Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 25-08-2005, 03:01 PM
Faye
 
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Default Honey Nut Bread

This past weekend my friend who lives in NC son came home. He brought a
loaf of bread from a bakery in Wilmington. My friend loved the bread so
would like to have the recipe. She said it was called honey nut bread
although the ingredients didn't list honey. She said it had molasses
instead. Here is the list of ingredients from the bag-- Wheat flour,
water, salt, yeast, oil, malt, bran, pecans and molasses. Would anyone
happen to have a recipe with these ingredients or know where I might
find one.
Thanks for your help,
Faye


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Old 25-08-2005, 04:44 PM
Mike Avery
 
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Default

Faye wrote:

This past weekend my friend who lives in NC son came home. He brought a
loaf of bread from a bakery in Wilmington. My friend loved the bread so
would like to have the recipe. She said it was called honey nut bread
although the ingredients didn't list honey. She said it had molasses
instead. Here is the list of ingredients from the bag-- Wheat flour,
water, salt, yeast, oil, malt, bran, pecans and molasses. Would anyone
happen to have a recipe with these ingredients or know where I might
find one.


Here's a guess. By law, food manufacturers have to list ingredients in
descending order, by weight. So there is more flour than water, more
water than yeast, and so on.

The suggestion below is based on bakers percentages and weight in
grams. It's a starting point. It should make about 2 1 1/2 pound loaves.

Ingredient Bakers percent grams
Wheat flour 100 930
Water 65 610
Salt 2 19
Yeast 1.5 14
(Instant yeast)
Oil 1 14
Malt 1 14
Bran 1 14
Pecans 1 14
Molasses 1 14

It looks kinda light on pecans, so you might recheck the wrapper to make
sure you reported the ingredients in the correct order. The 65% water
is a common value for sandwich style breads. The 2% salt is a very
common salt level. Much higher and you taste it, much lower and it
doesn't help the bread.

Hope this helps,
Mike

PS - for most of the 14 gram solids, I'd use about two fairly level
teaspoons. Mike

--
....The irony is that Bill Gates claims to be making a stable operating
system and Linus Torvaldis claims to be trying to take over the world...

Mike Avery mavery at mail dot otherwhen dot com
home baker ICQ 16241692
networking guru AIM mavery81230
wordsmith Yahoo mavery81230

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Old 25-08-2005, 05:27 PM
Faye
 
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Default

Thanks Mike for this information.Probably my friend did copy the
ingredients correct but I will ask her to make sure. I'm not
experienced enough to translate this into cups or ounces so if you
could help me out a little further I sure would appreciate it. Like how
many ounces a gram is. I know this probably has been discussed here but
I just joined this group.
Thanks for your help,
Faye

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Old 25-08-2005, 08:50 PM
Mike Avery
 
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Default

Faye wrote:

Thanks Mike for this information.Probably my friend did copy the
ingredients correct but I will ask her to make sure. I'm not
experienced enough to translate this into cups or ounces so if you
could help me out a little further I sure would appreciate it. Like how
many ounces a gram is. I know this probably has been discussed here but
I just joined this group.


Sadly, not really. Water is easy. It's about 240 grams per cup. I'd
use 3 teaspoons of the 19 gram ingredients, 2 of the 14 gram ingredients.

However, flour is another matter altogether. In some tests run in
different baking groups we found that "a cup of flour" could vary by as
much as 50% from one person to another. How the flour is packed into
the cup is what makes the difference. Water doesn't pack. Granulated
solids do.

There are about 30 grams per ounce of weight. To ounce of volume is
another matter. Check your flour sack, they should have some sort of
information on the side with the nutritional information that will say
something like, "One serving = 1/4 cup (30 grams)" And from there, you
can do the math. (Note, those were numbers pulled out of... ahhh... the
air for demonstration purposes. Check your sack.)

If your bread is too wet, add flour; if its too dry, add water.

Good luck,
Mike

--
....The irony is that Bill Gates claims to be making a stable operating
system and Linus Torvaldis claims to be trying to take over the world...

Mike Avery mavery at mail dot otherwhen dot com
home baker ICQ 16241692
networking guru AIM mavery81230
wordsmith Yahoo mavery81230

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Old 25-08-2005, 09:02 PM
Faye
 
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Default

Thanks, you have been a big help. Think I just might be able to handle
it now and come up with a good loaf of bread.
Faye



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