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Old 05-01-2005, 07:13 PM
mary
 
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Default Mussels Liquid

My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic matter
has been killed.

Thanks

Tom




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Old 05-01-2005, 08:06 PM
Dimitri
 
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"mary" wrote in message
...
My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid
for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic matter
has been killed.

Thanks

Tom





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Old 05-01-2005, 08:15 PM
Dimitri
 
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"mary" wrote in message
...
My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid
for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic matter
has been killed.

Thanks

Tom


Very acceptable - the liquid is called Liquor. Just strain it.

See below.

Dimitri

Moules Bordelaise
6 dozen mussels, medium to large
3.5oz fresh white breadcrumbs, not too fine
4 tbsp. Butter, clarified (melted and strained to remove the whey)
4 tbsp parsley, finely chopped
4 large cloves of garlic, finely chopped
The mussels can be cooked in advance if necessary. Over a high heat, take a
wide heavy pan with a tight fitting lid and put in a close single layer of
mussels. Put on the lid, set on the heat and leave for 30 seconds. Check to
see if the mussels are open, remove any that are, replace the lid and leave
for another 10 seconds. (The point is to give the mussels the minimum
cooking time possible)
When all the mussels are opened, remove and cook the next and subsequent
batches. As each batch is cooked, pour off and strain the liquor the mussels
have released. This can be frozen and used as part of a delicious fish soup
on another occasion.
Discard all the mussel shells and keep the mussels in a covered dish. Just
before serving, fry the breadcrumbs to a light golden brown colour in the
clarified butter. Mix the parsley and garlic, and add to the crumbs. Give
them a few seconds more for the garlic to soften slightly but do not
overcook, or the parsley will lose its fresh green colour and the crumbs
will turn soggy.
Heat the mussels through gently in another pan with a little butter, scoop
them into the pan of crumbs, being careful to leave the liquor behind, and
mix everything briefly together. Divide between four, warmed, bowls and
serve with French bread and a dry white wine.


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Old 05-01-2005, 11:09 PM
Chef R. W. Miller
 
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Default

French Mussel Soup

3 cups mussel liquid
4 Tablespoons butter
4 Tablespoons flour
2 cups milk
1 cup cream
1 Tablespoon brandy
salt to taste
pinch cayenne
pinch nutmeg

Heat butter in a large saucepan, add flour and stir 2 - 3 minutes
without browning. Remove from heat and slowly add 1 cup milk and
stir until smooth. Add the remaining milk and mussel liquid, return
to heat and bring to boil stirring all the time. Add remaining
ingredients and heat but do not boil.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------

Creamy Mussel Soup
With Saffron And White Wine

Ingredients

1 cup dry white wine
2 tablespoons butter
1 large leek (white and tender green), well rinsed and minced
1 medium celery rib, minced
2-1/2 cups Quick Fish Stock or clam or mussel juice
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 bay leaf
12 black peppercoms
12 parsley stems
1 teaspoon saffron threads
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Preparation

Strain mussle cooking liquid through a fine sieve into a large bowl.

In a soup pot, melt butter over medium heat. Add leek and celery and cook,
stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add mussle or fish
stock, thyme, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley, saffron, and reserved mussel
liquid. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove
and discard bay leaf.

In a food processor or blender, puree soup in batches until smooth and
return to soup pot. Bring to a boil. In a small bowl, blend cornstarch with
cream and stir into soup. Add salt and pepper and simmer, stirring
constantly, until slightly thickened, 2 to 3 minutes.

Strain soup through a sieve into a large saucepan and simmer over medium
heat until heated through, 3 to 5 minutes. Divide soup among 6 soup plates
and garnish each serving with a mussel on the half-shell.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------

Enjoy
Chef R. W. Miller
"mary" wrote in message
...
My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid

for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic matter
has been killed.

Thanks

Tom





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Old 05-01-2005, 11:32 PM
cjra
 
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Default

As I always use the liquid from the steaming as part of the dish (with
wine, butter, garlic, shallots, bay leaf), I'd guess so. It's nearly
the best part.



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Old 06-01-2005, 02:30 PM
Michael L Kankiewicz
 
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On Wed, 5 Jan 2005, mary wrote:

My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic matter
has been killed.


Definitely. Just be sure the shells are scrubbed clean before steaming.

MK

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Old 06-01-2005, 04:35 PM
Peter Horsman
 
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Default

The Mussels should still be live when you buy them so if your concerned soak
them in clean salted water and change the water a few times. I think they
will naturally clean themselves.. This is more of a question than a
statement..

Peter
In England


"Michael L Kankiewicz" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 5 Jan 2005, mary wrote:

My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid

for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic

matter
has been killed.


Definitely. Just be sure the shells are scrubbed clean before steaming.

MK



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Old 06-01-2005, 04:35 PM
Peter Horsman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Mussels should still be live when you buy them so if your concerned soak
them in clean salted water and change the water a few times. I think they
will naturally clean themselves.. This is more of a question than a
statement..

Peter
In England


"Michael L Kankiewicz" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 5 Jan 2005, mary wrote:

My local store has mussels on sale. I usually steam them. I assume the
mussels are raised on a mussel farm. Would it be safe to use the liquid

for
soup? The liquid has been boiled so I would think that any organic

matter
has been killed.


Definitely. Just be sure the shells are scrubbed clean before steaming.

MK



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Old 07-01-2005, 05:36 PM
Michael L Kankiewicz
 
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Default

On Thu, 6 Jan 2005, Peter Horsman wrote:

The Mussels should still be live when you buy them so if your concerned soak
them in clean salted water and change the water a few times. I think they
will naturally clean themselves.. This is more of a question than a
statement..


I was referring to the outside of the shells.

MK

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Old 07-01-2005, 05:36 PM
Michael L Kankiewicz
 
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Default

On Thu, 6 Jan 2005, Peter Horsman wrote:

The Mussels should still be live when you buy them so if your concerned soak
them in clean salted water and change the water a few times. I think they
will naturally clean themselves.. This is more of a question than a
statement..


I was referring to the outside of the shells.

MK



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