Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-07-2011, 01:50 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,122
Default The Reverse Sear - any thoughts on this?

The REVERSE SEAR (aka Finney Method)
1. Thaw meat (if frozen). If meat is refrigerated, remove from fridge when
you go out to light grill.
2. Pre-heat your grill to 200* and let stabilize. You can go as high as
250*. Higher really, but you guys are wanting a low internal finish temp. so
the lower the better. Also, a lower cooking temp will get you a smaller rise
in internal temp from carryover heat.
3. Insert meat probe into meat and place on the grill. Go as indirect as you
can with your cooker. You want gentle heat. A ceramic cooker is better for
that than an oven. (because an oven cycles on and off to keep temps within a
range)
4. When the internal temp of the meat reaches 5* below your target temp (if
cooking at 200-230*) remove steak to a plate and loosely tent with foil. (as
much as 10* under your target if cooking at 250*) Leave probe in meat.
5. Open vents on grill and raise temp as high as you feel comfortable. The
higher the better to keep a low internal finish temperature. (I know this
sounds backwards or reverse even, but trust me)
6. When the internal temp of your meat has dropped 2 - 5* from it's
carryover temp high, remove the probe and place meat directly over, and as
close to the coals as your cooking rack allows. (on a Primo with a full load
of charcoal you should be within a few inches, max) With extremely high heat
and close proximity to the coals you should have a good sear in seconds.
(remember, at this point you're only searing... the meat is cooked, so don't
leave it on there longer than you have to)





  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-07-2011, 08:31 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 954
Default The Reverse Sear - any thoughts on this?


"Pico Rico" wrote in message
...
The REVERSE SEAR (aka Finney Method)
1. Thaw meat (if frozen). If meat is refrigerated, remove from fridge when
you go out to light grill.
2. Pre-heat your grill to 200* and let stabilize. You can go as high as
250*. Higher really, but you guys are wanting a low internal finish temp.
so the lower the better. Also, a lower cooking temp will get you a smaller
rise in internal temp from carryover heat.
3. Insert meat probe into meat and place on the grill. Go as indirect as
you can with your cooker. You want gentle heat. A ceramic cooker is better
for that than an oven. (because an oven cycles on and off to keep temps
within a range)
4. When the internal temp of the meat reaches 5* below your target temp
(if cooking at 200-230*) remove steak to a plate and loosely tent with
foil. (as much as 10* under your target if cooking at 250*) Leave probe in
meat.
5. Open vents on grill and raise temp as high as you feel comfortable. The
higher the better to keep a low internal finish temperature. (I know this
sounds backwards or reverse even, but trust me)
6. When the internal temp of your meat has dropped 2 - 5* from it's
carryover temp high, remove the probe and place meat directly over, and as
close to the coals as your cooking rack allows. (on a Primo with a full
load of charcoal you should be within a few inches, max) With extremely
high heat and close proximity to the coals you should have a good sear in
seconds. (remember, at this point you're only searing... the meat is
cooked, so don't leave it on there longer than you have to)



Yes, I think it is a form of "sous vide", to address Sqwertz's comment.
First, "sous vide" means under vacuum in a plastic bag. That cooks the meat
in a water bath at a very slow rate to just over desired ultimate temp. I
use the term to apply to any technique that raises the internal temp. of the
meat to the "done" temp. very very slowly.

I'm going "sous vide in air" a 2.5" thick California chteaubriand in my WSM
at a very low temp,

to 130F. Then I'm going to sear it as hot as I can on the Weber kettle. I
use a basket to bring the charcoal to .75" from the grate. I'll sear a
minute or so on all sides.

Then we'll dine with an old Bordeaux wine.

Kent












  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-07-2011, 08:41 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,122
Default The Reverse Sear - any thoughts on this?


"Kent" wrote in message
...


Yes, I think it is a form of "sous vide", to address Sqwertz's comment.
First, "sous vide" means under vacuum in a plastic bag. That cooks the
meat in a water bath at a very slow rate to just over desired ultimate
temp. I use the term to apply to any technique that raises the internal
temp. of the meat to the "done" temp. very very slowly.

I'm going "sous vide in air" a 2.5" thick California chteaubriand in my
WSM at a very low temp . . .


Kent




no wonder they pick on you!




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reverse Phone Lookup Amazon Shopping Mall General Cooking 0 10-05-2008 11:40 AM
Sear-Roasted Salmon Fillets with Lemon-Ginger Butter AJ Recipes (moderated) 0 06-12-2006 01:48 AM
Tea with Reverse Osmosis [email protected] Tea 8 09-09-2005 01:03 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:04 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017