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[email protected] 22-11-2017 01:04 AM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
I'm thinking Italian or just plain pork. But I'm wondering how long it takes to boil them. I don't want to make them with the beans. I don't care about browning them either. How they look added to the bean mix doesn't mean much. I am thinking about making the beans by alone, then adding the boiled sausage afterwards along with some onion and bell pepper and garlic and parsley and cut up roma tomatoes, etc., sauteed in olive oil. It sounds like a stupid question and maybe it is, but I think boiling the sausage might reduce some of the fat, but not all the flavor. Again, I don't care about browning the sausage for this recipe, just how long to boil or simmer. I have no thermometer and have no intention of buying one. Thanks.

TJ

[email protected][_2_] 22-11-2017 01:11 AM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 7:04:04 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I'm thinking Italian or just plain pork. But I'm wondering how long it takes to boil them. I don't want to make them with the beans. I don't care about browning them either. How they look added to the bean mix doesn't mean much. I am thinking about making the beans by alone, then adding the boiled sausage afterwards along with some onion and bell pepper and garlic and parsley and cut up roma tomatoes, etc., sauteed in olive oil. It sounds like a stupid question and maybe it is, but I think boiling the sausage might reduce some of the fat, but not all the flavor. Again, I don't care about browning the sausage for this recipe, just how long to boil or simmer. I have no thermometer and have no intention of buying one. Thanks.

TJ


If they're Italian sausages I always poke holes in the casings to let
a lot of the fat drain out. What kind are you cooking?


[email protected] 22-11-2017 10:54 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 8:11:42 PM UTC-5, wrote:

If they're Italian sausages I always poke holes in the casings to let
a lot of the fat drain out. What kind are you cooking?



Not sure yet. I am a prepper more than a cook. For example, sometimes I'll buy a bucket of Wendy's chile and add things to it. I will saute onion, green pepper, jalapeno, mushrooms, and roma tomatoes in olive oil then add it to the bucket of chile. I will make some rice to last 6 days, same as the chile mix will last, and I will eat it every day. I also broil or buy pre cooked chicken or pork at Whole Foods to cut up a bit and add to the mix each day. I am not touting Wendy's chile, but I used that recipe of mine as an example of my prepping method. Some people say they can't eat the same thing 6 days in a row, yet they eat sausage or bacon with eggs every day. I like the prepping method. If a mistake is made and things don't turn out so good it's just for one day. The base, which is the chile or the beans I'll make, that will be good and will be used every day, but what is added can be switched up day to day. I like the prepping method.

I want to saute a similar spice mix for the beans and boiled or simmered sausage. As to what kind I'm using, I think I'll go with sweet Italian. But I also like regular pork sausage. I agree about poking holes in. I am not anti fat, anti sugar, anti salt, or any of that - but I do like to keep it to a minimum sometimes. Like when I make the Wendy's mix, I know there's a lot of salt in it, so I don't add any.

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage? Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

[email protected][_2_] 23-11-2017 12:29 AM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage?

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.

Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.


[email protected] 23-11-2017 04:07 AM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 7:29:04 PM UTC-5, wrote:

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.


Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.


If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.



Thanks, I'm going to make the beans and sausage early next week. I'm still eating the 6 day spread I made Wednesday. I won't go into it, but it's pretty good.

Now, as for browning the sausage, I won't argue it might taste better that way, but I'll be using it in the beans (either great northern or kidney, always done to near mush), so I'll probably pass on the browning because I'm a lazy guy and I'll have less pan to wash. Appreciate the advice though.

Now speaking of beans, I have a very simple recipe my Arab grandparents used to make. It is not found in most Arab cook books because it came from Arabs who landed in Brazil back in the 20s or so. It's so simple it's incredible. My grandmother used clarified butter for almost all cooking. I use the bottled type from Trader Joe's. Regular butter is ok too. Below is the recipe, and the bean to meat ratio can stay regardless of the amount you make.

