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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

pltrgyst > wrote
> Cape Cod Bob > wrote


>> Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for example.


> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes.


Wrong.

> You might note that there are no non-stick commercial crepe makers.


Thats because the detail is different with commercial operations.

> All I do on my commercial crepe makers is use clarified butter,


And if you use a non stick, you dont need to use anything at all.

> and there is never the slightest sticking or build-up.


There isnt any that matters with a non stick either.

>> However, Non stick woks do not.


> I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a non-stick wok.


Irrelevant to what also works.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Rod Speed" > wrote in message
...
> pltrgyst > wrote
>> Cape Cod Bob > wrote

>
>>> Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>>> example.

>
>> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes.

>
> Wrong.
>
>> You might note that there are no non-stick commercial crepe makers.

>
> Thats because the detail is different with commercial operations.



What do you mean by "the detail is different"?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Vic Smith" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 07:50:09 -0700 (PDT), Sheldon >
> wrote:
>
>>pltrgyst wrote:
>>> Cape Cod Bob wrote:
>>> >Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>>> >example.
>>>
>>> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes. You might note that
>>> there are
>>> no non-stick commercial crepe makers. All I do on my commercial crepe
>>> makers is
>>> use clarified butter, and there is never the slightest sticking or
>>> build-up.
>>>
>>> >However, Non stick woks do not.
>>>
>>> I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a
>>> non-stick wok.

>>
>>FoodTV personalities cook whatever and with whatever their sponsors
>>(the people who pay them) mandate. Professional kitchens are nothing
>>like FoodTV cartoon kitchens.

>
> My wife is a working cook (her management calls her a "chef" but she
> calls herself a cook) and always gets a laugh when she see TV chefs
> wearing kitchen-unsuitable "chef costumes."
> Especially those with long and wide sleeves designed to pick up
> everything they flap against.
>
> --Vic



......including the flame from the stove burner?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

JoeSpareBedroom > wrote
> Rod Speed > wrote
>> pltrgyst > wrote
>>> Cape Cod Bob > wrote


>>>> Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for example.


>>> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes.


>> Wrong.


>>> You might note that there are no non-stick commercial crepe makers.


>> Thats because the detail is different with commercial operations.


> What do you mean by "the detail is different"?


Most obviously that its used multiple times a day in a commercial
operation and only weekly at most in a home situation. And a
commercial operation has minimum wage monkeys to wash them,
whereas many prefer the lowest cleaning effort for the home etc.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 07:50:09 -0700 (PDT), Sheldon >
wrote:

>pltrgyst wrote:
>> Cape Cod Bob wrote:
>> >Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>> >example.

>>
>> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes. You might note that there are
>> no non-stick commercial crepe makers. All I do on my commercial crepe makers is
>> use clarified butter, and there is never the slightest sticking or build-up.
>>
>> >However, Non stick woks do not.

>>
>> I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a non-stick wok.

>
>FoodTV personalities cook whatever and with whatever their sponsors
>(the people who pay them) mandate. Professional kitchens are nothing
>like FoodTV cartoon kitchens.


My wife is a working cook (her management calls her a "chef" but she
calls herself a cook) and always gets a laugh when she see TV chefs
wearing kitchen-unsuitable "chef costumes."
Especially those with long and wide sleeves designed to pick up
everything they flap against.

--Vic


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 03:14:03 -0400, Cape Cod Bob
> wrote:

>On Sun, 9 Mar 2008 12:10:29 -0400, Peter A >
>wrote:
>
>>You are just being silly. Claiming that a gas stove is necessary for
>>good cooking and that nonstick pans don't have a place in the kitchen
>>just shows your ignorance.

>
>Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>example. However, Non stick woks do not.
>

Not sure which ng you're in, so I'm replying to all. I use my cast
iron pan for crepes, but use a nonstick pan interchangeably with cast
iron for all types of eggs... omelets, scrambled, over easy. But back
in the day when my cast iron pan wasn't as well seasoned, I preferred
nonstick for eggs (and I used it a few times for crepes too).

--
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>Somebody wrote:

> It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
> cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
> wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen.


We may ALL be commuting to work in carts, soon enough. BAD metaphor.
Bad bad bad.


--
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

> Sheldon > wrote:
>
>> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
>> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
>> playing pilgrim.


It's amazing how many people equate expense and quality. It's
especially amazing that such people read misc.consumers.frugal-living.

> You don't have kids or a wife, do you.
>
> It's a great way to get iron into the diet.


Since the iron is buried under a layer of burned grease, I've always
wondered how that would work.

I love cast iron. It lasts forever, cleans easily and is a pleasant
link with my ancestors. Been a long time since I actually cooked, though.

