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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 18:00:11 -0500, Peter A >
wrote:

>Soap does not - repeat, DOES NOT - remove seasoning from cast iron when
>used properly.


Exactly!

>So many people get all silly about cleaning cast iron.


My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
found it useless.

>I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
>a soft brush.


Everyone has their collecting vices. Mine is cast iron. I've got
well over 40 pieces. Including me, I've got 4 generations worth.
They ALL get cleaned with soap. My older Wagner and Griswold pans are
the choice always used for eggs. Just as non-stick as anything else
without the chemical smell.

Lou
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 21:36:18 -0600, "HeyBub" > wrote:

>Peter A wrote:
>>>>
>>>> How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should
>>>> be sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your
>>>> skillet) to water.
>>>
>>> Water is not the problem, as long as you dry it after rinsing. I set
>>> it on the still hot burner after rinsing. I never use soap on my
>>> cast iron. I put a little hot water in it, scrub with a brush, rinse
>>> and dry it on the burner. Then I rub it with a little oil or butter
>>> before the next use. Soap will quickly remove the seasoning.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>> seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution
>> and a soft brush.

>
>Why?


Prove why soap shouldn't be used.

Lou
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 21:40:45 -0600, "HeyBub" > wrote:

>jt august wrote:
>> In article >,
>> "HeyBub" > wrote:
>>
>>> Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.

>>
>> How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
>> bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding,
>> sorry, I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean
>> wooden salad bowls.

>
>You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and spices
>from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of flavors
>and aromas.


There's something wrong with you.

Lou

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 03:46:51 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
> wrote:

>"HeyBub" > wrote in message
...
>> jt august wrote:
>>> In article >,
>>> "HeyBub" > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.
>>>
>>> How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
>>> bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding,
>>> sorry, I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean
>>> wooden salad bowls.

>>
>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and spices
>> from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of flavors
>> and aromas.
>>
>> If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced nose,
>> use styrofoam.
>>

>
>
>As usual, you are a complete idiot.
>


I agree with the idiot part. What group does this thread come from?

Lou
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 02:56:06 GMT, jt august > wrote:

>In article >,
> "HeyBub" > wrote:
>
>> Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.

>
>How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
>bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding, sorry,
>I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean wooden salad
>bowls.


Soap and water.

Lou


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 07:50:46 -0600, "HeyBub" > wrote:

>JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
>>>
>>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
>>> spices from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique
>>> palette of flavors and aromas.
>>>
>>> If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced
>>> nose, use styrofoam.
>>>

>>
>>
>> As usual, you are a complete idiot.

>
>No, I am a gourmet.
>
>It is admittedly sometimes difficult, surrounded as I am by Philistines who
>find picking hair out of their weevil-flavored rice balls the epitome of
>culinary accomplishments.
>
>For those whose sensibilites are not as finely honed, the whole issue can
>easily be resolved by choosing salad bowls made of Aluminum, preferably with
>a pop-top to match the other china and utensils.
>
>You can't go wrong watching Martha Stewart.


LOL. Her obnoxiousness has worn off on you.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 18:00:11 -0500, Peter A >
> wrote:
>
>>Soap does not - repeat, DOES NOT - remove seasoning from cast iron when
>>used properly.

>
> Exactly!
>
>>So many people get all silly about cleaning cast iron.

>
> My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
> found it useless.



That's the only way I clean my cast iron pan. I use coarse kosher salt and a
paper towel. I only use the pan for eggs, and always at medium heat levels,
so stuff never gets REALLY stuck on. Salt works fine.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 03:46:51 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
> > wrote:
>
>>"HeyBub" > wrote in message
...
>>> jt august wrote:
>>>> In article >,
>>>> "HeyBub" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.
>>>>
>>>> How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
>>>> bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding,
>>>> sorry, I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean
>>>> wooden salad bowls.
>>>
>>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
>>> spices
>>> from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of
>>> flavors
>>> and aromas.
>>>
>>> If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced nose,
>>> use styrofoam.
>>>

>>
>>
>>As usual, you are a complete idiot.
>>

>
> I agree with the idiot part. What group does this thread come from?
>
> Lou



I first saw it in alt.home.repair.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 5, 12:45*pm, Lou Decruss > wrote:
> On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 18:00:11 -0500, Peter A >
> wrote:
>
> >Soap does not - repeat, DOES NOT - remove seasoning from cast iron when
> >used properly.

