Thread: cake tin sizes
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Old 10-09-2005, 08:03 AM
Alex Rast
 
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at Thu, 08 Sep 2005 12:54:53 GMT in
, (Vox
Humana) wrote :


"maria" wrote in message
news[email protected]
Thanks very much! I went to that site however and found conversions
for bread but not cakes. That means I am not sure how to convert the
eggs, sugar or other things that are in a cake but not in bread!


Then you missed the fundamental concept. You could apply this to any
baked goods: cakes, bread, cookies, ... You first convert all the
ingredients to weight if necessary. For instance, if the recipe calls
for 1 cup of AP flour, you have to convert that to 120 grams of flour.
One egg is 50 grams. Since you are in the UK, I skipped this point as I
assumed you were already using weight measures instead of cup
measurements.

Remember also one point that some people miss. If you're trying to fit a
pan, quantities must go up as the *square* of the given pan dimension if
you want the same thickness, or as the *cube* if you want the same aspect
ratio (i.e. the thickness maintains the same proportion). So, for instance,
if your recipe was given for a 22cm (9") pan, and your pan is 30cm, if you
wanted the cake to be as thick as the original, then you'd need to increase
the ratios by (30/22)^2 = 1.9 times. And if you wanted it to be
proportional in appearance, not a wider, thinner-looking cake, you'd need
to increase the ratio by (30/22)^3 = 2.5 times. Throw any baking times out
the window. The larger cake will take longer, but it won't be 1.9 times or
2.5 times. It will be somewhat shorter than 1.9 in general for the thin
version, and probably a little longer than 2.5 for the same-aspect-ratio
version. This can have an impact on center versus outside texture and
browning. You may need a slightly lower temperature for the large version
if the recipe has a very high sugar content or sensitive ingredients like
chocolate. Lots of variables here. It's better to test the cake during
baking rather than try to scale baking times up or down.


--
Alex Rast

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