5 ingredients only:

Kidney beans (the light red ones)
Beef roast
Butter
Garlic
Dried Mint

Also rice, which I don't include as an actual ingredient. Instructions below:

Put 1 pound light kidney beans in a big pot with a 1 pound roast - chuck or sirloin is good. My grandmother used lamb. Too hard to find, so I go with beef.

Cover with 6 cups of water and bring to a boil. Lower and cover and simmer for 2 to 3 hours, checking on it now and then. My grandmother let the meat sit in the beans all the way till it was breaking apart, which was great - but I take the meat out at about the 2 hour mark because I want to add it daily to the finished product.

This is so easy and simple it's incredible. While the beans are cooking, take a bunch of raw garlic and mince it well. The amount is up to you. When the beans are done, put them on the back burner and get out a skillet. In the skillet put 4 tablespoons of butter and melt it down. Add the garlic and stir for about 5 minutes. Keep your eyes on it so it does not brown. It will ruin the mix.

When the garlic and butter mix is done, add it to the beans along with a good palm-ful of dried mint. Stir the mint and butter and garlic mix into the beans and that's it. Put on rice and eat. Since I do the prep thing I don't make the rice every day or eat it traditional style with the beans over the rice. I cut up some meat each day along with maybe some spinach or parsley, which is not necessary but adds nutrition and does not destroy the flavor. I put the beans, spinach, and meat, in a bowl and place a handful of cooked rice in the center. I cover the bowl and micro for 3 minutes. And that's it. One day for cooking, 7 meals overall with little or no work.

Oh, one more thing, I agree with you on the micro power, but my unit is cheap and not so powerful. So when it comes to using the micro it's up to whoever owns it and knows it. Thanks for your post.

Now,

[email protected] 23-11-2017 08:07 AM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 

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jmcquown[_2_] 23-11-2017 04:16 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On 11/22/2017 7:29 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage?

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.

Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.

Yep, Italian sausage in the casing (tasty for sure) definitely benefits
from a bit of browning.

Jill

U.S. Janet B. 23-11-2017 04:25 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:16:03 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 11/22/2017 7:29 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage?

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.

Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.

Yep, Italian sausage in the casing (tasty for sure) definitely benefits
from a bit of browning.

Jill


I thought the recommended way to cook sausages was to put a bit of
water in the pan (1/4 inch maybe) put the sausages in on medium, cook
and turn until the water is gone, sausages are firm and browned. Not
sure where I picked that up
Janet US

jmcquown[_2_] 23-11-2017 05:36 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On 11/23/2017 11:25 AM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:
On Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:16:03 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 11/22/2017 7:29 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage?

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.

Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.

Yep, Italian sausage in the casing (tasty for sure) definitely benefits
from a bit of browning.

Jill


I thought the recommended way to cook sausages was to put a bit of
water in the pan (1/4 inch maybe) put the sausages in on medium, cook
and turn until the water is gone, sausages are firm and browned. Not
sure where I picked that up
Janet US

I've simmered Italian sausages (pricked). I've grilled them. I would
like a bit of browning and your method suggests a combination of both
simmering and browning. :)

The original post doesn't really make sense to me. First mentions
cooking beans, then sausage, then rice. Oh, are we talking beans and
rice with sausage? Hard to tell.

Jill

[email protected] 23-11-2017 07:04 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Thu, 23 Nov 2017 09:25:01 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:

On Thu, 23 Nov 2017 11:16:03 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 11/22/2017 7:29 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 4:54:57 PM UTC-6, wrote:

I will poke holes in the sausage. I want the casings on. But my question is, at a low simmer, how long should I cook the sausage?

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.

Also, when the mix is made and put in the fridge to be brought out each day I put it in a bowl and add some rice in the middle, on top, and put a paper towel over it and microwave it for 3 minutes or so. So I don't think I'll have to cook the sausage to death. So, in your opinion, what is a safe time for cooking the raw sausage? Every day when the bean and veggie mix is brought out I add however much sausage I want to the individual plate, I don't put it in all at once. I gauge what I eat. My uncle used to call me "the measuring man."

Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also heat it
up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe 60% power.

Thanks for your response and any to come after this. Yes, I think I'll be using Italian sweet sausage or regular pork, uncooked of course, and they will be thick juicy ones, not the small links.

TJ

If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.

Yep, Italian sausage in the casing (tasty for sure) definitely benefits
from a bit of browning.

Jill


I thought the recommended way to cook sausages was to put a bit of
water in the pan (1/4 inch maybe) put the sausages in on medium, cook
and turn until the water is gone, sausages are firm and browned. Not
sure where I picked that up
Janet US


That works okay when cooking a small quantity so there's only one
layer to saute, however that method doesn't eliminate the salt.
I usually simmer a couple dozen so I cover them with water to
simmer... dump the water... then I use two pans for browning in a wee
bit of olive oil. I see no reason to poke holes in the casings, just
don't boil them. When I make my own sausage I control the salt
content and I rarely stuff casings, it's much simpler to make
patties/meatballs.

[email protected][_2_] 23-11-2017 07:36 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Thursday, November 23, 2017 at 1:04:45 PM UTC-6, Sheldon wrote:

On Thu, 23 Nov 2017 09:25:01 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:

I thought the recommended way to cook sausages was to put a bit of
water in the pan (1/4 inch maybe) put the sausages in on medium, cook
and turn until the water is gone, sausages are firm and browned. Not
sure where I picked that up
Janet US


That works okay when cooking a small quantity so there's only one
layer to saute, however that method doesn't eliminate the salt.
I usually simmer a couple dozen so I cover them with water to
simmer... dump the water... then I use two pans for browning in a wee
bit of olive oil. I see no reason to poke holes in the casings, just
don't boil them. When I make my own sausage I control the salt
content and I rarely stuff casings, it's much simpler to make
patties/meatballs.


_Italian sausages_ are definitely benefited with a few holes poked into
their casings. That is unless you like eating all that pork fat. Hey,
you can suck on your shirt later if you get hungry after it has splattered
that grease all over the front.

Even if _Italian sausages_ are grilled outdoor they benefit from being
poked with several holes. It's that fat thing I talked about in the
previous paragraph.


cshenk 23-11-2017 07:37 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
wrote in rec.food.cooking:

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 7:29:04 PM UTC-5,
wrote:

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.


Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also
heat it up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe
60% power.


If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.



Thanks, I'm going to make the beans and sausage early next week. I'm
still eating the 6 day spread I made Wednesday. I won't go into it,
but it's pretty good.

Now, as for browning the sausage, I won't argue it might taste better
that way, but I'll be using it in the beans (either great northern or
kidney, always done to near mush), so I'll probably pass on the
browning because I'm a lazy guy and I'll have less pan to wash.
Appreciate the advice though.

Now speaking of beans, I have a very simple recipe my Arab
grandparents used to make. It is not found in most Arab cook books
because it came from Arabs who landed in Brazil back in the 20s or
so. It's so simple it's incredible. My grandmother used clarified
butter for almost all cooking. I use the bottled type from Trader
Joe's. Regular butter is ok too. Below is the recipe, and the bean
to meat ratio can stay regardless of the amount you make.

5 ingredients only:

Kidney beans (the light red ones)
Beef roast
Butter
Garlic
Dried Mint

Also rice, which I don't include as an actual ingredient.
Instructions below:

Put 1 pound light kidney beans in a big pot with a 1 pound roast -
chuck or sirloin is good. My grandmother used lamb. Too hard to
find, so I go with beef.

Cover with 6 cups of water and bring to a boil. Lower and cover and
simmer for 2 to 3 hours, checking on it now and then. My grandmother
let the meat sit in the beans all the way till it was breaking apart,
which was great - but I take the meat out at about the 2 hour mark
because I want to add it daily to the finished product.