>
> Exactly!
>
> >So many people get all silly about cleaning cast iron.

>
> My favorite example of silliness is using salt. *I tried it once and
> found it useless.
>
> >I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
> >seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
> >a soft brush.

>
> Everyone has their collecting vices. *Mine is cast iron. *I've got
> well over 40 pieces. *Including me, I've got 4 generations worth.
> They ALL get cleaned with soap. *My older Wagner and Griswold pans are
> the choice always used for eggs. *Just as non-stick as anything else
> without the chemical smell.
>
> Lou


I've got well over 40 pieces (of cast iron)

Did you have to beef up your floor joists to support all that weight?
<g>
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 10:21�am, Doc > wrote:
> I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
> gather is a first cousin of Teflon. �Big mistake. It's non-stick
> properties aren't very good.
>
> I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
> into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
> of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
> wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
> going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
> treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
> as a cooking surface.
>
> Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
> abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
> particles since I assume it's toxic.


You bought a Chinese wok knock off... Hunka Junk!

Real Chinese woks are cheap, need I say more.

Were I in the market for a wok I'd try this:
http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...-hammered.html


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 11:45:37 -0600, Lou Decruss
> wrote:

>My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
>found it useless.
>
>>I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>>seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
>>a soft brush.


Howdy,

Yes, silliness abounds...

I know that I am about to tread on religious matters, but
here goes:

I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
want of a better word), silly.

In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
carefully seasoned for years.

Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
cookware.

Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
comparison.

As has been my experience, they could detect no difference
between those, and brand new off the shelf un-seasoned pans.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Kenneth" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 11:45:37 -0600, Lou Decruss
> > wrote:
>
>>My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
>>found it useless.
>>
>>>I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>>>seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
>>>a soft brush.

>
> Howdy,
>
> Yes, silliness abounds...
>
> I know that I am about to tread on religious matters, but
> here goes:
>
> I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
> always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
> want of a better word), silly.
>
> In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
> between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
> carefully seasoned for years.
>
> Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
> cookware.
>
> Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
> members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
> find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
> comparison.
>
> As has been my experience, they could detect no difference
> between those, and brand new off the shelf un-seasoned pans.
>
> All the best,
> --
> Kenneth
>
> If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."



Unseasoned pans will discolor some food, and leave a metallic taste. But,
some people may not notice.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Kenneth wrote:
>
> I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
> always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
> want of a better word), silly.
>
> In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
> between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
> carefully seasoned for years.
>
> Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
> cookware.
>
> Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
> members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
> find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
> comparison.
>
> As has been my experience, they could detect no difference


Except the elderly could no longer lift them.

I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 17:56:23 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
> wrote:

>"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
.. .
>> On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 18:00:11 -0500, Peter A >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>Soap does not - repeat, DOES NOT - remove seasoning from cast iron when
>>>used properly.

>>
>> Exactly!
>>
>>>So many people get all silly about cleaning cast iron.

>>
>> My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
>> found it useless.

>
>
>That's the only way I clean my cast iron pan.


As I said, I have more than one.

> I use coarse kosher salt and a
>paper towel. I only use the pan for eggs, and always at medium heat levels,
>so stuff never gets REALLY stuck on.


I use some of mine at heat levels that would immediately destroy
non-stick.

>Salt works fine.


So does soap.

Lou


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 10:27:01 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
> wrote:

>On Mar 5, 12:45*pm, Lou Decruss > wrote:
>> On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 18:00:11 -0500, Peter A >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >Soap does not - repeat, DOES NOT - remove seasoning from cast iron when
>> >used properly.

>>
>> Exactly!
>>
>> >So many people get all silly about cleaning cast iron.

>>
>> My favorite example of silliness is using salt. *I tried it once and
>> found it useless.
>>
>> >I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>> >seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
>> >a soft brush.

>>
>> Everyone has their collecting vices. *Mine is cast iron. *I've got
>> well over 40 pieces. *Including me, I've got 4 generations worth.
>> They ALL get cleaned with soap. *My older Wagner and Griswold pans are
>> the choice always used for eggs. *Just as non-stick as anything else
>> without the chemical smell.
>>
>> Lou

>
> I've got well over 40 pieces (of cast iron)
>
>Did you have to beef up your floor joists to support all that weight?
><g>


They're not all in the same place. But you're right. They are heavy.

