Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 09-04-2007, 06:26 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
DGD DGD is offline
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Default Stainless Steel

On Apr 8, 10:37 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

...



"DGD" wrote in message
oups.com...
These simply seem to be single burner tubes. How do they
compare to the old burner styles. Seems that one would need more of
them to provided the coverage, and hence use more gas. True?


Use of gas is related to heat output. A grill capable of say, 30,000 Btu
will use a given amount of fuel no matter the burner material,
configuration, or shape. My Vermont Castings has a couple of SS tubes
with holes in it. Simple, durable, still working perfectly after 6 or 7
years now.


My grates are porcelin coated cast iron, the best of all worlds. No
corrosion, heavy, good heat transfer.


As for the outer SS, I'd not go that way as it wold be a bitch to keep
clean and sparkling.


Check out the Vermont Casting Signature series if you want a well made
grill. Not the cheaper versions at the big box stores.


I'm in full agreement with Edwin regarding grates. Changing to
porcelin coated cast iron grates made all the difference in the world.
There's still not enough heat output to grill a steak to "char-rare".
It's great, however, for fish other stuff.

Kent


This is what I am somewhat confused about. I have had porcelain
covered grates that broke down and rusted (from a Broil King bbq).
Their replacements did the same in very short order ( in less than 2
years). So I am a bit off porcelain covered grates. How does one
distinguish between a good quality porcelain covered grate and a not-
so-good one? Have read elsewhere on this group that Cast Iron is the
only way to go but requires seasoning (periodic?). I leave my bbq out
all winter (Ottawa, Ontario). The thing that really seems to suffer
are the grates. The rest of the bbq is wearing relatively well (have
had it more than 6 years). Still lean towards to SS, simply because
of the corrosion issue, but have yet to find any information as to how
long one can expect this type of grate to last.

Doug


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Old 09-04-2007, 06:45 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 897
Default Stainless Steel


"DGD" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Apr 8, 10:37 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

...



"DGD" wrote in message
oups.com...
These simply seem to be single burner tubes. How do they
compare to the old burner styles. Seems that one would need more of
them to provided the coverage, and hence use more gas. True?


Use of gas is related to heat output. A grill capable of say, 30,000

Btu
will use a given amount of fuel no matter the burner material,
configuration, or shape. My Vermont Castings has a couple of SS tubes
with holes in it. Simple, durable, still working perfectly after 6 or

7
years now.


My grates are porcelin coated cast iron, the best of all worlds. No
corrosion, heavy, good heat transfer.


As for the outer SS, I'd not go that way as it wold be a bitch to keep
clean and sparkling.


Check out the Vermont Casting Signature series if you want a well made
grill. Not the cheaper versions at the big box stores.


I'm in full agreement with Edwin regarding grates. Changing to
porcelin coated cast iron grates made all the difference in the world.
There's still not enough heat output to grill a steak to "char-rare".
It's great, however, for fish other stuff.

Kent


This is what I am somewhat confused about. I have had porcelain
covered grates that broke down and rusted (from a Broil King bbq).
Their replacements did the same in very short order ( in less than 2
years). So I am a bit off porcelain covered grates. How does one
distinguish between a good quality porcelain covered grate and a not-
so-good one? Have read elsewhere on this group that Cast Iron is the
only way to go but requires seasoning (periodic?). I leave my bbq out
all winter (Ottawa, Ontario). The thing that really seems to suffer
are the grates. The rest of the bbq is wearing relatively well (have
had it more than 6 years). Still lean towards to SS, simply because
of the corrosion issue, but have yet to find any information as to how
long one can expect this type of grate to last.

Doug


I'm with Doug on this one. Porcelain covered cast iron have rusted out in 2
seasons twice on me...Went with a grill with larger diameter ss grates and
havn't had a problem in three years. Yep, they're not pretty and sparkely
but they get burnt off each time I use 'em so they're great.


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Old 09-04-2007, 07:02 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 33
Default Stainless Steel

Try putting aluminum foil over the grates when you're finished cooking.
Run the temp at high and cut things off when the smoke clears. It's
the barbecue equivalent of the self-cleaning oven.

Nonny

Jack Sloan wrote:
"DGD" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Apr 8, 10:37 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

...



"DGD" wrote in message
ups.com...
These simply seem to be single burner tubes. How do they
compare to the old burner styles. Seems that one would need more of
them to provided the coverage, and hence use more gas. True?
Use of gas is related to heat output. A grill capable of say, 30,000

Btu
will use a given amount of fuel no matter the burner material,
configuration, or shape. My Vermont Castings has a couple of SS tubes
with holes in it. Simple, durable, still working perfectly after 6 or

7
years now.
My grates are porcelin coated cast iron, the best of all worlds. No
corrosion, heavy, good heat transfer.
As for the outer SS, I'd not go that way as it wold be a bitch to keep
clean and sparkling.
Check out the Vermont Casting Signature series if you want a well made
grill. Not the cheaper versions at the big box stores.
I'm in full agreement with Edwin regarding grates. Changing to
porcelin coated cast iron grates made all the difference in the world.
There's still not enough heat output to grill a steak to "char-rare".
It's great, however, for fish other stuff.