This is so easy and simple it's incredible. While the beans are
cooking, take a bunch of raw garlic and mince it well. The amount is
up to you. When the beans are done, put them on the back burner and
get out a skillet. In the skillet put 4 tablespoons of butter and
melt it down. Add the garlic and stir for about 5 minutes. Keep
your eyes on it so it does not brown. It will ruin the mix.

When the garlic and butter mix is done, add it to the beans along
with a good palm-ful of dried mint. Stir the mint and butter and
garlic mix into the beans and that's it. Put on rice and eat. Since
I do the prep thing I don't make the rice every day or eat it
traditional style with the beans over the rice. I cut up some meat
each day along with maybe some spinach or parsley, which is not
necessary but adds nutrition and does not destroy the flavor. I put
the beans, spinach, and meat, in a bowl and place a handful of cooked
rice in the center. I cover the bowl and micro for 3 minutes. And
that's it. One day for cooking, 7 meals overall with little or no
work.

Oh, one more thing, I agree with you on the micro power, but my unit
is cheap and not so powerful. So when it comes to using the micro
it's up to whoever owns it and knows it. Thanks for your post.

Now,


Hi Jaz,

I like generally the recipe but the mint simply feels wrong to me?
Different traditions likely there.

--


Dave Smith[_1_] 23-11-2017 10:26 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On 2017-11-23 2:36 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, November 23, 2017 at 1:04:45 PM UTC-6, Sheldon wrote:


_Italian sausages_ are definitely benefited with a few holes poked into
their casings. That is unless you like eating all that pork fat. Hey,
you can suck on your shirt later if you get hungry after it has splattered
that grease all over the front.

Even if _Italian sausages_ are grilled outdoor they benefit from being
poked with several holes. It's that fat thing I talked about in the
previous paragraph.


Poking holes in the sausages when cooking lets a lot of the fat and
juice out while they cooking, so they don't spray you with hot liquid
when you cut into them at the dinner table, or worse, when you bite into
one.

[email protected] 23-11-2017 11:06 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
On Thursday, November 23, 2017 at 2:37:52 PM UTC-5, cshenk wrote:
wrote in rec.food.cooking:

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 7:29:04 PM UTC-5,
wrote:

At a low simmer I would cook them about 30 minutes.


Usually, when I heat up something along that line I will do also
heat it up for about 3 minutes or so but at a reduced power. Maybe
60% power.


If you feel like it, after those sausages have simmered until done,
throw them in a hot skillet for just a few minutes for a bit of
browning. Will improve the taste and crisp up the skin.



Thanks, I'm going to make the beans and sausage early next week. I'm
still eating the 6 day spread I made Wednesday. I won't go into it,
but it's pretty good.

Now, as for browning the sausage, I won't argue it might taste better
that way, but I'll be using it in the beans (either great northern or
kidney, always done to near mush), so I'll probably pass on the
browning because I'm a lazy guy and I'll have less pan to wash.
Appreciate the advice though.

Now speaking of beans, I have a very simple recipe my Arab
grandparents used to make. It is not found in most Arab cook books
because it came from Arabs who landed in Brazil back in the 20s or
so. It's so simple it's incredible. My grandmother used clarified
butter for almost all cooking. I use the bottled type from Trader
Joe's. Regular butter is ok too. Below is the recipe, and the bean
to meat ratio can stay regardless of the amount you make.

5 ingredients only:

Kidney beans (the light red ones)
Beef roast
Butter
Garlic
Dried Mint

Also rice, which I don't include as an actual ingredient.
Instructions below:

Put 1 pound light kidney beans in a big pot with a 1 pound roast -
chuck or sirloin is good. My grandmother used lamb. Too hard to
find, so I go with beef.