Lou


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On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 13:53:25 -0500, Kenneth
> wrote:

>On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 11:45:37 -0600, Lou Decruss
> wrote:
>
>>My favorite example of silliness is using salt. I tried it once and
>>found it useless.
>>
>>>I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
>>>seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution and
>>>a soft brush.

>
>Howdy,
>
>Yes, silliness abounds...
>
>I know that I am about to tread on religious matters, but
>here goes:
>
>I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
>always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
>want of a better word), silly.
>
>In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
>between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
>carefully seasoned for years.
>
>Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
>cookware.
>
>Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
>members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
>find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
>comparison.
>
>As has been my experience, they could detect no difference
>between those, and brand new off the shelf un-seasoned pans.


The new Lodge pans have a different finish than the older ones. I've
got lodge pans over 10 years old that aren't as good as the older
ones. For cooking meat on high heat there's no difference. But try
making eggs in a new Lodge pan.

Lou
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 11:03:29 -0800 (PST), Sheldon >
wrote:

>Kenneth wrote:
>>
>> I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
>> always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
>> want of a better word), silly.
>>
>> In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
>> between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
>> carefully seasoned for years.
>>
>> Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
>> cookware.
>>
>> Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
>> members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
>> find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
>> comparison.
>>
>> As has been my experience, they could detect no difference

>
>Except the elderly could no longer lift them.


That's how I got some of mine.
>
>I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
>kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.


Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp.

Lou

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Lou Decruss wrote:
>>
>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
>> spices from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique
>> palette of flavors and aromas.

>
> There's something wrong with you.
>


Everything I am I owe to using unwashed salad bowls.

And an ant farm I had as a kid.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 17:01:04 -0600, Lou Decruss
> wrote:

>The new Lodge pans have a different finish than the older ones. I've
>got lodge pans over 10 years old that aren't as good as the older
>ones. For cooking meat on high heat there's no difference. But try
>making eggs in a new Lodge pan.
>
>Lou


Hi Lou,

If they are coated with something, I would remove it.

Then, with an iron surface, when the pan is hot enough for
water droplets to "dance" rather than boil, and with some
butter tossed in, eggs will slide right out of the pan.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Lou Decruss wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
> >Kenneth wrote:

>
> >> I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
> >> always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
> >> want of a better word), silly.

>
> >> In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
> >> between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
> >> carefully seasoned for years.

>
> >> Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
> >> cookware.

>
> >> Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
> >> members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
> >> find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
> >> comparison.

>
> >> As has been my experience, they could detect no difference

>
> >Except the elderly could no longer lift them.

>
> That's how I got some of mine.
>
> >I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
> >kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.

>
> Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp. �


Thanks for proving my point... those of us with real life experience
and measurable IQs don't need to work as fork lifts. My momma taught
me that no one pays much for jackass labor. That said I have no doubt
I can out muscle two of you.

The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
playing pilgrim. It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. I've yet to see a professional
kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. Cast iron cookware makes
steel wheel roller skates and wooden golf clubs seem like state of the
art. Cast iron cookware went out of vogue before the Wright Brothers
flew at Kitty Hawk, before Edison's light bulb.



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Sheldon wrote:
> Lou Decruss wrote:
>
>>Sheldon wrote:
>>
>>>Kenneth wrote:

>>
>>>>I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
>>>>always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
>>>>want of a better word), silly.

>>
>>>>In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
>>>>between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
>>>>carefully seasoned for years.

>>
>>>>Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
>>>>cookware.

>>
>>>>Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
>>>>members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
>>>>find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
>>>>comparison.

>>
>>>>As has been my experience, they could detect no difference

>>
>>>Except the elderly could no longer lift them.

>>
>>That's how I got some of mine.
>>
>>
>>>I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
>>>kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.

>>
>>Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp. �

>
>
> Thanks for proving my point... those of us with real life experience
> and measurable IQs don't need to work as fork lifts. My momma taught
> me that no one pays much for jackass labor. That said I have no doubt
> I can out muscle two of you.
>
> The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> playing pilgrim. It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
> cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
> wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. I've yet to see a professional
> kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. Cast iron cookware makes
> steel wheel roller skates and wooden golf clubs seem like state of the
> art. Cast iron cookware went out of vogue before the Wright Brothers
> flew at Kitty Hawk, before Edison's light bulb.
>


Two advantages to cast iron:

1) thermal mass. Sometimes that's a benefit, sometimes it's not, but
sometimes you want even cooking over the ability to heat/cool quickly.

