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Old 23-12-2013, 08:30 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:
: W. Baker wrote:
:
: : Pinnekj?tt http://www.matsiden.no/artikkel_head.asp?a_id=446
: : Skip the text, just see the picture. Salted, dried lamb ribs-
: : then soaked for a day or so. Steamed, not boiled, although it could be
: : just boiled if it hasn't been soaked to get out (most of) the salt.
: : Mashed rutabaga/kohlrabi is always on the side, potatoes for those who
: : can eat them (not me). Was introduced to it by my mother-in-law about 46
: : years ago and had it for Christmas ever since, except for one turkey
: : dinner in the US :-)
: Personally,I never particularly like rutabega. My question is, we
: sometimes call them Swedes in the US. How come they are also eaten in
: Norway:-)

: We also eat Berlinerkranser (small cookies) - Wienerbr?d, which you call
: Danish for about the same reason: introduced in Denmark by Austrian pastry
: chefs :-)


I like the international or at least inte-European flavor to those
things:-)
aren't Berliner Krantz the little round cookies with , wht looks like a
girls hat in frosting on top? Kid of white wit blue streamers?

I di dnot know about the Danish pastry, which I used to enjoy when well
made. I tried it once, and what a pain withall the rolling, folding ,
refrigeratinge, rollings, adding butter, folding, etc until it is all
wonderful flakes. I did not know it came form austrian bakers, but I do
know that Austirian bakers can make remarkable pastres which I can't
eat:-(

: K?lrabi has been grown here forever -"the orange of the North" because of
: its Vitamin C content.

: Some dialects name the bird Carduelis chloris a Swede :-)
:
: Also, any sauce with those lamb ribs or just plain, salty steamed?

: Just plain. Some of the - I lack the word - the fluid in the bottom of the
: pan is often served as a sauce.

Pan juices would work. Do you add any herbs or other flavorings to this
besides all that salt in the lamb ribs?


Wendy

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Old 23-12-2013, 08:32 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

Todd wrote:
: On 12/21/2013 12:47 PM, Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:
: Todd wrote:
:
: Hi All,
:
: What are you cooking for Christmas dinner? I haven't
: decided yet and would love to know what you guys
: are making!
:
: -T
:
: Pinnekj?tt http://www.matsiden.no/artikkel_head.asp?a_id=446
: Skip the text, just see the picture. Salted, dried lamb ribs-
: then soaked for a day or so. Steamed, not boiled, although it could be just
: boiled if it hasn't been soaked to get out (most of) the salt.
: Mashed rutabaga/kohlrabi is always on the side, potatoes for those who can
: eat them (not me). Was introduced to it by my mother-in-law about 46 years
: ago and had it for Christmas ever since, except for one turkey dinner in the
: US :-)


: Hi Bj?rn,

: Thank you!

: Way over my head though.

: Since being inducted into the pin cushion
: clubs, my tastes changes and I suddenly can't
: stand lamb and I have such fond memories as
: a child smelling it cooking at Christmas.

: How does it taste?

: -T

Lambmay be a bit fatty but you include fat in your diet. why did it seem
to go out of favor with you when you changed your diet for diabetes? I
love lamb chops, but ,well, they cost a pretty penny. Lamb stew is also
great.

Wendy
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Old 23-12-2013, 09:02 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
I wasnt calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
friends to eat..period.


That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
to be alone on Christmas?


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Old 23-12-2013, 09:13 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
I wasnt calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
friends to eat..period.


That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
to be alone on Christmas?


Maybe to you, Christmas is a time for a lot of people to get together. It
isn't for me or my family. Just because you think something should be that
way, doesn't mean others think that way.



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Old 23-12-2013, 09:44 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

On Mon, 23 Dec 2013 13:02:23 -0800, in alt.food.diabetic, Todd
wrote:

On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
I wasnt calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
friends to eat..period.


That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
to be alone on Christmas?


Do you not understand? For a non Christian it is just another day.
It isn't like being alone on a holiday. It is not a holiday for
Wendy. You really are being insensitive.


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Old 24-12-2013, 01:54 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

On 12/22/2013 8:31 PM, Todd wrote:

Virtually everyone around you will be celebrating
with loved ones and I did not want you to be lonely.


Could you be any more insufferable? If you look up "pompous ass" in the
dictionary I would expect to see your photo beside it.

You show an impressive amount of ignorance in lifestyles that aren't
within your own little world. You need to get out more.

--
DreadfulBitch

I intend to live forever....so far, so good.
......Steven Wright
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Old 24-12-2013, 02:28 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

Todd wrote:
: On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
: I wasn?t calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
: friends to eat..period.