Cover with 6 cups of water and bring to a boil. Lower and cover and
simmer for 2 to 3 hours, checking on it now and then. My grandmother
let the meat sit in the beans all the way till it was breaking apart,
which was great - but I take the meat out at about the 2 hour mark
because I want to add it daily to the finished product.

This is so easy and simple it's incredible. While the beans are
cooking, take a bunch of raw garlic and mince it well. The amount is
up to you. When the beans are done, put them on the back burner and
get out a skillet. In the skillet put 4 tablespoons of butter and
melt it down. Add the garlic and stir for about 5 minutes. Keep
your eyes on it so it does not brown. It will ruin the mix.

When the garlic and butter mix is done, add it to the beans along
with a good palm-ful of dried mint. Stir the mint and butter and
garlic mix into the beans and that's it. Put on rice and eat. Since
I do the prep thing I don't make the rice every day or eat it
traditional style with the beans over the rice. I cut up some meat
each day along with maybe some spinach or parsley, which is not
necessary but adds nutrition and does not destroy the flavor. I put
the beans, spinach, and meat, in a bowl and place a handful of cooked
rice in the center. I cover the bowl and micro for 3 minutes. And
that's it. One day for cooking, 7 meals overall with little or no
work.

Oh, one more thing, I agree with you on the micro power, but my unit
is cheap and not so powerful. So when it comes to using the micro
it's up to whoever owns it and knows it. Thanks for your post.

Now,


Hi Jaz,

I like generally the recipe but the mint simply feels wrong to me?
Different traditions likely there.

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I understand. Some recipes don't sound good on paper. How about hummus for instance? Chick peas and sesame paste? How did that come about? Probably by accident, both foods sitting separately on a plate and coming together and someone going, "Hmmm, not bad." I hate chick peas. I don't like beans of any kind that are too firm. But I love them boiled almost to mash. I guess it's the broth. I know the mint in the beans sounds odd but it really adds a unique flavor that is not overbearing, depending of course on how much one adds. That's another benefit to prepping. Make the beans and meat then place them separately in the fridge. Take a little meat and cut up and add the beans and rice. Now you can add just a taste of mint, and if you don't like it all you've lost is one small meal, not an entire pot of food.

TJ

[email protected] 23-11-2017 11:17 PM

Boiling or simmering raw sausage links
 
Sorry to carry on, but speaking of hummus, I made some today, good for the next 6 days, 7 meals in all. I use two cans of progresso chick peas, rinsed. While rinsing I rub the beans between my hands and the skins peel off. I then dump the water into a strainer sitting over a pot. I do this about 6 times till nearly all the skins are off. Then I put the beans in a pot and simmer them even though they are already cooked.

While the beans are heating I dice up about 6 big cloves of garlic and add them to some salt in a mortar (or is it a pestle?). I go the old fashioned way. It takes about 200 turns of the wrist to grind the garlic into butter. Then I add about 7 tablespoons of tahini to the beans - 2 20 oz cans, 40 oz in all. I stir it till it hardens. Then I add half a lemon and stir some more. Then more lemon. Then some cold water till I get the consistency I want. I then remove the beans from the heat and mash down with a potato masher. Then I removed the mashed beans from the pot and put them on a huge plate and fine mash them with a fork. I put the beans in a rubbermaid container and add the tahini mix spoonful by spoonful till I get the right consistency. I have to admit it, I do make pretty good hummus. Mine is not so much a dip as a meal. Kind of thick. Each day I put some on a plate along with some pre cooked chicken breast from Whole Foods, some oranges and cucumbers cut up along with some cold cooked sweet potatoes surrounded with olives. I eat it with toasted flat bread. It's a great dish if I must say so myself. I don't use much chicken. A half pound will give me 4 or 5 portions when put on a plate with hummus. I also put score the top of the hummus with a fork and drizzle some olive oil onto it along with some cayenne pepper. It's a pain in the butt making it, but once done it's good for 6 days, 7 meals in all, with no work other than slinging the stuff together on a plate. Thanks for bearing with me on this.

TJ



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