Kent

This is what I am somewhat confused about. I have had porcelain
covered grates that broke down and rusted (from a Broil King bbq).
Their replacements did the same in very short order ( in less than 2
years). So I am a bit off porcelain covered grates. How does one
distinguish between a good quality porcelain covered grate and a not-
so-good one? Have read elsewhere on this group that Cast Iron is the
only way to go but requires seasoning (periodic?). I leave my bbq out
all winter (Ottawa, Ontario). The thing that really seems to suffer
are the grates. The rest of the bbq is wearing relatively well (have
had it more than 6 years). Still lean towards to SS, simply because
of the corrosion issue, but have yet to find any information as to how
long one can expect this type of grate to last.

Doug


I'm with Doug on this one. Porcelain covered cast iron have rusted out in 2
seasons twice on me...Went with a grill with larger diameter ss grates and
havn't had a problem in three years. Yep, they're not pretty and sparkely
but they get burnt off each time I use 'em so they're great.



--
---Nonnymus---

TINSTAAFL
There Is No Such Thing
As A Free Lunch
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:33 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 14
Default Stainless Steel



DGD wrote:
On Apr 8, 10:37 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

...



"DGD" wrote in message
ups.com...
These simply seem to be single burner tubes. How do they
compare to the old burner styles. Seems that one would need more of
them to provided the coverage, and hence use more gas. True?
Use of gas is related to heat output. A grill capable of say, 30,000 Btu
will use a given amount of fuel no matter the burner material,
configuration, or shape. My Vermont Castings has a couple of SS tubes
with holes in it. Simple, durable, still working perfectly after 6 or 7
years now.
My grates are porcelin coated cast iron, the best of all worlds. No
corrosion, heavy, good heat transfer.
As for the outer SS, I'd not go that way as it wold be a bitch to keep
clean and sparkling.
Check out the Vermont Casting Signature series if you want a well made
grill. Not the cheaper versions at the big box stores.

I'm in full agreement with Edwin regarding grates. Changing to
porcelin coated cast iron grates made all the difference in the world.
There's still not enough heat output to grill a steak to "char-rare".
It's great, however, for fish other stuff.

Kent


This is what I am somewhat confused about. I have had porcelain
covered grates that broke down and rusted (from a Broil King bbq).
Their replacements did the same in very short order ( in less than 2
years). So I am a bit off porcelain covered grates. How does one
distinguish between a good quality porcelain covered grate and a not-
so-good one? Have read elsewhere on this group that Cast Iron is the
only way to go but requires seasoning (periodic?). I leave my bbq out
all winter (Ottawa, Ontario). The thing that really seems to suffer
are the grates. The rest of the bbq is wearing relatively well (have
had it more than 6 years). Still lean towards to SS, simply because
of the corrosion issue, but have yet to find any information as to how
long one can expect this type of grate to last.

Doug


I haven't compared porcelain grates, but my Vermont Castings grates are
holding up fine. I guess they will rot if water finds the "clamp mark"
where the grill was held when coated, or if it gets chipped. The guy I
bought my grill from told me to treat them like regular cast iron; hit
them with some oil before each use (your second oil sprayer for the
grill will be a metal one!) and bake them dry if they are wet. Don't
use a bronze brush on them. You may not see a chip, but water will find
it and rot it and there is nothing you can do.

The cast iron grates on my Chargriller will probably last forever as I'm
paranoid about leaving them "exposed". I don't leave those grates out
for the winter (I'm down the 401 in London) but the VC is a year round item.

I think spring and fall are the two worst seasons for cast iron (around
here). It's always damp, and a cover slows down the drying.

All in all, you will get what you pay for. I've seen some SS Centro
units from CT rot from the bottom. The cast iron grills on the
President's Choice grills are half as thick as the VC ones. The valves
on a those grills are as stiff as a true BBQer upon hearing "boiled ribs".

Lots of Napolean grills in use around here. They have SS grates as an
option, and I haven't heard of any longevity problems. I'd put that
line on my list.

Whew! I got through that whole post without saying "China".

Aw, nuts...
--

Wally Bedford

"No one has ever had an idea in a dress suit."
Sir Frederick G. Banting
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Old 10-04-2007, 02:30 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Stainless Steel


"DGD" wrote in message
This is what I am somewhat confused about. I have had porcelain
covered grates that broke down and rusted (from a Broil King bbq).
Their replacements did the same in very short order ( in less than 2
years). So I am a bit off porcelain covered grates. How does one
distinguish between a good quality porcelain covered grate and a not-
so-good one?


Good ones are heavier castins with thicker coatings of the frit. Aside from
hoefully getting more by paing more, you can't easily tell if a coating is
durable from appearance alone. I do know that my grates are damned heavy
and still in perfect condition. I've never seen the Broil King close up.


Still lean towards to SS, simply because
of the corrosion issue, but have yet to find any information as to how
long one can expect this type of grate to last.


Should outlast us if it is a good alloy.




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