: That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
: Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
: secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
: your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
: out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
: involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
: to be alone on Christmas?
You are celebrating something that has caused a great deal of pain to Jews
over the millenia. We really don't want to share your holiday, bt, at
this time, some 70 or so years after the hend of the Holocaust, we are
happy you are enjoying your holiday, with all its religious and secular
aspects, but do let us enjoy our own and we can have nice and happy meals
together on totally secular dys and on occasions like the US thanksgiving
which really is clelebrated as E Pluribus Unem with a central turkey adn
side dishes form many of the cultures that have become part of the US over
the centuries.

New Years eve and Day are also time we can celebrate together or even just
a Monday night in january when it is dark early and cold, so good
companionship adn shared food and drink woudl be welcome.

Wendy

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Old 24-12-2013, 02:58 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

On 12/23/2013 8:28 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Todd wrote:
: On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
: I wasn?t calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
: friends to eat..period.

: That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
: Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
: secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
: your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
: out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
: involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
: to be alone on Christmas?
You are celebrating something that has caused a great deal of pain to Jews
over the millenia. We really don't want to share your holiday, bt, at
this time, some 70 or so years after the hend of the Holocaust, we are
happy you are enjoying your holiday, with all its religious and secular
aspects, but do let us enjoy our own and we can have nice and happy meals
together on totally secular dys and on occasions like the US thanksgiving
which really is clelebrated as E Pluribus Unem with a central turkey adn
side dishes form many of the cultures that have become part of the US over
the centuries.

New Years eve and Day are also time we can celebrate together or even just
a Monday night in january when it is dark early and cold, so good
companionship adn shared food and drink woudl be welcome.

Wendy


My thoughts on Christmas

We have had dinner with Christian friends on Christmas, but it's not a
holiday we celebrate in our home. When we are with our friends we are
really celebrating being with them and not their holiday. Most of them
aren't celebrating in any religious manner anyway. We send them
Christmas cards and we wish people a Merry Christmas, because we
recognize their holiday.

I find very little religion in Christmas as its celebrated in the US.
It seems to be getting more and more commercially oriented every year.
I do like the music (the best selling Christmas song was written by an
immigrant Jew) and I fondly recall the spirit of peace on earth and
goodwill to mankind that seems to have gotten lost in the scramble for
bargains on Black Friday at the stores.

When I was a teenager living near NYC, we used to go to St. Patrick's
Cathedral on Christmas Eve and stand outside during midnight mass where
speakers broadcast the beautiful music. None of us were Catholic or even
Christian for that matter, but we appreciated the "concert" for it's
musical value.

When Wendy and I celebrate holidays, there is *always* an element of
religious practice involved. Even Chanukah, which has taken on a lot
more importance than it really has, is celebrated by lighting candles
every night and saying special blessings, in Hebrew, as we light them.
The kids, who are expecting gifts, know that they come after, the
candles are lit and the religious portion of the holiday is observed.

Christianity, historically, has not been kind to the rest of the world
and anyone who forgets the forced conversions, murder and evil treatment
of those who did not adhere to the Church is denying history just as
many Muslims deny the Holocaust. Wendy's feelings are very understandable.


--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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Old 24-12-2013, 04:35 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?


"Karen" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Dec 2013 13:02:23 -0800, in alt.food.diabetic, Todd
wrote:

On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
I wasn't calling for Jews to celebrate with Christians..I was inviting
friends to eat..period.


That is what I was getting at too. What did you think I meant?
Ambush them with holy water? I was only talking about the
secular portion. You are celebrating, have lots of food,
your friends of another faith are not, invite them in. Pig
out together. Watch the Packers lose (again). No proselytizing
involved -- just friendship. Would you really want your friends
to be alone on Christmas?


Do you not understand? For a non Christian it is just another day.
It isn't like being alone on a holiday. It is not a holiday for
Wendy. You really are being insensitive.


Thanks! You summed it up a lot better than I did. I think I was just so
****ed off that I kept on rambling.

But it reminded me of those people who get ticked off when stores are open
on holidays. They say that everyone deserves a day off! I guess they are
forgetting that tons of people from health care to military to law officers
must work on holidays. And people who work in stores generally know that
they won't get to choose their days off and some of them even WANT to work
on holidays. Maybe they want the extra money they are likely to be paid.
Or maybe even if they do celebrate the holiday, they are alone where they
live and would rather just work to take their mind off of their family. Or
maybe like you said, to them it is just another day.