2) you have to work very, very hard to render a cast iron skillet
unusable. You have one, you have a skillet for life. That appeals to
my chea^H^H^H^Hfrugal side.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 08:35:22 -0500, Peter A
> wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> Then, with an iron surface, when the pan is hot enough for
>> water droplets to "dance" rather than boil, and with some
>> butter tossed in, eggs will slide right out of the pan.
>>

>
>The only problem is that cooking eggs at such a high temperature gives
>you tough eggs.
>
>--
>Peter Aitken
>Author, MS Word for Medical and Technical Writers
>www.tech-word.com


Howdy,

That's certainly not my experience, but if it doesn't work
for you, I hope that you have a method that you prefer.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 17:44:37 -0800, Oren > wrote:

>>
>>Spoken like a true abused kitchen slave. Wife trouble?

>
>Not when I cook in the yard, declare my turf and so. I'm going to
>China town in Las Vegas and get me a wok. Might have the bride drive
>me.
>
>Nice try!



All you are saying is that a wok is the sum of your whole manhood and
its stir fried.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 11:30:58 -0500, Peter A
> wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> Howdy,
>>
>> That's certainly not my experience, but if it doesn't work
>> for you, I hope that you have a method that you prefer.
>>
>> All the best,
>> --
>> Kenneth
>>
>>

>
>Yep - my goal is eggs where all the white is set but the yolk is still
>runny. I use a 6 inch nonstick pan over just-below-medium heat. Melt a
>little butter and put in 2 eggs, salt & white pepper, then cover with a
>glass lid. Cook for about 5 minutes. The cover traps the heat so you do
>not have to "over easy" the eggs to cook all the white. You can check
>for doneness by jiggling the pan to see if the whites right around the
>yolk (the last to cook) still tremble.


Hi Peter,

Ooops... I was in omelet mode,
--
Kenneth

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 09:31:19 -0500, Kenneth
> wrote:

>On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 08:35:22 -0500, Peter A
> wrote:
>
>>In article >,
says...
>>> Then, with an iron surface, when the pan is hot enough for
>>> water droplets to "dance" rather than boil, and with some
>>> butter tossed in, eggs will slide right out of the pan.
>>>

>>
>>The only problem is that cooking eggs at such a high temperature gives
>>you tough eggs.
>>
>>--
>>Peter Aitken
>>Author, MS Word for Medical and Technical Writers
>>www.tech-word.com

>
>Howdy,
>
>That's certainly not my experience, but if it doesn't work
>for you, I hope that you have a method that you prefer.
>
>All the best,


Howdy Kenneth!!!

I don't like tough eggs with burnt edges. I like a nice runny yolk
with my whites just barely set. I use medium heat. Dancing water
droplets is to hot for my eggs. I add the eggs and put a teaspoon of
water next to them and cover. The steam sets the top, but has little
effect on the yolk unless you let them cook to long. Perfect eggs
every time.

Lou



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Nate Nagel wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
> > Lou Decruss wrote:

>
> >>Sheldon wrote:

>
> >>>Kenneth wrote:

>
> >>>>I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
> >>>>always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
> >>>>want of a better word), silly.

>
> >>>>In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
> >>>>between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
> >>>>carefully seasoned for years.

>
> >>>>Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
> >>>>cookware.

>
> >>>>Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
> >>>>members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
> >>>>find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
> >>>>comparison.

>
> >>>>As has been my experience, they could detect no difference

>
> >>>Except the elderly could no longer lift them.

>
> >>That's how I got some of mine.

>
> >>>I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
> >>>kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.

>
> >>Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp. �

>
> > Thanks for proving my point... those of us with real life experience
> > and measurable IQs don't need to work as fork lifts. *My momma taught
> > me that no one pays much for jackass labor. *That said I have no doubt
> > I can out muscle two of you.

>
> > The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
> > and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
> > playing pilgrim. *It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
> > cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
> > wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. *I've yet to see a professional
> > kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. *Cast iron cookware makes
> > steel wheel roller skates and wooden golf clubs seem like state of the
> > art. *Cast iron cookware went out of vogue before the Wright Brothers
> > flew at Kitty Hawk, before Edison's light bulb.

