has anything to do

with
> animals including butter or milk from cows or goats. Strict Vegans

also
> won't eat honey although I have no idea what this has to do with

"animal"
> products since bees aren't animals.
> Jill


Believe it or not, Jill, insects are indeed animals... they're as much
animals as lobsters, crabs, shrimp, etc.

Sheldon



  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Doug Kanter wrote:


> I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a

week.
> Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They

get VERY
> nasty reactions to black beans.


Something beyond what a tablet of Beano couldn't cure?

-j.

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maverick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Sheldon" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> To my understanding, Vegans don't eat any animal products at all.

> Strictly
>> vegetables and grains. No butter, no nothing that has anything to do

> with
>> animals including butter or milk from cows or goats. Strict Vegans

> also
>> won't eat honey although I have no idea what this has to do with

> "animal"
>> products since bees aren't animals.
>> Jill

>
> Believe it or not, Jill, insects are indeed animals... they're as much
> animals as lobsters, crabs, shrimp, etc.
>
> Sheldon


While that may be true in the broadest sense, we don't eat anything that
comes out of the bees. AFAIK, honey comes from the pollen collected by the
bees and stored around their legs. Am I wrong?

Bret



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  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
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jmcquown wrote:

>
> To my understanding, Vegans don't eat any animal products at all. Strictly
> vegetables and grains. No butter, no nothing that has anything to do with
> animals including butter or milk from cows or goats. Strict Vegans also
> won't eat honey although I have no idea what this has to do with "animal"
> products since bees aren't animals. Vegetarians are more moderate, using
> dairy products including cheese, butter but won't eat meat, fish or poultry.


From what I can gather, veganism is a way of living that excludes all forms of
exploitation of animals.

BTW.... Bees are animals. Their view is that bees are enslaved and exploited in
order to produce honey. In reality, and that may be a difficult concept for
vegans to wrap their heads around, only one bee in a hive is enslaved. That is
the queen. The rest of the bees are free to come and go as they please. If
something happens to the queen the whole hive will get up and move.

It is fascinating that something like honey can not be vegan because it involves
the exploitation of an animal that has a natural tendency to live wherever there
is a queen and spends its entire live flying back and forth to gather pollen
without any training at all. Yet Vegans generally espouse the virtues of organic
farming. That means that they use shit for fertilizer. Most of that shit comes
from cows and other animals on farms that are raising them for meat, or milk.

I wonder how they would ever have survived in the 19th century, before the days
of mechanized tractors. Farmers generally used horses or oxen to work their
fields. They used them to pull plows, the haul wagons, to operate various types
of farm equipment. The entire agricultural system replied almost entirely on the
exploitation of animals.

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Maverick wrote:

>
>
> While that may be true in the broadest sense, we don't eat anything that
> comes out of the bees. AFAIK, honey comes from the pollen collected by the
> bees and stored around their legs. Am I wrong?


It does come out of bees. The gathering bees buzz around collecting nectar from
flowers. They have two stomachs, one which they use for eating and digestion, and one
that is their little honey bag. After they get their second stomach full of nectar they
return to the hive where the nectar is sucked out of their stomachs by the worker bees.
The workers then chew it for about a half hour while their little bee enzymes work
their magic on the nectar, breaking down the complex sugars into simpler, more
digestible sugars which are resistant to bacteria. Then they deposit it around the hive
and fan it to dry it to a thicker consistency.

So not only has your honey actually been in a bee, it has been in at least two bees.

This is probably the sort of thing that you didn't really want to know about what the
heck honey really is and how it is made.



  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri 18 Mar 2005 09:07:38p, Dave Smith wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> From what I can gather, veganism is a way of living that excludes all
> forms of exploitation of animals.
>


These must be the same people that wear plastic shoes.

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Rodney Myrvaagnes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 22:52:01 GMT, "Peter Aitken"
> wrote:

>"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>>
>>
>> Ginny Sher wrote:
>>
>>> A few friends are coming over for dinner for game night. There will
>>> be 6 of us including my best friend and her husband. He is vegetarian
>>> (eats seafood & dairy) but recently has had an angioplasty, so he is
>>> being more careful about diet. I understand he gave us cheese but not
>>> much else. His wife and my dearest friend is also vegetarian; she
>>> eats the Pritikin diet... She makes some very small compromises, but
>>> not many. Everyone else is easy.

>>
>> Sorry, but I make it a rule not to invite people with vegetarian diets for
>> dinner. I prefer to wait 6 months for them to get back into meat, Find
>> some other occasion to invite them for, but leave the enjoyment of good
>> food to people who don't choose to refrain from the basics of our human
>> diet.
>>
>>

>
>Anyone who eats fish is not a vegetarian. Case closed. Unless a higher power
>has elevated fish to vegetable status while I was not looking.



