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Old 29-05-2010, 11:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

Forgot to soak my dried black eyed beans overnight yesterday . I wondering
what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to cook them
this evening? Thanks for advice



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Old 29-05-2010, 11:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time


"john hamilton" wrote in message
...
Forgot to soak my dried black eyed beans overnight yesterday . I
wondering what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to
cook them this evening? Thanks for advice

Bring them to the boil in plenty of water (*no salt*) and after a couple of
minutes, take them off the heat and cover the pan with a tight-fitting lid.
After about an hour, they will be ready but I would leave them until you
need to cook them in your recipe.
I always soak beans this way as it is much more reliable than the
traditional cold soak.
Graham


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Old 29-05-2010, 01:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

On 2010-05-29, john hamilton wrote:

what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to cook them
this evening? Thanks for advice


Soaking dried beans is a waste of time. It's totally unnecessary and
physically changes the relative texture between the bean skin and the
inner pulp. Unless you actually like a soft pulp in a tough skin,
just boil the damn things and be done with it.

nb
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Old 29-05-2010, 02:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How do you soak and cook black beans? - Dried Beans -- Minimumreasonable soaking time

On May 29, 5:17*am, notbob wrote:
On 2010-05-29, john hamilton wrote:

what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to cook them
this evening? * *Thanks for advice


Soaking dried beans is a waste of time. *It's totally unnecessary and
physically changes the relative texture between the bean skin and the
inner pulp. *Unless you actually like a soft pulp in a tough skin,
just boil the damn things and be done with it.


How do you soak and cook black beans?

nb


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Old 29-05-2010, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

notbob wrote:

On 2010-05-29, john hamilton wrote:


what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to cook them
this evening? Thanks for advice


Soaking dried beans is a waste of time. It's totally unnecessary and
physically changes the relative texture between the bean skin and the
inner pulp. Unless you actually like a soft pulp in a tough skin,
just boil the damn things and be done with it.


Not my experience. For beans to cook to tenderness without too
many of them falling apart, they must usually be pre-soaked.
This effect is most marked (in my experience) with garbanzos,
which are a perfect texture if soaked overnight, then boiled
about 18 minutes at sea level. If you want completely intact,
but tender, garbanzos, say for use in a salad.

But there are many things that affect bean cooking, including
obviously elevation and pH of the water, as well as whether
and when they are salted, that I'm sure people have different
experiences with pre-soaking.

Stevw


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Old 29-05-2010, 03:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How do you soak and cook black beans? - Dried Beans -- Minimumreasonable soaking time

Manda Ruby wrote:

On May 29, 5:17*am, notbob wrote:


Soaking dried beans is a waste of time. *It's totally unnecessary and
physically changes the relative texture between the bean skin and the
inner pulp. *Unless you actually like a soft pulp in a tough skin,
just boil the damn things and be done with it.


How do you soak and cook black beans?


Black beans are among the least necessary to pre-soak, but
one can go either way with them. What you truly don't
want to pre-soak is lentils -- green, brown, or orange.


Steve
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Old 29-05-2010, 03:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

J. Clarke wrote:

There's no "acceptable minimum time". The longer they soak the less time
they have to cook. If you're willing to cook them 2-4 hours then you
don't need to soak them at all.


Yes, for me it's less hassle to pre-soak and then have a shorter
cooking time, since cooking them requires some ongoing attention and
soaking does not. Rarely do sea-level beans require more
than 45 minutes to cook if they've been soaked overnight.

Steve
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Old 29-05-2010, 03:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

Steve wrote on Sat, 29 May 2010 13:55:23 +0000 (UTC):

On 2010-05-29, john hamilton wrote:


what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able
to cook them this evening? Thanks for advice


Soaking dried beans is a waste of time. It's totally
unnecessary and physically changes the relative texture
between the bean skin and the inner pulp. Unless you
actually like a soft pulp in a tough skin, just boil the damn
things and be done with it.


Not my experience. For beans to cook to tenderness without
too many of them falling apart, they must usually be
pre-soaked. This effect is most marked (in my experience) with
garbanzos, which are a perfect texture if soaked overnight,
then boiled about 18 minutes at sea level. If you want
completely intact, but tender, garbanzos, say for use in a
salad.