--
Cheers, Bev
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Some people are like Slinkies... Not really good for
anything, but they still bring a smile to your face
when you push them down a flight of stairs.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Apr 14, 2:04*am, aspasia wrote:
> On Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:48:33 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"
>
> > wrote:
> >In article
> >,
> > Sheldon > wrote:

>
> >> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> >> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> >> playing pilgrim.

>
> >You don't have kids or a wife, do you.

>
> >It's a great way to get iron into the diet.

>
> You couldn't HIRE me to use those non-stick coatings which migrate
> into the user's system with bad consequences. *Feh!


Do you have a citation to a refereed scientific journal that describes
those
bad consequences?

Cindy Hamilton
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On Mar 5, 10:18*pm, Nate Nagel > wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
> > Lou Decruss wrote:

>
> >>Sheldon wrote:

>
> >>>Kenneth wrote:

>
> >>>>I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
> >>>>always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
> >>>>want of a better word), silly.

>
> >>>>In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
> >>>>between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
> >>>>carefully seasoned for years.

>
> >>>>Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
> >>>>cookware.

>
> >>>>Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
> >>>>members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
> >>>>find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
> >>>>comparison.

>
> >>>>As has been my experience, they could detect no difference

>
> >>>Except the elderly could no longer lift them.

>
> >>That's how I got some of mine.

>
> >>>I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
> >>>kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.

>
> >>Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp. �

>
> > Thanks for proving my point... those of us with real life experience
> > and measurable IQs don't need to work as fork lifts. *My momma taught
> > me that no one pays much for jackass labor. *That said I have no doubt
> > I can out muscle two of you.

>
> > The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> > and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> > playing pilgrim. *It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
> > cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
> > wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. *I've yet to see a professional
> > kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. *Cast iron cookware makes
> > steel wheel roller skates and wooden golf clubs seem like state of the
> > art. *Cast iron cookware went out of vogue before the Wright Brothers
> > flew at Kitty Hawk, before Edison's light bulb.

>
> Two advantages to cast iron:
>
> 1) thermal mass. *Sometimes that's a benefit, sometimes it's not, but
> sometimes you want even cooking over the ability to heat/cool quickly.
>
> 2) you have to work very, very hard to render a cast iron skillet
> unusable. *You have one, you have a skillet for life. *That appeals to
> my chea^H^H^H^Hfrugal side.
>
> nate
>
> --
> replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


also, they make a fine weapon.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 10:59:26 -0700, z wrote:

>> > wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. *I've yet to see a professional
>> > kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. *Cast iron cookware makes


One of the kitchens I worked in used cast iron as a back up when the
griddle failed.

The primary advantages of cast iron are indestructibility and even heat
distribution. Those can useful characteristics.

I use primarily no-stick stuff, but I get annoyed with the durability
issue. Sometimes I want to be able to use a nice this metal spatula. On
those occasions I'd like to have a cast iron pan, but not with my current
stove, which just sucks. Cast iron and gas stoves are a nice
combination.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:48:33 -0400,

>> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
>> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware


I doubt that Chef Paul Prudhomme and/or Chef Emeril Lagasse would
agree with you since both use and perfected the blackening technique
used world wide. A cast iron skillet would be manditory.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On 14 Apr 2008 23:26:09 +0200, glen stark
> wrote:

>
>
>The primary advantages of cast iron are indestructibility and even heat
>distribution. Those can useful characteristics.


Howdy,

"Even...?"

Put a cast iron pan on a gas flame for a few bit, and then
put some water in the pan.

You can see the pattern of the burner below.

There may be virtues of cast iron, but I would not put "even
heat distribution" on the list.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 18:53:07 -0400, Billy <Hereiam@hotmaildotcom> wrote:

>I doubt that Chef Paul Prudhomme and/or Chef Emeril Lagasse would
>agree with you since both use and perfected the blackening technique
>used world wide. A cast iron skillet would be manditory.


Jeez, please don't mention Lagasse in the same breath as Paul Prudhomme.

-- Larry

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


<aspasia> wrote in message ...

> My cast iron pans served my late mother for her lifetime,
> and have done the same for me, and I hope my children
> will use them after I'm gone. Indestructible!


My favorite cast iron pan was my 85 YO mother's mother's pan.

Talk about seasoning.




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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

I don't use it for everything but I love cast iron.It browns thing much
better than non-stick. And the clean up is surprisingly easy.

bonnie


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Apr 15, 8:13*pm, aspasia wrote:
> On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 09:51:00 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
>
>
>
>
>
> > wrote:
> >On Apr 14, 2:04*am, aspasia wrote:
> >> On Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:48:33 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

>
> >> > wrote:
> >> >In article
> >> >,
> >> > Sheldon > wrote:

>
> >> >> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> >> >> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> >> >> playing pilgrim.