>
> Two advantages to cast iron:
>
> 1) thermal mass. *


Don't you mean your dense cranium... BTUs trump thermal mass every
time... buy a proper stove.

> 2) you have to work very, very hard to render a cast iron skillet
> unusable.


Bullshit. They rust, they crack, and if dropped they smash stuff...
what needs very hard work is to maintain their utileness.

With quality stainless steel pans there's is plenty of thermal mass,
no special maintenance is necessary, and if one actually knows how to
cook nothing will stick to properly seasoned stainless steel.

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

> wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 09:31:18 -0800 (PST), Sheldon >
> wrote:
>
>>Nate Nagel wrote:
>>> Sheldon wrote:
>>> > Lou Decruss wrote:
>>>
>>> >>Sheldon wrote:
>>>
>>> >>>Kenneth wrote:
>>>
>>> >>>>I've used cast iron happily for about 50 years, but have
>>> >>>>always thought the whole seasoning thing to be, well, (for
>>> >>>>want of a better word), silly.
>>>
>>> >>>>In terms of sticking, I could not detect a difference
>>> >>>>between a brand new, unseasoned pan, and one that I had
>>> >>>>carefully seasoned for years.
>>>
>>> >>>>Then, a few years ago, Consumer's Reports tested cast iron
>>> >>>>cookware.
>>>
>>> >>>>Among other aspects of their testing, they asked staff
>>> >>>>members to contact elderly relatives to see if they could
>>> >>>>find generations old, super-well seasoned pans, for
>>> >>>>comparison.
>>>
>>> >>>>As has been my experience, they could detect no difference
>>>
>>> >>>Except the elderly could no longer lift them.
>>>
>>> >>That's how I got some of mine.
>>>
>>> >>>I don't know why anyone needs cookware from the iron age, it's a
>>> >>>kitchen for cripe's sake... you wanna pump iron join Gold's Gym.
>>>
>>> >>Maybe some of us are younger and stronger than you shemp. ?
>>>
>>> > Thanks for proving my point... those of us with real life experience
>>> > and measurable IQs don't need to work as fork lifts. My momma taught
>>> > me that no one pays much for jackass labor. That said I have no doubt
>>> > I can out muscle two of you.
>>>
>>> > The only reason folks buy cast iron cookware is because it's cheap,
>>> > and they are too poor or miserly to buy real cookware or they enjoy
>>> > playing pilgrim. It makes as much sense cooking with cast iron
>>> > cookware in 2008 as it does commuting to work in a cart with wooden
>>> > wheels pulled by a yoke of oxen. I've yet to see a professional
>>> > kitchen that uses cast iron pots and pans. Cast iron cookware makes
>>> > steel wheel roller skates and wooden golf clubs seem like state of the
>>> > art. Cast iron cookware went out of vogue before the Wright Brothers
>>> > flew at Kitty Hawk, before Edison's light bulb.
>>>
>>> Two advantages to cast iron:
>>>
>>> 1) thermal mass.

>>
>>Don't you mean your dense cranium... BTUs trump thermal mass every
>>time... buy a proper stove.
>>
>>> 2) you have to work very, very hard to render a cast iron skillet
>>> unusable.

>>
>>Bullshit. They rust, they crack, and if dropped they smash stuff...
>>what needs very hard work is to maintain their utileness.
>>
>>With quality stainless steel pans there's is plenty of thermal mass,
>>no special maintenance is necessary, and if one actually knows how to
>>cook nothing will stick to properly seasoned stainless steel.

>
> Comedy GOLD!
>
>


Got popcorn?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 23:22:57 GMT, Lou Decruss
> wrote:

>On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 12:11:37 -0500, Peter A >
>wrote:
>
>>In article >,
says...
>>> >Yep - my goal is eggs where all the white is set but the yolk is still
>>> >runny. I use a 6 inch nonstick pan over just-below-medium heat. Melt a
>>> >little butter and put in 2 eggs, salt & white pepper, then cover with a
>>> >glass lid. Cook for about 5 minutes. The cover traps the heat so you do
>>> >not have to "over easy" the eggs to cook all the white. You can check
>>> >for doneness by jiggling the pan to see if the whites right around the
>>> >yolk (the last to cook) still tremble.
>>>
>>> Hi Peter,
>>>
>>> Ooops... I was in omelet mode,
>>> --
>>> Kenneth
>>>

>>
>>For omelets I use a 6 inch aluminum pan with sloped sides - it is the
>>oldest pan I own. I bought it about 30 years ago based on the
>>recommendation of Julia Child (and the fact that I could afford it).
>>
>>I have never seen a cast iron pan with the proper shape for omelets.