I wouldn't argue about such words. But, if you are allowed both fish
and dairy, that is a pretty wide-open field of endeavor.

Among pasta sauces: pesto genovese, tomato/basil, putanesca, slivers
of salmon tossed with the noodles, garlic and oil, wild mushrooms and
garlic just for starters. Somebody already mentioned sauted spinach.
Lots of greens would take to the same procedure, such as rape,
escarole, dandelion, arugula, collards, chard.

If you have no wild mushrooms use creminis and saute them for 30 - 40
minutes. They will develop quite a lot of flavor. And you could cheat
by using a little dried porcini.

Steamed mussels.

Risotto made with fish stock and shrimp.

If I were a fish/vegetarian I am sure the list could go on and on. All
the above are quick enough to cook at home on a weeknight, with the
possible exception of the long-cooked cremini.

Anything you can put on pasta you can also put on spaghetti squash.


Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a


Let us restore integrity and honor to the White House
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
spamtrap
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
> On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:09:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
> > wrote:
>
>
>>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
. ..
>>
>>
>>>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than other
>>>>kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I were you,
>>>>unless you know these people already like black beans in their various
>>>>forms.
>>>>
>>>
>>>Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
>>>beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>>>
>>>Ginny

>>
>>I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
>>Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY
>>nasty reactions to black beans.
>>
>>It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your conclusion
>>that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go ahead with your
>>plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see people avoiding the
>>black beans.
>>

>
>
> This is news to me. I love black beans, and have never seen anyone
> avoid them.
>
>


I have to wonder if this is some type of twisted racial slur. A bean is
pretty much a bean. Why would he state "I wasn't clear about this. I
know people who eat beans 10 times a week. Kidney beans, pinto beans,
fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY nasty reactions to
black beans." if not for a some ethnocentric reason? It's not like black
beans are poisonous or anything.







  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri 18 Mar 2005 10:29:56p, spamtrap wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
>> On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 15:09:51 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"Ginny Sher" > wrote in message
...
>>>
>>>
>>>>>Black beans give some people MUCH worse digestive discomfort than
>>>>>other kinds of beans. Pain, in other words. I'd avoid that idea if I
>>>>>were you, unless you know these people already like black beans in
>>>>>their various forms.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Thanks for the heads-up. I'm pretty sure these people eat a lot of
>>>>beans regularly so I don't think there would be any problem.
>>>>
>>>>Ginny
>>>
>>>I wasn't clear about this. I know people who eat beans 10 times a week.
>>>Kidney beans, pinto beans, fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get
>>>VERY nasty reactions to black beans.
>>>
>>>It does NOT matter how often your guests eat other beans. Your
>>>conclusion that "there wouldn't be any problem" is based on air. Go
>>>ahead with your plans, but have another side dish ready in case you see
>>>people avoiding the black beans.
>>>

>>
>>
>> This is news to me. I love black beans, and have never seen anyone
>> avoid them.
>>
>>

>
> I have to wonder if this is some type of twisted racial slur. A bean is
> pretty much a bean. Why would he state "I wasn't clear about this. I
> know people who eat beans 10 times a week. Kidney beans, pinto beans,
> fava beans, navy beans, all kinds. They get VERY nasty reactions to
> black beans." if not for a some ethnocentric reason? It's not like black
> beans are poisonous or anything.


Have you nothing else to think about or dream up?

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ophelia
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jmcquown" > wrote in message
. ..
> Maverick wrote:
>> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Dan Abel wrote:
>>>
>>>> I don't agree with Dave's attitude on this, but he is correct in
>>>> posting
>>>> that many people give a vegetarian diet a try for a year or so and
>>>> then
>>>> give it up.
>>> You don't agree with my attitude? My attitude is that I am not
>>> interested
>>> in
>>> indulging people who are temporarily adopting a diet that is
>>> different
>>> from
>>> mine.

>>
>> Thankfully, I don't have any vegetarian/vegan (didn't know there was a
>> difference) friends. Our friends all agree with Ron White's
>> statement of "I didn't climb to the top of the f*cking food chain to
>> eat carrots!"
>>
>> Bret
>>

> To my understanding, Vegans don't eat any animal products at all.
> Strictly
> vegetables and grains. No butter, no nothing that has anything to do with
> animals including butter or milk from cows or goats. Strict Vegans also
> won't eat honey although I have no idea what this has to do with "animal"
> products since bees aren't animals. Vegetarians are more moderate, using
> dairy products including cheese, butter but won't eat meat, fish or
> poultry.


A vegetarian friend of mine says he will eat nothing with a face

O


  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ophelia wrote:

> A vegetarian friend of mine says he will eat nothing with a face


....so eggs, jellyfish, clams, oysters, and scallops would be okay? (I'm not
sure it's accurate to say that skate has a face, either.)

Or was he just being glib?

Bob


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