Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 12-02-2005, 10:20 PM
JJ
 
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Default Picture of a "smoke ring" please...

Hey All,

I'm not sure exactly what this "smoke ring" is?
Anybody have a "link" that shows this?

I'm assuming this is a thin layer of color at the outer surface of the
meat that is due to the smoke permeating?

Thanks

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Old 12-02-2005, 10:51 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"JJ" wrote in message
...
Hey All,

I'm not sure exactly what this "smoke ring" is?
Anybody have a "link" that shows this?

I'm assuming this is a thin layer of color at the outer surface of the
meat that is due to the smoke permeating?


It is not so much the smoke penetrating is as much as the ingredients in the
smoke reacting with the meat. Here is some information for you.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/

What is a smoke ring?



Smoke rings are produced by a chemical reaction between the meat and the
penetration of the smoke. See the section about chicken for a better
understanding of the chemical reaction.



Why is my BBQ chicken pink? Is it still raw?



No, the smoke has a reaction with the chemicals in the bone. The meat turns
a pink color even though it is thoroughly cooked. Ash is loaded with
potassium and sodium nitrates. This reacts with oxymethyglobin to form
nitrosaminoglobulins and gives us the pink color of hams, lunch meats, hot
dogs, and smoke rings.



Man has known this for a long time and has been using salt to preserve meat.
It was found that nitrates are a natural impurity in salt. This was isolated
and used to chemically cure meat. (Salt peter)


The red color in poultry
comes from a reaction that happens when one of the proteins in raw poultry
(myoglobin) comes in contact with nitrate or nitrate. This is given off
during the smoking process, and as you've learned, overcooking the meat
until it doesn't taste good won't change the situation. Think of that rosy
color as a gorgeous, earthy tone that indicates how lovingly you've prepared
your turkey for you and your guests!


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Old 14-02-2005, 05:06 AM
JJ
 
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http://www.simmerstock.com/archives/...ng/000592.html
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Old 14-02-2005, 05:17 AM
ToLo
 
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JJ said on 2/13/2005 11:06 PM:
http://www.simmerstock.com/archives/...ng/000592.html


Great picture of a smoke ring. Pictures made me hungry!!


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