>
>For omelets I use stainless. But I wouldn't mind trying an aluminum
>pan if I had one. Actually I might add an aluminum pan to my wish
>list.
>
>Lou


Hi Lou,

This is what French omelet chefs are likely to use:

http://kingsandqueens.org.uk/en-gb/dept_732.html

They are great.

They make 'em in two versions. The more expensive has a cast
iron handle. The less costly has a steel handle.

Interestingly, I find the steel handle to be far better
because the iron handle is round and that makes manipulating
the pan more difficult because the handle tends to slip in
my hand.

The only down side is that these pans are quite heavy, but
other than that, I believe they are the best for the
purpose.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 17:51:25 -0600, "HeyBub" > wrote:

>Lou Decruss wrote:
>>>
>>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
>>> spices from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique
>>> palette of flavors and aromas.

>>
>> There's something wrong with you.
>>

>
>Everything I am I owe to using unwashed salad bowls.


And your mother didn't wash her hands after she took a dump.

>And an ant farm I had as a kid.


Was that your bedroom?

Lou



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 12:11:37 -0500, Peter A >
wrote:

>In article >,
says...
>> >Yep - my goal is eggs where all the white is set but the yolk is still
>> >runny. I use a 6 inch nonstick pan over just-below-medium heat. Melt a
>> >little butter and put in 2 eggs, salt & white pepper, then cover with a
>> >glass lid. Cook for about 5 minutes. The cover traps the heat so you do
>> >not have to "over easy" the eggs to cook all the white. You can check
>> >for doneness by jiggling the pan to see if the whites right around the
>> >yolk (the last to cook) still tremble.

>>
>> Hi Peter,
>>
>> Ooops... I was in omelet mode,
>> --
>> Kenneth
>>

>
>For omelets I use a 6 inch aluminum pan with sloped sides - it is the
>oldest pan I own. I bought it about 30 years ago based on the
>recommendation of Julia Child (and the fact that I could afford it).
>
>I have never seen a cast iron pan with the proper shape for omelets.


For omelets I use stainless. But I wouldn't mind trying an aluminum
pan if I had one. Actually I might add an aluminum pan to my wish
list.

Lou


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 12:11:37 -0500, Peter A >
> wrote:
>
>>In article >,
says...
>>> >Yep - my goal is eggs where all the white is set but the yolk is still
>>> >runny. I use a 6 inch nonstick pan over just-below-medium heat. Melt a
>>> >little butter and put in 2 eggs, salt & white pepper, then cover with a
>>> >glass lid. Cook for about 5 minutes. The cover traps the heat so you do
>>> >not have to "over easy" the eggs to cook all the white. You can check
>>> >for doneness by jiggling the pan to see if the whites right around the
>>> >yolk (the last to cook) still tremble.
>>>
>>> Hi Peter,
>>>
>>> Ooops... I was in omelet mode,
>>> --
>>> Kenneth
>>>

>>
>>For omelets I use a 6 inch aluminum pan with sloped sides - it is the
>>oldest pan I own. I bought it about 30 years ago based on the
>>recommendation of Julia Child (and the fact that I could afford it).
>>
>>I have never seen a cast iron pan with the proper shape for omelets.

>
> For omelets I use stainless. But I wouldn't mind trying an aluminum
> pan if I had one. Actually I might add an aluminum pan to my wish
> list.
>
> Lou



Why, if you have stainless steel pans?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Lou Decruss wrote:
> On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 17:51:25 -0600, "HeyBub" > wrote:
>
>> Lou Decruss wrote:
>>>>
>>>> You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
>>>> spices from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique
>>>> palette of flavors and aromas.
>>>
>>> There's something wrong with you.
>>>

>>
>> Everything I am I owe to using unwashed salad bowls.

>
> And your mother didn't wash her hands after she took a dump.