>
> >> >You don't have kids or a wife, do you.

>
> >> >It's a great way to get iron into the diet.

>
> >> You couldn't HIRE me to use those non-stick coatings which migrate
> >> into the user's system with bad consequences. *Feh!

>
> >Do you have a citation to a refereed scientific journal that describes
> >those
> >bad consequences?

>
> >Cindy Hamilton

>
> I hope you don't mind if I suggest you do your own research. *I've
> seen a great deal on-line and in hard media over the years attesting
> to the damage done to people by fumes from these pans. *But that
> material may not rise to the scientific level of assurance you
> require.


Actually, the only things I've seen that seemed remotely credible was:

1. When heated to excess, some types of nonstick coatings can release
fumes that are toxic to birds.

2. If you don't use the nonstick pan like an idiot, you're in no
danger.

I'm really looking for a citation in the New England Journal of
Medicine,
the Lancet, or peer-reviewed toxicology journals. Perhaps I'll see
what I can
find. It seems to me that the burden of proof is on the person making
the
claims, however.

Cindy Hamilton
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Cindy Hamilton wrote:
>
> On Apr 15, 8:13 pm, aspasia wrote:
> > On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 09:51:00 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
> >
> > > wrote:
> > >On Apr 14, 2:04 am, aspasia wrote:
> > >> On Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:48:33 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

> >
> > >> > wrote:
> > >> >In article
> > >> >,
> > >> > Sheldon > wrote:

> >
> > >> >> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> > >> >> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> > >> >> playing pilgrim.

> >
> > >> >You don't have kids or a wife, do you.

> >
> > >> >It's a great way to get iron into the diet.

> >
> > >> You couldn't HIRE me to use those non-stick coatings which migrate
> > >> into the user's system with bad consequences. Feh!

> >
> > >Do you have a citation to a refereed scientific journal that describes
> > >those
> > >bad consequences?

> >
> > >Cindy Hamilton

> >
> > I hope you don't mind if I suggest you do your own research. I've
> > seen a great deal on-line and in hard media over the years attesting
> > to the damage done to people by fumes from these pans. But that
> > material may not rise to the scientific level of assurance you
> > require.

>
> Actually, the only things I've seen that seemed remotely credible was:
>
> 1. When heated to excess, some types of nonstick coatings can release
> fumes that are toxic to birds.
>
> 2. If you don't use the nonstick pan like an idiot, you're in no
> danger.
>
> I'm really looking for a citation in the New England Journal of
> Medicine,
> the Lancet, or peer-reviewed toxicology journals. Perhaps I'll see
> what I can
> find. It seems to me that the burden of proof is on the person making
> the
> claims, however.
>
> Cindy Hamilton


I don't know if this is pertinent or not, but five years ago a
co-worker, who works as a scientist in environmental engineering and
science, shared with me an article from USA Today written by Elizabeth
Weise, "Posted 4/23/2003 10:08 PM - Updated 4/24/2003 1:24 AM". The
title of the article is, "Out of the frying pan, into a fire." I won't
post/share the entire article here because that would be an infringement
of copyright. But for reference, here are a couple of paragraphs quoted
from the article that may help, or perhaps not:

"Last week the Environmental Protection Agency announced concerns
about a widely used chemical called perfluorinated acid. Tests in rats
have shown reduced fetal weight of pups, delays in maturation and kidney
problems - and 92% of Americans tested had trace amounts of it in their
blood. That's because so-called PFOA or its byproducts are used in the
manufacturing process for Teflon and Gore-Tex and can be released as the
original Scotchguard and Stainmaster break down. PFOA also has other
industrial uses."

"This month a paper in the journal Current Biology reported that a
commonly used plastic ingredient called bisphenol A caused abnormal
pregnancies in mice and might cause reproductive problems in people.
Last year a Swedish study found that a flame retardant used in TV sets,
computer circuit boards and casings, foams and fabric called
polybrominated diphenyl ether, or PBDE, is rapidly accumulating in human
breast milk. The chemical is thought to cause thyroid cancer and
possibly neurodevelopmental problems in test animals."

Hope this helps you to find appropriate citations for particular studies
and papers if you're so inclinded.

Sky, who is no scientist and has no "environmental engineering and
science" background <-----disclaimer!

--
Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"Cindy Hamilton" > wrote in message
news:dfde542c-db10-

Actually, the only things I've seen that seemed remotely credible was:

1. When heated to excess, some types of nonstick coatings can release
fumes that are toxic to birds.

2. If you don't use the nonstick pan like an idiot, you're in no
danger.

I'm really looking for a citation in the New England Journal of
Medicine,
the Lancet, or peer-reviewed toxicology journals. Perhaps I'll see
what I can
find. It seems to me that the burden of proof is on the person making
the
claims, however.