What's wrong with using "intact, tender", canned garbanzos (chickpeas,
chana etc.) in a salad? They make pretty good hummus too and are really
quite cheap, especially store brands.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 29-05-2010, 03:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

James Silverton wrote:

Steve wrote on Sat, 29 May 2010 13:55:23 +0000 (UTC):


Not my experience. For beans to cook to tenderness without
too many of them falling apart, they must usually be
pre-soaked. This effect is most marked (in my experience) with
garbanzos, which are a perfect texture if soaked overnight,
then boiled about 18 minutes at sea level. If you want
completely intact, but tender, garbanzos, say for use in a
salad.


What's wrong with using "intact, tender", canned garbanzos (chickpeas,
chana etc.) in a salad? They make pretty good hummus too and are really
quite cheap, especially store brands.


Nothing at all. I like TJ's organic garbanzos in cans, and
it took me some amount of trial and error before I could cook
garbanzos at home that consistently have as good or better texture.

One reason to cook them at home is to get lower sodium. Another
is cost, but that's somewhat marginal, depending on your budget.

Steve
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Old 29-05-2010, 03:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

Steve wrote on Sat, 29 May 2010 14:30:52 +0000 (UTC):

Steve wrote on Sat, 29 May 2010 13:55:23 +0000 (UTC):


Not my experience. For beans to cook to tenderness without
too many of them falling apart, they must usually be
pre-soaked. This effect is most marked (in my experience)
with garbanzos, which are a perfect texture if soaked
overnight, then boiled about 18 minutes at sea level. If
you want completely intact, but tender, garbanzos, say for
use in a salad.


What's wrong with using "intact, tender", canned garbanzos
(chickpeas, chana etc.) in a salad? They make pretty good
hummus too and are really quite cheap, especially store
brands.


Nothing at all. I like TJ's organic garbanzos in cans, and
it took me some amount of trial and error before I could cook
garbanzos at home that consistently have as good or better
texture.


One reason to cook them at home is to get lower sodium.
Another is cost, but that's somewhat marginal, depending on
your budget.


I don't think canned garbanzos include a lot of sodium after rinsing
once or twice but I've no statistics on that except that I know the
liquid in the can is quite salty.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not



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Old 29-05-2010, 03:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

James Silverton wrote:

Steve wrote on Sat, 29 May 2010 14:30:52 +0000 (UTC):

I don't think canned garbanzos include a lot of sodium after rinsing
once or twice but I've no statistics on that except that I know the
liquid in the can is quite salty.


Depends on what you're doing with them. I like to eat low sodium,
and some recipes I make from garbanzos have significant sodium from
other ingredients like preserve lemon, or harissa; in these recipes
I want completely unsalted garbanzos.

For just putting them on a salad, low-salt or even standard-salt
canned garbanzos are fine.


Steve
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Old 29-05-2010, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

On May 29, 10:46*am, (Steve Pope) wrote:
James Silverton wrote:
Steve *wrote *on Sat, 29 May 2010 14:30:52 +0000 (UTC):


I don't think canned garbanzos include a lot of sodium after rinsing
once or twice but I've no statistics on that except that I know the
liquid in the can is quite salty.


Depends on what you're doing with them. *I like to eat low sodium,
and some recipes I make from garbanzos have significant sodium from
other ingredients like preserve lemon, or harissa; in these recipes
I want completely unsalted garbanzos.

For just putting them on a salad, low-salt or even standard-salt
canned garbanzos are fine.

Steve


if canned garbanzo beans with salt what about rinsing them? will that
remove some/most/all salt?
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Old 29-05-2010, 04:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dried Beans -- Minimum reasonable soaking time

john hamilton wrote:
Forgot to soak my dried black eyed beans overnight yesterday . I wondering
what would be a minimum time to soak them today, to be able to cook them
this evening? Thanks for advice




I think with BEP's you can get by without soaking them at all. Just
start out cooking them very slowly, turn the fire up after they have
expanded.

I would start them soaking in warm water this morning and then just
go for it when I was ready to cook them, and not worry about it.

Bob


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