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Old 24-12-2013, 04:37 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 12/23/2013 11:23 AM, KROM wrote:
I know ya meant well.... but it was a bit irksome to say she HAD to do
something for the day instead of just saying your sure her friends would
love to have her if she wanted a good meal just as I'm sure she invites
friends over for meals despite their faiths.


Hi Krom,

I really was only suggesting not commanding. You know how
friends say "you have to ..." only a suggestion, not a
command. You said the same thing I was trying to say,
only did not manager to offend anyone. My writing
must really suck. :'(

You and your family have a blessed and loving Merry Christmas.

-T

I am somewhat afraid to wish the rest of you one, but, what the hell,
here goes, have a Blessed and Loving Merry Christmas.


Friends say, "You have to..."? Mine don't. They might say things like,
"Have you tried...?" But they would never tell me that I had to do something
unless I really had to. Like... "You have to move! There's a car coming!"
But in that case they likely would just say, "Move!" in a freaked out
fashion.



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Old 24-12-2013, 01:00 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

W. Baker wrote:

Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:
: W. Baker wrote:
:
: : Pinnekj?tt http://www.matsiden.no/artikkel_head.asp?a_id=446
: : Skip the text, just see the picture. Salted, dried lamb ribs-
: : then soaked for a day or so. Steamed, not boiled, although it could
: : be just boiled if it hasn't been soaked to get out (most of) the
: : salt. Mashed rutabaga/kohlrabi is always on the side, potatoes for
: : those who can eat them (not me). Was introduced to it by my
: : mother-in-law about 46 years ago and had it for Christmas ever
: : since, except for one turkey dinner in the US :-)
: Personally,I never particularly like rutabega. My question is, we
: sometimes call them Swedes in the US. How come they are also eaten in
: Norway:-)

: We also eat Berlinerkranser (small cookies) - Wienerbr?d, which you call
: Danish for about the same reason: introduced in Denmark by Austrian
: pastry chefs :-)


I like the international or at least inte-European flavor to those
things:-)
aren't Berliner Krantz the little round cookies with , wht looks like a
girls hat in frosting on top? Kid of white wit blue streamers?


Our version is a cookie formed into a Q- or omega-shape - no frosting.

:
: Also, any sauce with those lamb ribs or just plain, salty steamed?

: Just plain. Some of the - I lack the word - the fluid in the bottom of
: the pan is often served as a sauce.

Pan juices would work. Do you add any herbs or other flavorings to this
besides all that salt in the lamb ribs?


Thanks, both of you - no, maybe some preserved pumpkin (diced, boiled with a
little vinegar and a piece of ginger. Always homemade, never saw it in
stores)

14:00 - down to check on the steaming of the pinnekjøtt. Grandchildren and
other guests have had the traditional "rice pudding" risgrøt, with raspberry
juice drink, Ronja got the almond. I tested before eating, 7.2 - oops.
Better build a salad instead. The rice would have sent it sky high.


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Old 24-12-2013, 05:55 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

Maybe to you, Christmas is a time for a lot of people to get together. It
isn't for me or my family. Just because you think something should be
that way, doesn't mean others think that way.


That could be said for any celebration, so people should never post about
any celebration because others might not be celebrating? Give me a break,
and December 25th is CHRISTMAS which over 2 billion people celebrate so of
course it will be talked about.

Cheri

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Old 24-12-2013, 05:59 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"Todd" wrote in message
...

I have decided not to read any of you until after Christmas, except Susan,
since this whole thing has turned into a ****ing match with one versus the
other. I won't have it!!!

Cheri

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Old 24-12-2013, 07:47 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?

On Tue, 24 Dec 2013 09:59:16 -0800, in alt.food.diabetic, "Cheri"
wrote:


"Todd" wrote in message
...

I have decided not to read any of you until after Christmas, except Susan,
since this whole thing has turned into a ****ing match with one versus the
other. I won't have it!!!

Cheri


Sorry Cheri. I want to say though, Merry Christmas from one Central
Valley resident to another. The weather is supposed to be lovely.
Low 60's and sunny.
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Old 24-12-2013, 08:04 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default What's for Christmas Dinner?


"Cheri" wrote in message
...

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

Maybe to you, Christmas is a time for a lot of people to get together.
It isn't for me or my family. Just because you think something should be
that way, doesn't mean others think that way.


That could be said for any celebration, so people should never post about
any celebration because others might not be celebrating? Give me a break,
and December 25th is CHRISTMAS which over 2 billion people celebrate so of
course it will be talked about.


That's not it at all. My point was that just because *you* do something,
don't assume we all do it! And by you, I don't mean you, Cheri because you
didn't do it. And it was really uncalled for to insist that Wendy do what he
does!



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