Cindy Hamilton

*********************************************8

Unless, of course, if you value your health and your families health.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Apr 16, 7:27*pm, Sky > wrote:
> Cindy Hamilton wrote:
>
> > On Apr 15, 8:13 pm, aspasia wrote:
> > > On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 09:51:00 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton

>
> > > > wrote:
> > > >On Apr 14, 2:04 am, aspasia wrote:
> > > >> On Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:48:33 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

>
> > > >> > wrote:
> > > >> >In article
> > > >> >,
> > > >> > Sheldon > wrote:

>
> > > >> >> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> > > >> >> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> > > >> >> playing pilgrim.

>
> > > >> >You don't have kids or a wife, do you.

>
> > > >> >It's a great way to get iron into the diet.

>
> > > >> You couldn't HIRE me to use those non-stick coatings which migrate
> > > >> into the user's system with bad consequences. *Feh!

>
> > > >Do you have a citation to a refereed scientific journal that describes
> > > >those
> > > >bad consequences?

>
> > > >Cindy Hamilton

>
> > > I hope you don't mind if I suggest you do your own research. *I've
> > > seen a great deal on-line and in hard media over the years attesting
> > > to the damage done to people by fumes from these pans. *But that
> > > material may not rise to the scientific level of assurance you
> > > require.

>
> > Actually, the only things I've seen that seemed remotely credible was:

>
> > 1. *When heated to excess, some types of nonstick coatings can release
> > * * *fumes that are toxic to birds.

>
> > 2. *If you don't use the nonstick pan like an idiot, you're in no
> > danger.

>
> > I'm really looking for a citation in the New England Journal of
> > Medicine,
> > the Lancet, or peer-reviewed toxicology journals. *Perhaps I'll see
> > what I can
> > find. *It seems to me that the burden of proof is on the person making
> > the
> > claims, however.

>
> > Cindy Hamilton

>
> I don't know if this is pertinent or not, but five years ago a
> co-worker, who works as a scientist in environmental engineering and
> science, shared with me an article from USA Today written by Elizabeth
> Weise, "Posted 4/23/2003 10:08 PM - Updated 4/24/2003 1:24 AM". *The
> title of the article is, "Out of the frying pan, into a fire." *I won't
> post/share the entire article here because that would be an infringement
> of copyright. *But for reference, here are a couple of paragraphs quoted
> from the article that may help, or perhaps not:
>
> * * *"Last week the Environmental Protection Agency announced concerns
> about a widely used chemical called perfluorinated acid. Tests in rats
> have shown reduced fetal weight of pups, delays in maturation and kidney
> problems - and 92% of Americans tested had trace amounts of it in their
> blood. That's because so-called PFOA or its byproducts are used in the
> manufacturing process for Teflon and Gore-Tex and can be released as the
> original Scotchguard and Stainmaster break down. PFOA also has other
> industrial uses."


PFOA is used in Teflon manufacture. This doesn't seem to say anything
about Teflon use.

> * * *"This month a paper in the journal Current Biology reported that a
> commonly used plastic ingredient called bisphenol A caused abnormal
> pregnancies in mice and might cause reproductive problems in people.
> Last year a Swedish study found that a flame retardant used in TV sets,
> computer circuit boards and casings, foams and fabric called
> polybrominated diphenyl ether, or PBDE, is rapidly accumulating in human
> breast milk. The chemical is thought to cause thyroid cancer and
> possibly neurodevelopmental problems in test animals."


Also nothing to do with using Teflon-coated pans.

> Hope this helps you to find appropriate citations for particular studies
> and papers if you're so inclinded.
>
> Sky, who is no scientist and has no "environmental engineering and
> science" background <-----disclaimer!


I'll continue to use my Teflon pans for the tasks for which they're
suited,
my stainless-steel pans for their tasks, and my cast iron when it's
suitable.

Cindy Hamilton


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

aspasia wrote:
> On Mon, 14 Apr 2008 09:51:00 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
>
> I hope you don't mind if I suggest you do your own research. I've
> seen a great deal on-line and in hard media over the years attesting
> to the damage done to people by fumes from these pans. But that
> material may not rise to the scientific level of assurance you
> require.


All I could find was dead birds.
Imo, scientific or not, if you've found some convincing evidence, it's
your responsibility to share it with less-enlightened peeps.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 06:26:54 -0500, JonL > wrote:

>All I could find was dead birds.
>Imo, scientific or not, if you've found some convincing evidence, it's
>your responsibility to share it with less-enlightened peeps.


Agreed -- assuming you can find any.

-- Larry

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