My mother didn't "take a dump." She was too refined. Where'd you learn about
mothers and dumps?

>
>> And an ant farm I had as a kid.

>
> Was that your bedroom?
>


Yes, as a matter of fact.


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On Fri, 07 Mar 2008 00:00:19 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
> wrote:

>"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
.. .


>> For omelets I use stainless. But I wouldn't mind trying an aluminum
>> pan if I had one. Actually I might add an aluminum pan to my wish
>> list.
>>
>> Lou

>
>
>Why, if you have stainless steel pans?


Curiosity.

Lou

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On Mar 4, 10:21*am, Doc > wrote:
> I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
> gather is a first cousin of Teflon. *Big mistake. It's non-stick
> properties aren't very good.
>
> I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
> into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
> of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
> wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
> going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
> treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
> as a cooking surface.
>
> Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
> abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
> particles since I assume it's toxic.
>
> Thanks


Pitch it man recycle it and get a real wok....no sense in worrying if
you are eating toxic food all the time.

More advice: learn to cook - stop buying teflon or any non-stick
cookware. Get a gas stove and get some steel cookware....with huge
riveted handles, and airtight lids, EVERYTHING will look and taste
better.
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On Sun, 9 Mar 2008 12:10:29 -0400, Peter A >
wrote:

>You are just being silly. Claiming that a gas stove is necessary for
>good cooking and that nonstick pans don't have a place in the kitchen
>just shows your ignorance.


Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
example. However, Non stick woks do not.

------------
There are no atheists in foxholes
or in Fenway Park in an extra inning
game.
____

Cape Cod Bob

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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 03:14:03 -0400, Cape Cod Bob
> wrote:

>Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>example.


There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes. You might note that there are
no non-stick commercial crepe makers. All I do on my commercial crepe makers is
use clarified butter, and there is never the slightest sticking or build-up.

>However, Non stick woks do not.


I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a non-stick wok.

-- Larry
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"pltrgyst" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 03:14:03 -0400, Cape Cod Bob
> > wrote:
>
>>Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
>>example.

>
> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes. You might note that
> there are
> no non-stick commercial crepe makers. All I do on my commercial crepe
> makers is
> use clarified butter, and there is never the slightest sticking or
> build-up.
>
>>However, Non stick woks do not.

>
> I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a
> non-stick wok.
>
> -- Larry



Well, that settles that. A statistic. One.

Does he just use it, or does he also talk about the wok?


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pltrgyst wrote:
> Cape Cod Bob wrote:
> >Non stick pans have a definite place in t he kitchen - crepe pans for
> >example.

>
> There is no reason to prefer non-stick for crepes. You might note that there are
> no non-stick commercial crepe makers. All I do on my commercial crepe makers is
> use clarified butter, and there is never the slightest sticking or build-up.
>
> >However, Non stick woks do not.

>
> I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a non-stick wok.


FoodTV personalities cook whatever and with whatever their sponsors
(the people who pay them) mandate. Professional kitchens are nothing
like FoodTV cartoon kitchens.

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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 10:10:43 -0400, pltrgyst
> wrote:

>
>I would point out that no less a chef than Ming Tsai often uses a non-stick wok.
>
>-- Larry


Hi Larry,

That may well be true, but it tells us little because there
may be issues of sponsorship.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

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On Mon, 10 Mar 2008 10:58:38 -0400, Peter A > wrote:

>Of course there are no commercial non-stick crepe makers. Commercial
>equipment must be durable - in a restaurant a crepe maker will be used
>dozens of times a day, at home once a week maybe. For the home chef who
>is not an expert cook and wants to minimize fat use, non-stick has
>definite advantages.


Yes, it does. But that was not the context of the suggestion that non-stick is
useful in the home for making crepes. In fact, using non-stick results in
markedly inferior crepes, since the fat does not distribute evenly across the
cooking surface.

>I wouldn't go holding up Ming Tsai as some sort of authority. He strikes
>me as one of those gadfly cooking personalities, not a real chef.


I don't know why you would have that impression -- he's been there cooking or
expediting every one of the dozen or so times we've been to Blue Ginger. Blue
Ginger is one of our favorite restaurants in the entire US. The food is
inventive and of extraordinary quality.

> Still, I could imagine valid uses for a nonstick wok as long as you don't do
>any wok cooking in it.


Agreed.

-- Larry

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